Water Is Water

Water is Water9781596439849_p0_v1_s192x300Water Is Water

Miranda Paul, Author

Jason Chin, Illustrator

Roaring Brook Press, Nonfiction, May 26, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Water cycles, Seasons, Rhyming, Diversity

Opening: “Drip. Sip. Pour me a cup. Water is water unless…it heats up.”

Synopsis: Two children explore the different phases of the water cycle during the year. They experience rain turning into fog, snow, and ice, as each season brings with it the mystique of this life-giving element.

Why I like this book:

Miranda Paul’s engaging brief and lyrical text sings off the pages. The rhyming is very clever. Children will relate to the brother and sister as they experience water in its many forms throughout the year. I especially like that the brother and sister in the story are biracial with a diverse group of children joining them as they splash in puddles, glide on ice, build snowmen, throw snowballs, squish in mud after snow melts, pick apples, press apple cider and jump into ponds. This is a fascinating introduction to the water cycle for young children. Jason Chin’s lively and expressive watercolors contribute significantly to the beauty of Water Is Water. This is an exceptional pairing of text with illustrations.

Resources: Paul includes extensive backmatter about the movement and change of water from liquid to vapor and fog, to precipitation, to ice and so on. This information will compliment classroom lesson plans.

Miranda Paul has traveled to Gambia as a volunteer teacher, a fair-trade and literacy advocate, and freelance journalist.  She is also the author of One Plastic Bag: Isatou Ceesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia  (read my review) and Water is Water, both of which were named Junior Library Guild selections. Visit Miranda Paul at her website.

Imani’s Moon

Imani's Moon9781934133576_p0_v1_s260x420Imani’s Moon

JaNay Brown-Wood, Author

Hazel Mitchell, Illustrator

Charlesbridge Publishing, Fiction, Oct. 14, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Maasai tribe, Maasai mythology, Moon, Belief and doubt, Self-confidence, Determination

Opening: “Imani was the smallest child in her village.”

Book Synopsis: Imani may be the smallest child in her Maasai village, but she is big in heart. The more she hears the ancient stories of her people, the more she longs to do something great. Imani wants to touch the moon, like Olapa, the moon goddess of Maasai mythology. Despite the teasing from village children, Imani isn’t about to give up on her dream.

What I like about this book:

JaNay Brown-Wood’s heartwarming story is filled with hope, ambition and big dreams. Even though Imani is tiny, she is strong in spirit. She endures the teasing of the village children daily. But they don’t deter her. For Imani there are no limitations, only possibilities and dreams to touch the moon. This richly textured story is charming, magical and begs to be read repeatedly. Hazel Mitchell’s cover with Imani’s outstretched arms in front of the big moon is engaging and draws the reader into Imani’s story. Her vibrant watercolor and graphite artwork includes a lot of Maasai detail.  The night scenes of Imani and the moon are dazzling and magical. Great collaborative work between the author and illustrator.

Resource: There is a lovely Author’s Note about the culture of the Maasai people living on the plains of Tanzania and Kenya. Passing along stories and mythology is an important part of the culture. You may want to visit JaNay Brown-Wood at her website. She has a Teaching Guide available for teachers and parents.

I’m a Great Little Kid Series

I’m a Great Little Kid series

Today I’m sharing three books of the new I’m a Great Little Kid series, co-published by Second Story Press and BOOST Child Abuse Prevention & Intervention. Never Give Up, Reptile Flu and Fifteen Dollars and Thirty-Five Cents, are the first of six planned picture books for kids aged 5-8 to teach important lessons about communication, self-esteem, and self-confidence. Many of the same characters appear in each book. Written by Kathryn Cole with colorful illustrations by Quin Leng, the series will have a Facilitator’s Guide, which will be published with the final book in the series.  This is an important series that can be used to teach character education in the classroom.

Never Give Up9781927583609_p0_v1_s260x420Never Give Up: A Story about Self-esteem

April 2015

Synopsis: Nadia looks on as her friend, Shaun, struggles to ride his bicycle in the park — with training wheels. A group of kids laugh and tease Shaun about riding his “tricycle” and watch him take a spill. Shaun picks up his bike and tries again and again, each time crashing.  Nadia feels badly that she isn’t a good friend and doesn’t stand up to the taunting, but she offers to help him. Determined to not to give up, Shaun manages to impress his friends, win their respect and feel like a king.

Reptile FluuntitledReptile Flu: A Story about Communication

May 2015

Synopsis: Kamal is studying reptiles at school. His teacher announces a surprise class trip to visit a reptile show at the museum. Everyone cheers, except Kamal. He’s terrified of live reptiles, especially snakes. But he’s even more afraid of admitting his fear to anyone, including his teacher. What if his friends tease him? He unsuccessfully tries to get out of the trip by telling his parents and sister about his fear, but they are too busy to listen. At the last-minute Kamal finds a way communicate his fear with surprising results.

Fifteen51hWwUW+0KL__SY498_BO1,204,203,200_Fifteen Dollars and Thirty-Five Cents: A Story about Choices

September 8, 2015

Synopsis: Joseph and Devon are good friends at school. Joseph spots money on the playground and yells to Devon, “I’m rich!”  Joseph wants to keep the money, “finder keepers.” Devon thinks someone may have lost the money and wants to take it to the office and help find its owner. They spot Claire and Lin searching the playground; Lin was crying because she lost her money. During class, the teacher asks why Lin is so sad. Joseph shoots Devon a look to not tell. Will Devon be able to convince Joseph to do the right thing?

Kathryn Cole has spent a forty-five-year career in children’s books as an illustrator, art director, editor, designer, and publisher at Scholastic, OUP, Stoddart Kids and Tundra Books. Her experience along with 13 years of volunteering for BOOST give her a strong understanding of the issues children face every day. She is co-managing editor at Second Story Press in Toronto.

Qin Leng has illustrated a number of children’s books. She was born in Shanghai, China and lived in France before moving to Montreal. She always loved to illustrate the innocence of children and has developed a passion for children’s books. She has created art for many award-nominated picture books.

Beautiful Moon: A Child’s Prayer

Beautiful Moon9781419707926_p0_v1_s260x420Beautiful Moon: A Child’s Prayer

Tonya Bolden, Author

Eric Velasquez, Illustrator

Abrams Books for Young Readers, Fiction, Nov. 4, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Prayer, Bedtime, City and town life, Compassion, Kindness

Opening: The amber orb floats, washing the night with a radiant glow. Stars hide. Only city lights glitter. It’s not a silent night. Car horns beep and blare. There is music in the air. And someone calls out, “I love you!”

Book Jacket Synopsis: A young boy wakes. He has forgotten to say his prayers.  Outside his window, a beautiful harvest moon illuminates the city around him and its many inhabitants. As the moon slowly makes its way across the heavens, the boy offers a simple prayer for the homeless, for the hungry and for others.

What I like about this book:

  • The narrative is simple and straightforward.  It is very inspirational, comforting and heartwarming, more than it is religious.
  • There is a balance of diversity.
  • The boy’s sincerity carries a powerful message. It is important for children to see how the boy focuses his prayers on social needs of today’s world before he focuses on his family, his teacher and his pet turtle.
  • This book will help parents have discussions with their kids about who is in need and who they may want to pray for.
  • Vasquez’s rich and beautiful illustrations are painted in oil. Each double-spread shows the moon in a different phase meaningful to the setting. As the boys prays for people with no homes, the sick to be healed or for wars to end, Vasquez highlights his prayers by showing a woman bundled up on a park bench, a man in a hospital bed and a soldier in a distant land.
  • This is a wonderful collaborative effort between the author and illustrator.

Tonya Bolden has written a number of highly regarded books for both children and adults. Maritcha: A 19th Century American Girl won a Coretta Scott King Honor Award and a James Madison Book Award. Her other books include Emancipation Proclamation, M.L.K. and Searching for Sarah Rector.

Eric Velasquez is the illustrator of numerous books, including My Uncle Martin’s Big Heart and My Uncle Martin’s Words for America, both by Angela Farris Watkins. He has received much praise for his work, including the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award and the Pura Belpre Honor for illustration.

Nobody!: A Story About Overcoming Bullying in Schools

Nobody9781575424965_p0_v1_s260x420Nobody!: A Story About Overcoming Bullying in Schools

Erin Frankel, Author

Paula Heaphy, Illustrator

Free Spirit Publishing, Fiction, May 15, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 5-9

Themes: Bullying, Differences, Accountability, Relational Aggression, Self-confidence

Opening: I used to like school. But that was before somebody decided to make my life miserable. Before somebody named Kyle made me feel like a NOBODY!

Publisher Synopsis: Thomas feels like no matter what he does, he can’t escape Kyle’s persistent bullying. At school, at soccer—nowhere feels safe! “Mom said Kyle would grow over the summer and stop picking on me, but he didn’t grow up, he just grew.” With support from friends, classmates, and adults, Thomas starts to feel more confident in himself and his hobbies, while Kyle learns the importance of kindness to others.

What I love about this book:

  • Erin Frankel and Paula Heaphy, who created the popular Weird series, have published a powerful stand-alone picture book for boys about bullying. Many of the beloved characters in the Weird, Dare and Tough, appear in the background of Nobody! 
  • Readers will identify with the name-calling, insults, threats, fear, and anger. The characters are realistic and the language is simple, but edgy.
  • Thomas narrates the story. We watch him grow from the victim who doesn’t like feeling like a nobody to a more self-confident somebody. I like how his narrative is accompanied with “bubble comments” from all the characters on each page. This allows the reader to be more engaged in the story dynamics as they hear from Thomas, the bully, siblings, parents, teachers and bystanders. The bully, Kyle, also learns a few lessons.
  • Nobody! is an excellent resource for teaching school-age children good emotional techniques to stand-up for what is right, to survive and grow beyond bullying. This is another book that belongs in every school library.
  • Paula Heaphy’s stand-out illustrations are pen and ink drawings with splashes of color. They are bold, expressive, emotive and capture the action in the story. I also like her use of white space. Children will find her illustrations especially appealing.

Resources: The book concludes with “activity club” pages for kids, as well as information to help parents, teachers, counselors, and other adults foster dialogue with children about ways to stop bullying. I would pair this book with the first three books, Weird, Dare and Tough.  Visit  Erin Frankel at her website.

The Adventures of Blue Ocean Bob: A Challenging Job

Blue Ocean Bob Challenges9780982961353_p0_v1_s260x420The Adventures of Blue Ocean Bob: A Challenging Job

Brooks Olbrys, Author

Kevin Keele, Illustrator

Children’s Success Unlimited LLC, Fiction, Apr. 14, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Pages: 54

Themes: Oceans, Sea life, Nature, Pursuing dreams, Positive attitude, Friendship, Confidence, Gratitude

Opening: On the Island of Roses, there once lived a lad / who was looking for more than the things that he had. / He discovered his passion to safeguard the sea / and finally knew what he wanted to be. / He adopted the nickname of Blue Ocean Bob / and decided to master this challenging job.

Book Jacket Synopsis: Blue Ocean Bob loves the sea and wants to dedicate his life to protecting it. He begins a new job as assistant to Mary Marine, the Island of Rose’s leading marine biologist, and with his hummingbird guardian, Xena, by his side, works hard to carry out his duties to the sea creatures both on and off the shore. When the challenges mount, Bob seeks advice from Doc the turtle, Earl the clam, and Wallace the walrus, who each help him to develop the positive attitude he needs to succeed.

What I like about this book:

  • Brooks Olbrys has written another dynamic ocean adventure about Bob, a boy on a journey to pursue his dream of becoming a marine biologist and protecting all life in the Sea of Kerchoo. Bob is a great role model for children.
  • Although Blue Ocean Bob: A Challenging Job is a chapter book for emerging readers, it also can be read as a picture book to younger children. There is a special rhythm to the text and there is breathtaking artwork on every page.
  • The plot is strong and packed with adventure as Bob overcomes many hurdles.  Each chapter presents a different challenge for Bob: training a young seal to swim, hunt and survive on her own; clearing garbage floating near the pier and accidentally entangling a pelican in his net; warning the whales and dolphins that a storm is brewing; missing his marine science class and almost giving up; and freeing a stingray from a fishing line in deep waters.
  • The characters are realistic, believable and endearing. Xena is a a great sidekick, warning Bob about dangers (metaphor for Bob’s doubt) and adding some comic relief. Bob learns valuable lessons about forgiveness, confidence, communications and gratitude.
  • Kevin Kelle’s vibrant and rich illustrations of the ocean and sea life fill every page. They are engaging and draw the reader into the story. Make sure you check out the end pages to view a map of the Island of Roses.

Resources: Parents and teachers can download a free activity guide on The Adventures of Blue Ocean Bob website. You can preview the first chapter of the book for free and view a trailer for the first book in the series. This is a unique series because Olbrys has used “timeless principles of achievement,” to encourage children to dream big — Think it. See it. Believe it. Achieve it.

Voices Are Not for Yelling

Voices Are Not for Yelling9781575425016_p0_v1_s260x420Voices Are Not for Yelling

Elizabeth Verdick, Author

Marieka Heinlen, Illustrator

Free Spirit Publishing, Nonfiction, April 20, 2015

Suitable for Ages:  Board Book, 0-3, Paperback, 4-7

Themes: Children learning how to use their indoor and outdoor voices

Opening: What do you use your voice for? Talking “Hi!” Asking questions “How are you?” Telling jokes. Laughing . . . Ha, ha! Singing, la, la, la!”

Book Jacket Synopsis:  As every grown-up knows, yelling comes naturally to children. This friendly book introduces and reinforces where and when to use an “indoor voice” or and “outdoor voice.” Simple words and vivid illustrations show the places and times for an indoor voice, the ways people ask us to speak more quietly, and situations when yelling might occur.  Children learn how they can quiet their voices and talk about a problem, supported by a simple reminder: “Think before you yell, and use your words well!”

Why I like this book:

  • This book is available in two versions, a board book for children 0-3 years of age who haven’t gained control of their emotions, and a longer and more in-depth paperback for children 4-7 years of age.
  • The author uses simple words to show children when and where they should use an indoor voice (in a library, classroom, car, movie theater) and an outdoor voice (playing outside, laughing).
  • With toddlers, frustration, yelling, screaming and throwing tantrums are normal.  The book will help small children understand why it’s better to use an indoor voice so people “will hear their words and not the yelling.” It will also teach them how to calm down and ask for help so they can get what they need.
  • Preschool and primary school children will benefit from the paperback book, as they are more advanced and socially conscious of those around them. They will be more likely to understand the concepts being encouraged and how yelling can have an impact on others. They are asked simple questions about what is happening inside them when their voices get louder and louder.
  • Marieka Heinlen’s illustrations are simple, bold, colorful and lively. Every page has a different groups of characters that are diverse and expressive.  The cover on the paperback book is priceless as it quickly identifies what happens when a child yells.
  • The board book is a must for parents with toddlers and the paperback book is perfect to have on hand in the classroom.

Resources: The book alone is a resource with many useful tips for parents and teachers to practice with children. And there are quiet-time gestures that children can learn.  Voices Are Not for Yelling is part of Free Spirit’s the Best Behavior series.  Below are titles in both board and paperback books.

Elizabeth Verdick is the author of more than 40 books for children and teens, including the Best Behavior series, the Happy Healthy Baby and Toddler Tools board book series, and the Laugh and Learn series for preteens. She has written Stand Up to Bullying! and The Survival Guide for Kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders (And Their Parents). 

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