Horse Raid – Multicultural Children’s Book Day

 

Multicultural Book MCBookDay-white-21-300x234

January 27, 2015

Today I am a book reviewer for the Multicultural Children’s Book Day. It was founded “to spread the word and raise awareness about the importance of diversity in children’s literature.” Please check out the resources and websites listed at the end of my review.

Horse Raid 9781937786250_p0_v2_s260x420Horse Raid: The Making of a Warrior

Paul Goble, Author and Illustrator

Wisdom Tales Press, Fiction, June 2014

Pages: 44 hardcover

Finalist: Best Books Award 2014

Suitable for Ages: 6 and up

Themes: Native Americans of the plains, Horse raids, Culture, Coming of age, Warriors, Multicultural

Opening: “Be patient, my son, there is no hurry; the horses of our enemies, the Crows, will not walk away. They will be there next summer and the summer after.” My father’s answer was the same whenever I asked if I could go with the warriors to capture horses.

Publisher Synopsis: Young Lone Bull dreamed of becoming a warrior. For the tribes of the American plains in the Buffalo Days of pre-reservation life, horse raiding was a chance for men to show their courage and bravery in battle. But Lone Bull’s father had just refused to let him join the horse raid! How could he become a warrior if he remained at home? With the help of his grandfather, Lone Bull sneaks off to follow the other warriors. But will it all end in disaster?

What I like about this book:

  • It is written and illustrated by master storyteller Paul Goble, who has been drawn to the history, spirituality, culture and tales of Native Americans since he was a young child.
  • This new edition of Goble’s Lone Bull’s Horse Raid, was first published in 1973.  It features digitally enhanced artwork, completely revised text, and a new appealing layout.  You will want to spend time pouring over the intricate detail in of Goble’s signature illustrations rendered in earth tones. Goble’s use of white space adds to the simplicity and elegance of his colorful artwork.
  • This timeless coming-of-age story about a 14-year-old Sioux boy eager to become a warrior, will capture the hearts and imaginations of both children and adults alike. It is a rich experience of what life is like for a boy living on a reservation on the plains and what it takes to survive.
  • Horse Raid is a powerful and exciting tale right from the start. The narrative imparts a wealth of historical information and detail for those thirsty for folktales about Native Americans living on the plains. For instance I didn’t know that horse raids were the cause for most wars and served an honorable purpose among the different tribes.
  • The plot is engaging and packed with tension and action. Great pacing keeps readers in suspense throughout the story — especially during the horse raid.
  • The characters are well-developed. Lone Bull is an eager and determined boy who wants to prove his bravery and earn a place among his tribe.
  • I would classify this book as a chapter book, but it is an excellent book for parents and children to read and discuss together.

Horse RaidGoble 2

Resources: Make sure you read the Forward by Joseph Bruchac and the Author’s Note, which prepares the reader for horse raiding and its role among Native American tribes. Lone Bull was a Sioux Indian living on the Great Plains. Ask children if they lived with Lone Bull how would they hunt for food? What kind of home would they live in? What name would they choose for themselves? What would they name their horse? What brave thing could they do?  Have them draw pictures of themselves, and their horses, homes and village.  Educators may want to visit some of the following websites: Native American Indians Themes, Lessons, Printables and Teaching Ideas and American Indian Heritage Teaching Resources (Smithsonian Education).

Paul Goble is an award-winning author and illustrator of over 40 children’s books. He has created an outstanding body of work including his book, The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses, which won the prestigious Caldecott Medal, as well as Buffalo Woman, and Mystic Horse.

Joseph Bruchac is best known for his work as a Native writer and storyteller, with more than 120 books and many awards to his credit

Here are some ways you can help us celebrate Multicultural Children’s Book Day: 

  • Visit The Multicultural Children’s Book Day website (click on Blog) and view the book lists, reading resources and other useful multicultural information.
  • Visit the Multicultural Books for Kids Pinterest Board for more reading ideas.
  • Have children bring in their favorite multicultural book to school on this day and share it with the class.
  • Watch for the #ReadYourWorld hashtag on social media and share. They are hosting a Twitter party! Join them on Jan 27th 9:00pm EST. Use hashtag: #ReadYourWorld to win 10 book packages.
  • Visit the Diversity Book Lists and Resources for Educators and Parents on their website.
  • Visit MCCBD sponsors. You can find them HERE
  • Connect with them on their new Facebook and Twitter  pages.

MCCBD’s 2015 Sponsors include Platinum Sponsors: Wisdom Tales Press, Daybreak Press Global Bookshop, Gold Sponsors: Satya House, MulticulturalKids.com, Author Stephen Hodges and the Magic Poof, Silver Sponsors: Junior Library Guild, Capstone Publishing, Lee and Low Books, The Omnibus Publishing. Bronze Sponsors:Double Dutch Dolls, Bliss Group Books, Snuggle with Picture Books Publishing, Rainbow Books, Author FeliciaCapers, Chronicle Books Muslim Writers Publishing ,East West Discovery Press.

I received my copy of this book from the publisher Wisdom Tales Press. This review reflects my own honest opinion about the book.

Rain Reign – Middle Grade

Rain Reign9780312643003_p0_v2_s260x420Rain Reign

Ann M. Martin, Author

Feiwel and Friends, Fiction, Oct. 7, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 9-12

Winner:2015 Charlotte Huck Award Winner

Themes: Animals, Autism Spectrum, Homonyms, Separation, Friendship, Family Relationships, Bravery, Hope

Pages: 223

Opening: “I am Rose Howard and my first name has a homonym. To be accurate, it has a homophone, which is a word that’s pronounced the same as another word but spelled differently My homophone names is Rows.

Book Jacket Synopsis: Rose Howard is obsessed with homonyms. She’s thrilled that her own name is a homonym, and she purposely gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms (Reign, Rein) which, according to Rose’s rules of homonyms, is very special. Not everyone understands Rose’s obsessions, her rules, or the other things that make her different–not her teachers, not other kids, and not her single father. When a storm hits their rural town, rivers overflow, roads are flooded, and Rain goes missing. Rose’s father should not have let Rain out. Now Rose has to find her dog, even if it means leaving her routines and safe places to search.

Why I like this book: Rain Reign is told from Rose’s point of view. Superb storytelling by Ann Martin who helps her readers experience Rose’s high-functioning mind as she navigates her autistic world. This is not a story about disability, or autism, but a story about a fifth grader who uses her unique abilities and strengths to break some of her rules and routines to search for her lost dog, Rain. Martin’s narrative is seamless and gripping.  Her characters are believable with strong personalities, characteristics and quirks. The story is as captivating and creative as it is heartbreaking. It is set in a small rural town that is ravaged by a hurricane. The plot is well-paced with just the right amount of tension to keep readers intrigued, engaged and guessing. This is a realistic story that is emotionally honest and filled with heart.

Ann M. Martin is the author of Ten Rules for Living with My Sister, Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life, and Everything for a Dog, all from Feiwel and Friends. She won a Newbery Honor Award for A Corner of the Universe, and is the author of the beloved Baby-sitters Club series.

Star Bright

Star Bright9781416958581_p0_v2_s260x420Star Bright: A Christmas Story

Alison McGhee, Author

Peter H. Reynolds, Illustrator

Atheneum Book for Young Readers, Fiction, Sep. 30, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Nativity: Nativity, Baby Jesus, Angels, Gifts, Christmas

Opening: “It was the end of December, and a baby was soon to be born. A baby! In the heavens, angels turned light with joy. On Earth, travelers prepared gifts.”

Book Jacket Synopsis: A baby is soon to be born, and the heavens are all abuzz. Yet one small angel peers down fretfully…What gift can she give this most important baby when the winds, the birds, and even the Magi are already bringing such wondrous treasures? With a heart so big, in a night so dark, she takes a big leap — and gives the most shining gift of all.

Why I like this book: Alison McGhee has written a kid-friendly story about a traditional story that will delight young readers. Written in very simple language, she truly captures the joy and spirit of Christmas and its meaning. This is a book that you can read to children or encourage them to read on their own because of the sparse text. Peter H. Reynolds has given this book a more contemporary look with his signature illustrations. The little angel is dressed in flight gear and goggles, checks out her computer to watch what gifts are being given to the new child.  The artwork is lively, whimsical, joyful, and compliments the story.  This book is a treasure and children will read it again and again

Alison McGhee is the New York Times bestselling author of Someday, Little Boy,  Bye-Bye Crib, Always, and A Very Brave Witch. Her other children’s books include All Rivers Flow to  the Sea, Countdown to Kindergarten, Snap and the Julia Gillian series.  Visit McGhee’s website.

Peter H. Reynolds has written and illustrated The Smallest Gift of Christmas, The Dot, Ish, North Star, Sky Color, and I’m Here, as well as collaborated on the Judy Moody series by Megan McDonald, and books with Judy Blume and Alison McGhee. Visit Reynolds’ website.

Positive

Positive9780062342515_p0_v4_s260x420Positive

Paige Rawl with Ali Benjamin, Authors

Harper Collins, Memoir, Aug. 26, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 12-16

Themes: Paige Rawl, HIV-positive children, AIDS in adolescence, Bullying, Suicide, Hope

Book Synopsis: Cheerleader, soccer player, honor roll student. One of the good kids at her middle school. Then on an unremarkable day, Paige disclosed the one thing that made her “different”: her HIV-positive status. Within hours, the bullying began.  They called her PAIDS. Left cruel notes on her locker. Talked in whispers about her and mocked her openly. She turned to school administrators for help. Instead of assisting her, they ignored her urgent pleas…and told her to stop the drama. She had never felt more alone. One night, desperate for escape, Paige found herself in front of the medicine cabinet, staring at a bottle of sleeping pills. That could have been the end of her story. Instead, it was only the beginning.

Why I like this book: Paige Rawl and Ali Benjamin have written a realistic, raw, brave and powerful memoir about a teen living with HIV since birth. Although Paige is stable on medications, HIV is such a sensitive subject and tough diagnosis for a teen to deal with — especially when her best friend betrays her. Once Paige’s secret spreads like wildfire at school, the bullying begins. This is one of the best memoirs I’ve read this year. It is a real page turner that I could not put down. Although what happens to Paige is heartbreaking, her courage to reclaim herself and move forward is inspiring. You will find yourself rooting for Paige as she finds a voice she didn’t know she had. Her memoir is written in short chapters and is well-paced. Her voice is strong and determined. In sharing her story, she encourages other teens to find their inner strength in the midst of any storm. And her experience has made a difference for others.

Resources: There is extensive information and facts about HIV, bullying and suicide.  She shares information on programs for kids who are touched by HIV/AIDS, a National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and programs to stop bullying.

The Whispering Town

The WhisperingTown9781467711951_p0_v1_s260x420The Whispering Town

Jennifer Elvgren, Author

Fabio Santomauro, Illustrator

Kar-Ben Publishing, Historical fiction, 2014

Suitable for ages: 7-11

Themes: Denmark, German Occupation, Jews, Holocaust, World War II

Opening: “There are new friends in the cellar, Anett,” Mama said when I woke up. “Time to take breakfast down to them.”

Book Jacket Synopsis: It is 1943, in Nazi-occupied Denmark. Anett and her parents are hiding a Danish Jewish woman and her son, Carl, in their cellar until a fishing boat can take them across the sound to neutral Sweden. Worried about their safety, Anett thinks of a clever and unusual plan to get them safely to the harbor.

Why I like this book: The Whispering Town is based on a true story. Jennifer Elvgren’s text is simple and will teach children about the Holocaust and the heroes who risked their lives to help. It is a great introduction book to the Holocaust. This is a compelling story about the courage and compassion of a girl, her family and village to defy the Nazis and house and guide Danish Jews to Sweden. The story is narrated by the main character, Anett, who is very mature and learns to keep a very big secret. Anett is courageous and clever. She knows how to sneak extra food from the right people who are helping on the underground. When the Nazis begin knocking on doors, the stakes rise. The Jews must be moved. A problem occurs when it is too dark to sneak the Jews through the town. The villagers like Anett’s idea and “whisper” the Jews to the fishing boats. Fabio Santomauro’s artwork suggests an air of secrecy with his dark and muted tones and black lines. This is an important book to add to a school library as it focuses on the courage of a community.

Resources: Visit Jennifer Elvgren at her website. Kar-Ben Publishing has resources on the Holocaust. It is growing Jewish library for children.

Dash

Dash9780545416351_p0_v1_s260x420Dash

Kirby Larson, Author

Scholastic Press, Fiction, Aug, 26, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes: Japanese-American Children, Evacuation, Relocation, Concentration Camps,  Dogs, WW II

Synopsis: After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Mitsi Kashino is separated from her home, friends, schoolmates, community and her beloved dog, Dash. There is a lot of fear in America. Because Mitsi is of American-Japanese descent, she and her family are forced to pack their suitcases and are evacuated from their home.  They are relocated to two different concentration camps that are overcrowded, unhealthy, and surrounded by tall fences. Mitsi is forced to leave her dog, Dash, with Mrs. Bowker, an older neighbor who cares for him. Mrs. Bowker sends Mitsi weekly letters from Dash. Mitsi’s strong family ties and her letters from Dash give her hope that one day she will be reunited with her pet.

Why I like this book: Kirby Larson has created a strong heart-felt connection for her readers with Mitsi’s attachment to Dash. Dash adds an authentic touch to this deeply emotional story about a dark period in America’s history. Larson shows Mitsi going to school, playing with her two best friends until the attack occurs on Pearl Harbor occurs. Mitsi feels the prejudice from her best friends who begin to bully her with facial expressions, racial slurs and nasty notes. Larson’s characters are well-developed. Mitsi’s voice remains determined  and strong even when she’s struggling and balancing so many issues. She finds solace in her artwork and writing.  Larson’s depiction of life at the internment camps is very realistic with over-crowded living conditions, long lines, heat, dirt, fleas, smelly latrines,  and minimal food (oatmeal and Vienna Sausages). The plot is engaging, heartbreaking, and packed with adventure. Larson’s powerful story is based on the true story of Mitsue “Mitsi” Shiraishi, who loved her dog, Chubby and left him behind with a neighbor, who wrote the real “Mitsi” letters from Chubby. I highly recommend this important story about the resilience of the human spirit.

Kirby Larson is the acclaimed author of the 2007 Newbury Honor book Hattie Big Sky; its sequel, Hattie Ever After; The Friendship Doll; Dear America: The Fences Between Us; and Duke.  Visit Kirby Larson at her website.

Brown Girl Dreaming

Brown Girl Dreaming9780399252518_p0_v2_s260x420Brown Girl Dreaming

Jacqueline Woodson, Author

Nancy Paulsen Books, Memoir, Aug. 28, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 10 and up

Themes:  Jacqueline Woodson, Childhood, Family relationships, Living in the north and south, Finding one’s voice, From girl to author

Pages: 366

Opening“I am born on a Tuesday at University Hospital/Columbus, Ohio./USA– a country caught/ between Black and White.”

Synopsis: Jacqueline Woodson shares what it is like to grow up in the 1960s and 1970s in both Brooklyn, NY and Greenville, SC.  The south is home for Jacqueline and her brother and sister as they spend the summers with their grandparents. Children tease Jacqueline and her siblings about their northern accents. She struggles with the subtle prejudices in the South as her  awareness of the civil rights movement grows. In Greenville there are loving grandparents, friends, and a lot of love. In Brooklyn she’s teased about being a Jehovah Witness and having to follow rules that her  friends don’t understand. And living in the shadow of her sister’s academic performance in school presents another challenge. Jacqueline has difficulty with schoolwork. It is through her poetry and storytelling that a teacher tells  her “You’re a writer.” Jacqueline’s voice begins to grow stronger with each word she pens because she wants to believe.  Readers will find Jacqueline Woodson’s journey to become an author engaging and inspiring.

Every dandelion blown

each Star light, star bright,

The first star I see tonight.

My wish is always the same.

Every fallen eyelash

and first firefly of summer…

The dream remains.

What did you wish for?

To be a writer.”

What I like about this book: Brown Girl Dreaming is a deeply personal and authentic memoir for teens struggling with race, prejudice, absent fathers, and finding their place in the world. Jacqueline Woodson’s determined and uplifting voice is eloquent. Her use of free verse compliments the theme in her memoir.  Her story is lyrical, emotional, and powerful. Each page is a clever, lively or soulful poem about a growing girl’s identity; her struggle with reading, a love of stories, and a desire to become a writer. She gives her readers hope and the sweet taste of what it’s like to follow your dreams.

Jacqueline Woodson is the winner of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults, the recipient of three Newberry Honors for After Tupac and D Foster, Feathers and Show Way, and a two-time finalist for the National Book Award for Locomotion and Hush.  Other awards include the Coretta Scott King Award and Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Miracle’s Boys. Visit Jacqueline Woodson at her website.