Maya’s Blanket – La Manta De Maya

Maya's Blanket 61M7G-JNf9L__SX445_BO1,204,203,200_Maya’s Blanket/La Manta De Maya

Monica Brown, Author

David Diaz, Illustrator

Children’s Book Press, an imprint of Lee & Low Books, Fiction, Aug. 15, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Bilingual, Blanket, Creativity, Recycling, Family traditions and relationships, Love, Latino, Multicultural

Opening: “Little Maya Morales had a special manta that she loved very much. The blanket was blue and green, with purple butterflies that Abuelita had stitched with her own two hands when Maya was just a baby.”

Synopsis: Maya’s grandmother stitches a beautiful blanket for her as a baby and she loves her manta very much. The blanket becomes worn and Maya helps her Abuelita sew a new dress from the fabric. When Maya outgrows the dress, they make a skirt for her to wear. Over time the skirt is repurposed into a shawl, a scarf,  and a bookmark. One day Maya loses her bookmark and finds a creative way to keep alive the memory of her beloved manta.

Why I like this book:

Monica Brown’s heartwarming story celebrates family traditions, love, creativity, and recycling.  It is bilingual, written in both English and Spanish on double-spread pages.  The English text is sprinkled with Spanish words.

Children will delight in the use of repetition each time the blanket is made into another item and will chime along as you read, “So with her own two hands and Abuelita’s help, Maya made her falda (skirt) that was her vestido (dress) that was her manta into a rebozo (shawl) that she loved very much.” They will also have fun predicting what happens next.

This beautiful Latino story is based on a traditional Yiddish folk song about a coat that is remade into something else. In writing the story, Monica Brown honors both her Jewish and Latino heritage in her lyrical and lively storytelling. The ending is so charming, I won’t give it away.

David Diaz’s illustrations are richly textured, colorful, and bold. Each double-page spread conveys an energy that jumps off the pages. Children will enjoy watching Maya’s magical journey unfold through his artwork.

Resources:  There is a fun Author’s Note and Glossary of Spanish words in the back pages.  Children usually have a favorite blanket, stuffed animal or toy at home. Ask them share stories about their item. Encourage them to think about how they could reuse or recycle their favorite item into something else. Older children may want to write a story or a poem.

Monica Brown is the author of many award-winning picture books, including Marisol McDonald Doesn’t Match. Visit Monica Brown at her website.

Stickley Sticks To It!

StStickley Sticks9781433819117_p0_v1_s192x300ickley Sticks To It!: A Frog’s Guide to Getting Things Done

Brenda S. Miles, Ph.D., Author

Steve Mack, Illustrator

Magination Press, Feb. 28, 2015, Fiction

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Sticking with a task and seeing it through, Perseverance, Life Skills, Self-confidence

Opening: Meet Stickley. He’s a frog. Every day he wears shorts and a fancy bowtie.

Book Jacket Synopsis: Stickley the frog has the gift of stick-to-it-ness. His sticky toes help him stick to windows, ceilings and surfboards — even under plates! But Stickley’s toes aren’t the only way he sticks to things. His attitude helps him stick with projects — no matter how frustrating or hard they may be — so he can reach his goals.

Why I like this book:

This is a clever and upbeat story that introduces children to the idea of sticking with a task or challenge and seeing it through to completion. This ultimately helps children feel proud about what they are doing. There are many humorous examples of Stickley participating in a science fair, a spelling bee and giving a speech.  Some projects require Stickley to take his time, test his patience, make him look at what he’s doing from a different perspective, and sometimes start over.  This is an excellent book for teachers to use in the classroom with students. I can see many great questions and lively discussions with students. Steve Mack’s illustrations are colorful, whimsical and expressive. They are entertaining and add to the story’s appeal.

Resources: The book includes a lengthy Note to Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers with more information about perseverance and strategies for encouraging children to plan, take breaks, ask for help and work with others to complete a task.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Jars of Hope – Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2016

Multicultural Book MCBookDay-white-21-300x234January 27, 2016

Today I am a book reviewer for the Multicultural Children’s Book Day (MCCBD). The official hashtag is #ReadYourWorld. It was founded “to spread the word, raise awareness about the importance of diversity in children’s literature and get more of multicultural books into classrooms and libraries.” Please click on the highlighted link above to see all of 200+ book reviews.

Jars of Hope 9781491460726Jars of Hope

Jennifer Roy, Author

Meg Owenson, Illustrator

Capstone Young Readers, Biography, Aug. 1, 2015

Pages: 32

Suitable for Grades: 3-5

Themes: Irena Sendler, Jewish Children in the Holocaust, Poland, Rescue, Unsung Heroes, WW II

Opening: “Otwock, Poland, 1917 Irena noticed things. She noticed that some people were treated differently than others. Sometimes Irena’s father took her with him on his doctor’s visits. The children in the neighborhood where he treated patients spoke Yiddish. They also went to the Jewish Temple. Irena heard the mean things that others said about the Jewish people. Irena often played with the Jewish children.”

Publisher’s Synopsis: Amid the horrors of World War II, Irena Sendler was an unlikely and unsung hero. While many people lived in fear of the Nazis, Irena defied them, even though it could have meant her life. She kept records of the children she helped smuggle away from the Nazis’ grasp, and when she feared her work might be discovered, she buried her lists in jars, hoping to someday recover them and reunite children with their parents.

What I like about Jars of Hope:

  • Jennifer Roy has written a powerful and inspiring picture book biography about a woman who saw how badly the Polish Jews were treated by the Nazis and decided to help save 2,500 children from the Warsaw Ghetto during the Holocaust. Roy shines a light on a very dark and sad period of history.
  • Roy uses dates and places to alert the reader to significant happenings and the growing tension that surrounds Irena’s work. The reader gains insight into the child, Irena, who is troubled that Jews are treated differently from the gentiles. This exposure has a profound effect on Irena and later shapes her response by 1940, when she sneaks food, supplies and vaccines to Polish Jews in the ghetto. In 1942, she smuggles infants out the ghetto and finds them new homes in convents and with families.
  • This is a challenging topic to discuss with children. Roy’s storytelling of Jar’s of Hope is sensitive and uplifting.  It introduces children to the caring people who risked their lives to help the Jews during the Holocaust. There is both good and evil in the world. Irena and her helpers represent the kindhearted and heroic people who take a stand against the evil and choose to make a difference. Her story is one of hope and compassion, and showcases the very best of humanity.
  • Meg Owenson’s illustrations are hauntingly beautiful in their dark muted tones. They are expressive and perfectly capture the author’s intent of showing the danger and remarkable acts of Irena Sendler’s heroism.

Resources: There is an Afterword, Author’s Note and Glossary included in the back matter. Jars of Hope is a good read-aloud and discussion book for classrooms. Children will want to know what happens to the children who are saved. Will they be reunited with their families. Irena meets some of the children years later. Check out The Teacher’s Guide to the Holocaust, which is designed for elementary students.

The MCCBD team mission is to spread the word and raise awareness about the importance of diversity in children’s literature. Our young readers need to see themselves within the pages of a book and experience other cultures, languages, traditions and religions within the pages of a book. We encourage readers, parents, teachers, caregivers and librarians to follow along the fun book reviews, author visits, event details, a multicultural children’s book linky and via our hashtag (#ReadYourWorld) on Twitter and other social media.

Join the Twitter party (#ReadYourWorld) and book give-away on Wednesday night, January 27, from 9 p.m. – 10 p.m. EST. Multicultural, diverse and inclusive books will be given away every five minutes.

The co-creators of this unique event are Mia Wenjen from Pragmatic Mom and Valarie Budayr from Jump Into a Book/Audrey Press.

MCCBD 2016 Medallion Level Sponsors include: Platinum: Wisdom Tales Press, StoryQuest Books, Lil Libros Gold: Author Tori Nighthawk, Candlewick Press Silver: Lee and Low Books, Chronicle Books, Capstone Young Readers Bronze: Pomelo Books, Author Jacqueline Woodson, Papa Lemon Books, Goosebottom Books, Author Gleeson RebelloShoutMousePressAuthor Mahvash Shahegh, China Institute.org.

Multicultural Children’s Book Day has 12 amazing Co-Host and you can view them here.

*I received my copy of this book from the publisher Capstone Young Readers. This review reflects my own honest opinion about the book.

The King Cake Baby

King Cake Baby51lbtJiI-nL__SX392_BO1,204,203,200_The King Cake Baby

Keila V. Dawson, Author

Vernon Smith, Illustrator

Pelican Publishing Company, Fiction, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Themes: King cakes, Baby, Mardi Gras, New Orleans, Gingerbread boy adaptation

Opening: Once upon a time, an old Creole woman and an old Creole man lived in New Orleans. They wanted to celebrate Kings’ Day on January 6, so the woman decided to make a king cake.

Synopsis:  The old woman makes the dough for her king cake and fills it with a cinnamon-sugar filling and a cream-cheese icing. She forms the dough into an oval shape and places the cake into the oven to bake.  While the cake is baking she makes the green, purple and gold sugar sprinkles for the topping. When she goes to the kitchen drawer to retrieve the king cake baby to put inside the cake, baby jumps out and runs away. She chases the baby, but he taunts her, “No, ma Cherie! You can’t catch me, I’m the King Cake Baby!” This cheeky baby has many close encounters with people in a rollicking chase through the French Quarters on his way to the Mississippi River — until he stops to brag.

Why I like this book:

Keila Dawson has created a lively and entertaining retelling of a favorite tale that introduces children to the unique New Orleans culture and its annual Mardi Gras celebration. With lively Creole characters, skillful rhythm and pacing, fun dialect and repetitive language, children will all be chanting “No,  ma Cherie! You can’t catch me, I’m the King Cake Baby!” It’s a fun rhyme or song that builds suspense throughout the book. Dawson adds her own special twist to her king cake baby tale.

Vernon Smith’s colorful, bold and expressive comic-book-style illustrations will appeal to children as they beg to have the story read just one more time. Both Dawson and Smith capture this humorous tale along with the traditions of New Orleans in their wonderful collaborative effort.

The king cake baby escapes on January 6, the day of the Three Kings, a time when the people of New Orleans are baking and eating king cake at the start of Mardi Gras, which leads up to Lent.

Resources: There is and Author’s Note and an Easy King Cake recipe at the end of the story that you can bake with your children.  This book is also an excellent classroom book for teachers to jump-start conversations about Louisiana, the French and Creole dialects, the residents and their culture and traditions. Visit Keila Dawson at her website, where you will find a free study guide with lessons, activities and crafts.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Mango, Abuela, and Me

Mango, Abuela and Me 61mOUGgpH9L__SX425_BO1,204,203,200_Mango, Abuela, and Me

Meg Medina, Author

Angela Dominguez, Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Aug. 25, 2015

2016 Pura Belpré Honor Book medal for literature

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Themes: Aging grandparents,  Love, Family relationships, Learning a new language, Hispanic, Diversity

Opening: “She comes to us in winter, leaving behind her sunny house that rested between two snaking rivers.”

Book Jacket Synopsis: Mia’s “far-away” grandmother leaves behind her sunny house with parrots and palm trees to come live with Mia and her parents in the city. But when Mia tries to share her favorite bedtime story with Abuela, she discovers that Abuela can’t read the words.  Mia helps Abuela with her English while they cook, and Mia learns some Spanish, too. But it’s still hard for Abuela to learn the words she needs to tell Mia all her stories. So when Mia sees a parrot in the pet-shop window, she has the perfecto idea for how to help Abuela.

Why I like this book:

What a treat to review Meg Medina’s book, just after she received the 2016 Pura Belpré Honor Book medal for literature. Her heartwarming story about the bonds of love, family and culture is a testament to how important Latino books are for children.

Medina weaves her magic as she includes both Spanish and English words into her uplifting and endearing bilingual story about Mia finding a way to communicate with her Hispanic grandmother — especially since they share a bedroom together. Language barriers are likely a familiar issue for many multi-generational immigrant families.

Mia and Abuela’s memorable characters are artfully crafted. Mia is caring, creative and determined to find a way to bridge the communication gap and does so in a very clever and humorous way. (No spoilers.) Abuela is sad and homesick at first, until she begins to cook with Mia and learn new words. Both learn to be patient with each other.

The text is simple and lyrical, the plot engaging and timeless. The narrative is a springboard for Angela Dominguez’s lively, colorful and expressive illustrations which are a blend of  ink, gouache and marker. This is a lovely collaborative effort between Medina and Dominguez.

Resources: Children learn a second language very easily. No matter if your child is learning English or Spanish, you can teach them simple words. For instance, Mia makes words cards for her abuela and tapes them to the lamp, rug, door, phone, chair, blanket, pillow.  Teach your child to count and say the alphabet in Spanish or English. Visit this creative Bilingual Teaching Activities page for children on Pinterest.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Doylie to the Rescue: Saving Baby Monkeys in the Amazon

Doylie to Rescue 61yz1rq+bHL__SY427_BO1,204,203,200_Doylie to the Rescue: Saving Baby Monkeys in the Amazon

Cathleen Burnham, Author and Photographer

CrickettHollow Books, Nonfiction, April 2015

Suitable for Ages: 4-10

Themes: Amazon rain forest, Global kids, Youth activism, Wild animal rescue, Baby monkeys, Conservation and protection

Opening: “The Yagua Indian man crept through the Amazon rain forest in Peru. He had been hunting a family of red howler monkeys for hours. If he was successful, his family would eat meat that day. If not, they would go hungry.” 

Synopsis: Doyli, a 10-year-old girl with a big smile, lives in the Amazon rain forest. With the help of her family, they rescue and protect orphaned monkeys from hunters and thieves, nurse them back to health and release them to the wild when they are ready.

Why I like this book:

Cathleen Burnham has written a powerful and  inspiring true-story that carries a very strong message for children that they don’t have to be adults to make a difference. Doyli is proof of how one small act of caring can have an extraordinary impact in protecting wildlife.

This book engages readers in Doyli’s rehabilitation work from the start. It also includes a fascinating glimpse of every day life in the Amazon rain forest. Doyli does household chores, collects drinking water from the river for the family, takes a bath in the river, and travels with her brother in a dug-out canoe to school where she studies math, Spanish, and science. After school, Doyli nurtures the orphaned monkeys back to health with a special diet and her love.

I especially like how the author doesn’t judge the Yagua Indian for shooting a monkey with a poison dart. He’s only trying to feed his family. The same hunter discovers the monkey he shoots has a baby, which he delivers to Doyli’s home the next morning. He knows the baby will be cared for and released back to its natural habitat — a kind of cycle of life story. The story also shows a dark side, where Doyli discovers a man selling a spider monkey in the marketplace. With the help of the police, the man is arrested and Doyli takes the spider monkey home.

Every page of the book is filled with lush, beautiful and touching photographs that really SHOW every aspect of Doyli’s life in the Amazon, the delicate ecosystem  and the gorgeous endangered species living in the rain forest. Readers will also devour all the factual information.

Resources: To learn more about the amazing things Doyli and other children are doing to protect wildlife around the globe, visit the World Association of Kids and Animals (WAKA) and get involved. There is a special teacher’s guide available for classroom use. Make sure you read the Author’s Note about the story behind the story of finding Doyli and her family.

Cathleen Burnham is a journalist, writer and photographer. Doyli to the Rescue is the first “photodocumentary” book in a series of six forthcoming books for young readers that profile wildlife preservation efforts being undertaken by kids around the globe.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

The Reindeer Wish

The Reindeer Wish51K66-2f6xL._SX389_BO1,204,203,200_The Reindeer Wish

Lori Evert, Author

Per Breiehagen, Illustrator

Random House for Kids, Fiction, Oct. 6, 2015

Pages: 48

Suitable for Ages: 3-8

Themes: Christmas, Wishes, Reindeer, Arctic region, Nature, Adventure, Friendship

Opening: Long, long ago, far to the north and high in the snowy mountains, where you could ski for days and never see another soul, lived a kind little girl named Anja.

Synopsis: Anja wants a puppy for Christmas. School is out for the holidays and she is lonely. She writes a letter to Santa and places it in the postbox. After spending Christmas Eve skiing down her favorite snowy hill, Anja finds a wild baby reindeer abandoned under a tree. Her parents let her care for the little reindeer in the hay shed. Anja is thrilled with her gift and names the reindeer Odin.

Odin gets stronger daily. By spring, Odin’s antlers begin to grow. Anja and Odin become best friends and spend the summer exploring the budding countryside, the cascading waterfalls, and the mountains.

Anja roofTHE REINDEER WISH_@PER RBEIEHAGEN-19Photograph courtesy of Per Breiehagen

As winter returns early to the arctic, Anja teaches Odin to pull a sleigh. She begins with her little sled packed with heavy sacks. By Christmas, Anja decides Odin is ready to pull her father’s sleigh. They borrow the sleigh and search for the perfect Christmas tree to decorate for Santa. On another journey with Odin, Anja sees a herd of reindeer along a ridge. She wonders if Oden would be happier living with other reindeer. How could she give up her best friend? She knows she must make a decision.

Anja sledTHE REINDEER WISH_@PER RBEIEHAGEN-20Photograph courtesy of Per Breiehagen

Why I like The Reindeer Wish:

  • Lori Evert and her husband, Per Breiehagen, have teamed up to create their second enchanting and richly textured Nordic Christmas tale featuring their rosy-cheeked daughter, Anja. The Reindeer Wish is a magical tale of friendship, bravery and believing. It will give children something to wonder about.
  • The setting is realistic and contributes to the fairy tale charm. Anja is bundled up in authentic 18th century Norwegian clothing, reindeer boots, and slender wooden skis with straps. Her rustic log house has an earthen roof. The text is friendly and imparts information about nature and survival in the arctic.
  • I have shared some of the story, but I have not given away the unexpected ending that will delight both children and adults.
  • Award-winning photographer Per Breiehagen captures this beautiful story with his extraordinary photographs of breathtaking landscapes and playful scenes of Anja interacting with animals and nature. Readers will journey through the seasons in this story and experience the beautiful Northern Lights. Exquisite!
  • This is a beautiful collaborative effort by this husband and wife team, and their daughter Anja. Fans of The Christmas Wish and The Tiny Wish will want to add this heartwarming treasure to their collection. It will open their hearts to the magic and wonder of Christmas.

Anja ornamentTHE REINDEER WISH_@PER RBEIEHAGEN-21Resources: Visit the Random House for Kids for more information about the book. Click on the activity page and download The Reindeer Wish ornaments, a Santa wish list, a reindeer adventure page and coloring pages. Kids can also view a video and send a free Christmas e-card of their favorite photograph to  friends. Make sure you also visit The Christmas Wish website to see enlarged pictures of all three books.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.