Ice Dogs by Terry Lynn Johnson

IIce Doge9780547899268_p0_v1_s260x420ce Dogs

Terry Lynn Johnson

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Fiction, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 10-14

Themes: Sled dogs, Alaska, Wilderness, Survival, Grief

Opening: All eight of my dogs are stretched in front of me in pairs along the gangline. They claw the ground in frustration as the loudspeaker blares. “Here’s team number five. Our hometown girl, fourteen-year-old Victoria Secord!”

Synopsis:  Victoria is a dogsled racer in Alaska. Since the recent death of her father, who taught her everything she knows about being a musher, she pours herself into training her dogs and preparing for the White Wolf Classic. On a routine run, she comes across Chris who is injured in a snowmobile accident. A fast-approaching blizzard catches Victoria by surprise and covers her sled trails. She finds herself lost in the frozen wilderness with little food or protection. Her real race becomes one of survival against time. Will she be able to save Chris and herself?

Why I like this book: This inspiring and gripping story by Terry Lynn Johnson, is a page turner. Johnson, who once owned  and raced 18 Alaskan huskies, knows how beautiful, peaceful and unforgiving the wilderness can be. Reading a novel based on Johnson’s knowledge and experience makes for great realistic fiction and a very vivid setting. Her plot is fast-paced with high-adventure, danger, courage and hope. Her main characters, Victoria and Chris, are well-developed. The story is narrated by Victoria, a fiercely independent, strong, brave, and smart teen coping with the tragic death of her father in the wilderness. She is determined to carry on his legacy as a musher. Chris, a city boy from Toronto, offers a bit of comic relief. Their relationship is full of tension, emotion and complexity. He steps up to the plate and works with Victoria in a race for their survival. Ice Dogs is a spellbinding story that will appeal to young readers. Visit Terry Lynn Johnson at her website where you can view a video, read interesting information, and check out her blog.  Johnson is a conservation officer in Whitefish Falls, Ontario, Canada.

A special thank you to Amanda at Born Bookish, who first introduced me to Ice Dogs. Click on her blog to read her review.

Edmund Pickle Chin Blog Tour — A Donkey Interview

edmund-cover-600x900Edmund Pickle Chin: A Donkey Rescue Story

Clara Bowman-Jahn and Susan April Elwood, Authors

Lynne Bendoly, Illustrator

eTreasures Publishing, April 26, 2014

Suitable for ages: 4-10

Theme: Animal Rescue

Today you are in for a special treat. I am the fifth stop or the tail end of the donkey blog tour!  I have the pleasure of interviewing the star of the book, Edmund Pedro Pickle Chin Big Head Ed Elwood. He is 10 years old and lives at Everymay Farm, a non-profit rescue for farm animals in rural Georgia. It was founded by Susan and Tom Elwood in 2007. According to Susan,  Edmund stands watch over the smaller critters and has become their protectors. He even tolerates goat head blows to the chest and waits to eat until the other animals have finished. Susan says, he can also be quite comical when people are around. Although he is still very shy, he will  “curl his upper lip or blow donkey boogers on well-meaning visitors. What do  you expect, he’s an ass!”

I think it’s time to turn the  spotlight on Edmund and hear what he has to say.  So, here’s Edmund…

Edmund, you are such a charmer with that great big donkey smile. What do you think about having a book written about you?

[E] GREAT! I feel I should have hoof printed the contract, but feel really good about what Susan and Clara have created.  Susan tells me the book will raise children’s awareness of patience and compassion towards one another and animals. Plus, it will hopefully help my animal friends here on the farm, so it feels right.

Do you like your name?  Do you know words? Are you a celebrity in town?

[E] I LOVE my names. In fact I have many nicknames as you will find out in MY book! Which one I like best is a hard question. EDMUND, is probably my favorite. I know it and respond to it when Susan calls to me. That’s not the only word I know — cookie, apple, Lambert and “let’s get some grain.” This may not seem like a big deal to some of you, but I bet the goats don’t know that many words. We donkeys love to talk! As for being a celebrity, the farm isn’t open to the public, so my fans are limited. I am secretly waiting for my first fan mail!

What was it like for you to come to Everymay Farm? Were you afraid?

[E] I wasn’t sad to leave the last farm, because as the book tells, it wasn’t a very nice place for me. I was scared because I didn’t know if my new home would be better. I had been moved around before, and I wasn’t wanted at any of my past homes. After just one night at Evermay, I knew I was going to love it there. I wasn’t tied to a tree! I could run around if I wanted, and I did!!!

How long did it take for you to trust people?

I trust Susan, but I’m still nervous around strangers, especially the person who comes every so often and pokes me with needles “for my own good.”  Don’t get me started on the one that comes over with a sack full of tools used on my feet. I try really hard to put up with them because Susan is there, and she promises she’ll never to let anyone ever mistreat me again. I also have a friend named Scott who brings me apples. I bellow when I see his truck coming down the road and always meet him at the fence. He calls Evermay the “Hilton” for unwanted animals, but I don’t know what a Hilton is. I do know what it feels like to be wanted.

What is the favorite song that Susan sings to you? Do you have a favorite song for Susan?

[E] Can I be honest…she can’t sing. My ears are big and sensitive like a dog’s. That’s why when the train rolls by or a siren goes off, I bellow like a dog barks to block the high-pitched sound from hurting my ears. Her singing is kinda like that, but I know the kid means well. She makes up a song for every critter on the farm.

I’d probably bellow my version of My Girl, by “The Temptations.”  I‘ve got sunshine on a cloudy day…When it’s cold outside, I’ve got “EVERMAY.”

I think I could do a pretty good job with singing Aretha Franklin’s Rescue Me. For the most part though, Susan is the one who sings around here.

How did you feel when other animals started arriving at Everymay? Were you jealous, excited or anxious?

[E] I had been with other animals where I was before and I chased them. That is why my previous owners tied me to a tree. When Everymay started to grow and new animals arrived, I got excited. Susan taught me patience by introducing me to one new friend at a time. I’m always very excited to have furry friends!

I hear that you are an ambassador for the farm. What do you do?

[E] I’ve been called the poster child for Evermay. It turns out that I’m quite photogenic. My picture is used a lot on our Facebook page. I meet and greet critters and humans alike here on the farm. The picture book tells a little more about my duties as an ambassador. I don’t want to give to too much away!

Who are your best animal friends?

[E} Lambert the goat is my BFF. He arrived shortly after me and we hit it off right away. Well I might have gotten a little excited over his arrival at first, but I was still learning. I tried to get him to move up the field when he was only three months old. He wasn't moving fast enough, so I picked the little guy up by the tail. Susan was NOT happy. I wasn't allowed to be alone with Lambert for a very long time. I don't want Lambert to leave me again, so I won't do that anymore. If Lambert is taken away from me, I scream as loud as I can. And, he screams right back! My bellow can be heard a long distance by neighbors.

There is also a miniature mare I am quite fond of. Her name is Bella. We secretly meet by the fence under the elm tree. I could stand there for hours as long as she's there. She's so pretty!

What is the funniest thing that has happened to you?

[E] Flies can be very bothersome during Georgia’s hot summers. To help me, Susan bought me a donkey fly mask. When I wore it for the first few times, I had difficultly walking! I kept taking really high steps and even missed my footing. I had to learn to look past the mesh in the mask instead of at the mesh that was so close to my face. Susan said I looked like I had “a few too many.” I’m not sure what she meant by that. You can never  have too many apples.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

What is you favorite foods? How many time do you eat a day?

[E] I graze most of the day with my goat pals. We are fed grain and hay twice a day.  My favorite foods are apples and pears! Susan loves me so much that she planted pear trees. I also get carrots and ginger snaps made from the old family recipe. For the anniversary of my arrival to the farm every year I get a special dessert. This year it was carrot cake, last year apple muffins. In the summer I have watermelon, and I love to blow it out my nostrils when no one is expecting it!

What do you want to say to Susan and Clara?

[E] Thank you for giving me the chance to give back through this joint effort. It’s a grand story! I would also like to thank my illustrator Lynne Bendoly for making me look so adorable! And Susan, you scratch my left side more than the right.

Thank you for the interview. I appreciate your wanting to hear my side of this tale.

Hee Haw…Hee Haw…Hee Haw,

Edmund Pedro Pickle Chin Big Head Ed Elwood

Resources:

Clara Bowman-Jahn author photo(1)Authors Clara-Bowman Jahn and Susan April Elwood encourage you to read everyOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA post, follow the blog and comment for prizes. The reader who follows each blog and comments on each stop of the tour will get first prize. And if there are many winners, they will deliver!

First prize is a print book of both Edmund Pickle Chin and Clara’s Annie’s Special Day. Second prize is either a print copy of Edmund or of Annie, you get to pick and finally third prize is a copy of the ebook of Edmund Pickle Chin, a Donkey Rescue Story.

BLOG TOUR DATES

May 26 / animal abuse and mistreatment Joanna -www.joannamarple.com

May 29/ author collaboration Stacy – http://www.stacysjensen.com

May 30/ PPBF and review Vivian – http://viviankirkfield.com/

June 2/ author interview Erik – www.ThisKidReviewsBooks.com

June 4/ Edmund interview Patricia – http://childrensbooksheal.com

June 9 /teacher info and guide Susanna – http://susannahill.blogspot.com

 

The Truth of Me

The Truth of Me9780061998591_p0_v2_s260x420The Truth of Me

Patricia MacLachlan, Author

Katherine Tegen Books/Harper-Collins Publishers, Fiction, June 2013

Suitable for Ages: 6-10

Themes: Grandmothers, Dogs, Animals, Family Relationships

Opening: This is a true story. The truest story ever. You may not believe it. Your loss. But it’s true. I have a witness.”

Synopsis: Robbie’s musician parents send him and his dog, Ellie, to spend the summer with his grandmother Maddy. Robbie’s parents are so absorbed with their music that he feels unnoticed. But, he can be himself with Maddy and her relaxed way of living.  He loves listening to her stories about her adventures with animals in the woods, which no one else believes. Robbie is the only one who experiences Maddy’s gift with wild animals and how they trust her. Both Robbie and Ellie learn about the natural world through Maddy. And, Maddy shares a secret with Robbie about his mother that helps him understand his family dynamics and find “the truth of me.” With this information, Robbie finds the courage to make things right.

Why I like this book: This is a quiet book that celebrates family relationships and special gifts.  Patricia MacLachlan has written a story that is realistic, special and begging to be explored. She has a gift for writing about families and this book is no exception.  The characters are believable, the language is simple and easy for young readers, the narrative gentle and the plot engaging.  Every family has its secrets and kids will curl up with this heartwarming and emotional story as they experience the magic with Robbie and Ellie.  Patricia MacLachlan is a Newberry Medalist for her book Sarah, Plain and Tall.  I reviewed her powerful 2013 picture book about grief and renewal, Snowflakes Fall, which was dedicated to the families of Newtown and Sandy Hook, CT.

Henny

Henny9781442484368_p0_v11_s260x420Henny

Elizabeth Rose Stanton, Author and Illustrator

Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Book, Fiction Jan. 7, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Chickens, Individuality, Self-acceptance, Humor

Opening: “Henny was not a typical chicken. Henny was born with arms. Henny’s mother was very surprised, but she loved Henny anyway.”

Synopsis: It’s not every day that a chicken is born with arms. Henny likes being different…and she doesn’t like being different.  She tries to strut around like the other chickens and fit in, but Henny has to be herself. As she grows, she worries about being right-handed or left-handed….wearing long sleeves or short sleeves…using buttons or zippers…and needing deodorant. She helps the farmer by milking a cow, feeding the chicks and the pigs. She discovers she can cross her arms, brush her teeth, comb her comb, carry a purse hail a taxi and ice skate. But, can she do the one thing she want to do most — fly?

Why I like this book: In her debut picture book, Elizabeth Rose Stanton has written a fresh and lovable character in Henny.  This is a charming story about differences, self-acceptance and self-discovery. But it is also about a journey,  wonder and dreams. Kids will relate to Henny and laugh at her antics and cheer her as she slowly discovers that with arms she can experience the world in a way the other chickens can’t. Being different can have it’s pluses and nothing is going to stop this curious chick. The language is very simple and a great book for young readers. Stanton’s pencil and watercolor illustrations are lively, expressive and tickle the imagination. She is an author/illustrator to watch.

Resources: Encourage your child to be imaginative and draw some animals that wouldn’t normally have arms, or legs.  A fish with legs…a frog with arms…a bear with a beak and so on.  Doodling can be fun.  Check out Tara Lazar’s interview with Stanton last November and Joanna Marple’s illustrator’s interview with Stanton last September.  Stanton gives some insight into her artistic process.  You can visit Stanton on her website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

A Dog Called Homeless by Sarah Lean

Dog Called Homeless9780062122209_p0_v2_s260x420A Dog Called Homeless

Sarah Lean

Katherine Tegen Books, Fiction, 2012

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes:  Death of Parent, Grief, Dog, Hearing and Visual Impairment, Single-parent family

Awards: The 2013 Schneider Family Middle School Book Award

Book Jacket Synopsis:  When Cally Fisher says she sees her dead mother, no one believers her.  The only other living soul who sees Cally’s mom is a mysterious wolfhound who always seems to be there when her mom appears.  And when Cally stops talking — what’s the point if no one is listening — how will she convince anyone that her mom is still with them or persuade her dad that the huge silver-gray dog is their last link with her.

Why I like this book:  Sarah Lean has written a very sensitive and moving story about a girl dealing with the death of her mother.  She writes with a very clear, natural and empathetic voice.  Her story is about hope, friendship, determination and courage.  Her plot is strong with an unexpected twist at the end.  Lean does an outstanding job of developing the heart and soul of her characters.  When Cally stops talking for 31 days, this determined girl has her reasons.  She wants to remember and talk about her mother, who died in a car accident.  But her father wants to forget and move on.  Cally makes herself heard through her silence in a very unusual way.  Dog lovers will cheer for the wolfhound Homeless, who is very loveable.  This is a beautiful story for any child who has lost a loved one.   You may visit Sarah Lean at her website.

The Christmas Wish

The Christmas Wish14858500_201309121500The Christmas Wish

Lori Evert, Author

Per Breiehagen, Photographer

Random House, Fiction, Sept. 10, 2013

Suitable for Ages: 3-8

Themes: Christmas,  Arctic region, Tundra animals, Santa Claus, Adventure

OpeningLong, long ago, in a place so far north that the mothers never pack away the wool hats or mittens, lived a sweet little girl named Anja, who greatest dream was to become one of Santa’s Elves.

Synopsis:  Anja, who lives in the arctic region, dreams of being one of Santa’s elves.  She watches the position of the North Star at night and memorizes the great map  at school as she prepares for her trip. Leaving behind presents and a note for her family, she bundles in Nordic clothing and straps on her skis so she can travel through the deep snow. Along her way, a bird, a horse, a musk ox, a polar bear and a reindeer help Anja on her journey to find Santa Claus at the North Pole.

Evert_Breiehagen_Anja_--_credit_Per_Breiehagen_cropped_jpg_165x0_q85Why I like this book: Lori Evert has written an enchanting Nordic Christmas tale that is pure magic. The author was inspired to write the story when she saw an image of her daughter, Anja, with a reindeer.  Award-winning photographer Per Breiehagen captivated this beautiful story with his extraordinary photographs of breathtaking landscapes and touching scenes of Anja.  This was a beautiful collaborative effort by this husband-wife team, and their daughter Anja. The Christmas Wish is a treasure you will want to keep on your book shelf for years. Visit the The Christmas Wish website to see enlarged pictures of the book and a video.

Resources:  Visit Random House for more information about the book.  Click on the activity page at the top and you can download The Christmas Wish ornaments and find other winter activities.  Encourage your children to take winter pictures of animals and children romping in the snow

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

I Want Your Moo

I Want Your Moo9781433805424_p0_v1_s260x420I Want Your Moo: A Story for Children About Self-Esteem

Marcella Bakur Weiner and Jill Neimark, authors

JoAnn Adinolfi, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, 2010

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes:  Animals, Self-esteem, Sounds, Turkeys

Opening:  “Toodles the Turkey did not like herself.  Her legs were like sticks.  Her head had no hair.  Her feathers were brown.  But most of all, Toodles hated her sound.  Gobble-gobble. Gobble-gobble.  What a horrible noise!”

Synopsis:  Toodles doesn’t like the sound of her own voice and goes searching for a new sound.  She want’s Cathy the Cow’s strong  “Mooo-oooo-oooo.”  She wants Paris the Pig’s “Oink” and Harry the Horse’s “Neigh,” and the cat’s “Mee-oow.”  They all refuse.  But, Ralph the Rooster invites Toodles to join him in a duet of “Cocka-cocka! Doodle -doo!’ But, that didn’t go over well and Toodles runs away.  Defeated, Toodles runs into the very wise Omar the Owl “Whoo-whoo” gives her advice.  She wanders back into the barnyard, just in time to save the day with her Gobble-gobble.  Will Toodles ever be happy with her sound?

Why I like about this book:  Kids will have fun making all the wonderful animal sounds.  Weiner and Neimark have written a lively and lyrical book that will captivate young children.  This is a great book to add to your collection to boost your child’s self-esteem.  Adinolfi’s bright and colorful illustrations explode off each page.  The expressions she captures of the animals are hilarious.  Jill is also the author of Toodles and Teeny, which I reviewed last spring.

Resources:  There is a forward and back pages for parents talking about building a child’s self-worth and offering practical advice for guiding children toward self-acceptance.  This book offers so many teaching moments.  Have children act out the animal characters and draw pictures of Toodles and the other animals.  It is also a great classroom book.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Toodles and Teeny

Toodles9781433811982_p0_v1_s260x420Toodles and Teeny:  A Story About Friendship

Jill Neimark and Marcella Bakur Weiner, Authors

JoAnne Adinolfi, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, 2013

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Awards: 2012 Gold Medal Winner, Mom’s Choice Awards

Themes:  Building Healthy Friendships, Best Friends, Animals

Opening:  Toodles the Turkey had no best friend.  She had oodles of playmates/And all kinds of play dates with Cathy the Cow and Omar the Owl/With Streaky the Barn Cat/And Boo-Boo the Barn Bat.”

Synopsis:  Although Toodles has many friends who keep her busy, she feels lonely because she doesn’t have a best friend.  One day by the pond she meets Teeny, a tiny white turkey who is also lonely.  Toodles and Teeny spend the entire summer together eating berries and chestnuts, taking naps on the hillside, telling silly stories, fishing in the pond and chatting about everything.  Back in the barnyard, the other animals miss Toodles and wonder why she isn’t playing with them anymore.  They find Toodles and Teeny by the pond and are angry that they have been ignored all summer.  Will Toodles have to make a choice?

Why I like this book:   Jill and Marcella have written a very heartwarming book about the difficulties of childhood friendships.  All children will relate to this entertaining story.  The ending is very clever and satisfying.  Building friendships is important to a child’s growth and self-worth.  Children need to have both casual and fun friendships.  They also need to have at least one best friend.  JoAnn Adinolfi’s illustrations are colorful, bold, expressive and add to this engaging story.

Resources:  The authors have written helpful back matter for parents to use as a guide with their children.  Friendships are complicated and the author’s offer important tips for parents to help their children build healthy relationships.  Their suggestions can lead to good discussion material with children.  Check out friendships crafts that children can make.   Make sure you visit Jill Neimark’s website.  Jill is also the author of I Want Your Moo.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books

Devin and the Greedy Ferret

Debut author Leo B. Kennedy is proving that young adults with autism can find success in the world, including the field of children’s literature.  His book is not about autism, nor does it contain characters who have autism.   I share this with you first because of the inspiration I hope it may bring to the many talented young people on the ASD spectrum.  An interview will follow the review with Leo’s mother.

Devin and Greedy9781449784294_p0_v1_s260x420Devin and the Greedy Ferret

Leo B. Kennedy, Author

Chris Fowler, Illustrator

WestBow Press, Fiction, Feb. 20, 2013

Suitable for Ages:  8-12

Themes:  Kidnapping school mascot, Racing high-performance cars, Friendship

Synopsis:  Devin and his friends think it will be cool to kidnap the school mascot dog during a football game.  But when they try to hide from the police, Devin and his friends only find themselves in more trouble when they end up crashing their truck onto Frederick Ferret’s property. Frederick wants to impose  an extreme punishment on Devin’s friends.  The only way Devin can save them is by striking a deal with Frederick.  Devin travels with Frederick to Germany to drive a high-performance race car on the world’s most dangerous racetrack.   Will Devin save his friends when he’s terrified of extreme speed and nearly tosses his cookies on the first round?

Why I like this book:  Leo has written a very entertaining and fast-paced book with quirky and fun characters.   Leo loves race cars and has turned his passion for cars into this witty book for middle graders.  “I wanted characters that were daring, courageous, and funny,” says Leo.  “I also required that none of them walk on four legs.”  And they don’t.  Chris Fowler’s cartoon-like characters add to the humor of the book.  You can visit Leo B. Kennedy at his website where you can view a video trailer of his book and a video interview with Leo — both are very interesting.

I’ve asked Leo’s mother, Nan Kennedy, to talk about her son’s early years and answer some questions about his writing and publishing experience.  Leo is now 21-years-old.

Leo Kennedy1-IMG_3043Leo was diagnosed with autism at the age of two.  He had a number of difficulties throughout his childhood, and academic work was always difficult for him.  Finding teachers along the way who really appreciated Leo for his talents and sense of humor made a significant difference for him.   Leo generally didn’t perform well on standardized tests, often performing far below grade level.  However, a middle school teacher noticed that if Leo was allowed to take as long as he wanted on a subtest    where he would construct sentences out of random words, he actually performed beyond the graduate school level!  That finding was just a curiosity to me at the time.  But, when as a young adult he started writing a book, I remembered that sliver of ability, and it took on new meaning.

Did Leo like reading as a child?

[N] Leo has never been much of a reader, so it was a startling notion that he might write a book.   I encouraged him as much as possible, because it was what he wanted to do.   And, when I started seeing the finished chapters, my excitement began to rise.  This could be a real book!  There were engaging, funny characters, and exciting adventure, a plot with suspense, a couple of crisis points and a satisfying ending.

Was Leo involved in the entire process of publishing?

[N] Finishing the book was only the beginning.  Getting it edited, illustrated, published, and then marketed are tasks in which Leo has been heavily involved, but in which he need extensive support.   All of these activities are stretching him in ways neither of us initially expected.  He is learning how to respond to questions in an interview and is preparing a speech for his book launch party.  But he is stretching in other profound ways, such as agreeing to have his picture taken and videos made of him (after years of an obsessive avoidance of any camera), because he knows that people want to see what an author looks like.  He just went shopping with me for new clothes, because he now understands that an author can’t wear sweatpants to a book signing.

Has writing and publishing a book done anything for Leo’s confidence?

[N] Leo says “positive things, for sure.  In fact, it’s given me the confidence to write more books, including a special one.”  Leo is still secretive about his future books, so I can’t get him to tell me what the special one is about.  He also agrees that his role as a published author has given him greater confidence in social relationships and in pursuing his goal of living independently.  It’s been a long road, and there are still many challenges to face.  But Leo now sees a path for himself as an adult that he never did before.  He also wants to act as a role model for other young people on the autism spectrum in pursuing their dreams.

Parents have written about the travails of raising a child with autism, adults have written memoirs about their personal experiences on the spectrum, and recent novels have been written from the supposed perspective of a person with autism.  But where are the children’s fiction books written by a person who actually has autism?  This book demonstrates to children, whether on the spectrum or not, that people with autism have real skills and talents, but is also a sign post of hope to parents concerned about their own child’s future.

Thank you Nan for sharing your thoughts about Leo’s journey.  Leo keep writing!  To your success,  Patricia

Marathon Mouse

Marathon Mouse9781616089665_p0_v1_s260x420Marathon Mouse

Amy Dixon, Author

Sam Denlinger, Illustrator

Sky Pony Press, Fiction, 2012

Suitable for Ages: 4 and up

Themes:  Pursue your dreams, New York City Marathon, Mice, Running, Determination

Opening“Every New York City mouse dreamed of living under the bridge between Brooklyn and Staten Island.  They didn’t have to dodge taxicabs or escape hungry sewer cats…But there was one day each year that their life under the bridge was not so dreamy…Marathon day!”

Synopsis:  Most of the New York City mice thought Marathon Day was the worst day of the year because they had to be careful they wouldn’t get stepped on.  Everyone except Preston, who dreamed of running the big marathon.   Preston wanted to be extraordinary.  His papa told him that “mice scamper, not run.”  So he started training for the marathon in secret.  When the day arrived he got up early and lined up with all the big sneakers.  The starting gun sounded and he began to run and run and run!  As he reached the last few miles he started to stumble and his body ached.  But an unexpected surprise awaited him at the end.

Why I like this book:  Amy Dixon wrote a charming book that carries a big message for children – pursue your dreams.  The story is fun, inspiring and engaging.  Children will cheer Preston to the finish line.  Sam Denlinger’s illustrations are colorful and lively.  I love how the cover shows such confidence in Preston’s face.  My favorite illustration is Preston at the starting line looking at a sea of over-sized sneakers and hoping he doesn’t get squashed.  This is a very clever idea for a book!  I don’t believe I’ve seen a picture book about a marathon!  Kudos to the author for creating a fun read for children.   And, this is a great book for parents to use to encourage their young ones to run and exercise.  Teacher’s can check out a discussion guide here.  Visit Amy Dixon’s website for more information.