Woolfred Cannot Eat Dandelions

Woolfred Dandelions9781433816727_p0_v1_s260x420Woolfred Cannot Eat Dandelions: A Tale of Being True to Your Tummy

Claudine Crangle, Author and Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Sep. 28, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-7

Themes: Animals, Sheep, Food Intolerance

Opening:  “Most sheep will eat almost anything they come across… whether it’s good for them or not.” 

Synopsis: Woolfred is born with a delicate system. He can’t eat dandelions. It isn’t fair – the other sheep can eat whatever they want. Beautiful yellow clumps of dandelions grow everywhere and tempt him as he grazes. Finally he chews a mouthful of dandelions. They are so delicious until …Gaaaaglewaaaglelewush!

Why I like this book:

  • Claudine Crangle has written an engaging story about a daring young sheep who knows he can’t eat dandelions, but wants to taste them in the worst way.  Sound familiar?
  • This is one of a few picture books I’ve seen for children who have a food intolerance to products like milk, gluten, eggs, fructose and yeast. This is not a book about food allergies that may be life threatening. It is a book about learning to cope with a food intolerance and still lead a normal and active life.
  • The plot is humorous. Does Woolfred learn his lesson after he tries the dandelions the first time? No! He tries eating the different parts of the dandelion and has the same tummy reaction each time. The narrative is funny and the text is simple and silly.
  • Children with food intolerance issues will certainly identify with Woolfred. Like Woolfred, they want to eat the same foods their friends eat at school, birthday parties and outings. Like Woolfred, they don’t want to feel deprived, different or lonely.
  • I love Crangle’s takeaway message for children. While Woolfred focuses on what’s missing, he’s not seeing the good things in his life.
  • Crangle’s illustrations are in bright and colorful spring colors. They are expressive, warm and endearing. Crangle’s process is quite unusual. She begins with “an idea cut out of paper with a knife. Designs are translated through the printmaking process and evolve with each proof.  They are done by hand without any computer manipulation.”

Resources: The book is a resource for parents, caregivers and children. Children with a food intolerance will have fun discussing Woolfred’s antics and comparing them to their own situation. At the end of the story Woolfred begins to think about the other sheep and shares how his friends have differences: Dank rolls in bad smells. Lana sneezes when she’s near clover. Marino is terrified of bees. Bert likes to scratch his bottom on the ground. This would be a fun family activity to discuss how everyone is different.  Visit Claudine Crangle at her website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

My Love for You is the Sun

My Love for you9780989668835_p0_v1_s260x420My Love for You is the Sun

Julie Hedlund, Author

Susan Eaddy, Illustrator

Little Bahalia Publishing, Fiction, Sep. 9, 2014

Suitable for ages: 0-6

Themes: Parental love, Animals, Rhyming

Opening: “My love for you is the sun. / Rising in your tender heart, / It shines on you when we’re apart.”  “My love for you is a tree. / Giving shelter, strength and shade, / It comforts you when you’re afraid.”

Little Bahalia Overview: My Love for You is the Sun is a love letter from parent to child, written in verse and expressing that timeless and unconditional love through metaphors from the natural world. My Love for You is the Sun, a Tree, the Rain, a River… but of course, it’s also about more than familial or parental love, it’s about the universal, infinite nature of love itself, and as such, will hold crossover appeal for all ages.

Why I like this book: Julie Hedlund’s My Love You is the Sun, is a celebratory picture book of many types of families. It is a tender, comforting and reassuring story for young children about parental love. It is perfect for lap sharing with cherished little ones. Her text is a simple and has the authenticity of a lyrical lullaby. Her use of metaphors from the natural world adds a universal appeal to the story. It also introduces children to animals and their babies. This is a cozy and peaceful read for children at bedtime. Susan Eaddy’s richly colored hand-sculpted clay creations are a feast for any child’s eyes. Children will pour over the stunning detail on each page. The illustrations truly set this book apart. I suspect that adults will be most taken with the story and its overall treatment. This is such a beautiful collaborative effort between the author and illustrator.

Julie Hedlund is the author of A Troop is Group of Monkeys and A Shiver of Sharks. As a child she loved playing outside with animals. Visit Julie at her website, which is an incredible resource for writers and her blog posts and resources have helped many an aspiring kidlit writer reach their goals. She is the founder of 12 x 12, a forum for authors to kick-start their manuscript writing over the course of 12 months.

Susan Eaddy works entirely in polymer and modeling clay, and has appropriated every kitchen tool in the house for her art. Her clay things appear in magazines, books, greeting cards, wallpaper, kitchen textiles and other licensed products.

Jealous

Jealous9781632310071_p0_v2_s260x420Jealous

Esther Adler, Author

Shrutkirti Kaushal, Illustrator

Westlake Gavin Publishers, Nonfiction, Oct. 19, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 3-7

Themes: Helping children cope with jealousy

Opening: “When I feel jealous, my mouth tastes sour like a green pickle. When I am jealous, I can’t stop thinking I want it to.”

Book Jacket Synopsis: In this book, children will learn how to identify the physical sensations of feeling jealous, explore typical situations where they might be prone to feeling jealous, and develop coping skills to manage their jealousy more effectively.

Why I like this book:

  • It is a clever book that is written in a simple and straightforward manner.
  • The book associates a specific color and animal character with a feeling. Children will easily identify with this concept!
  • It is a go-to book for parents and educators to use when they see a child is acting out and is not able to handle a feeling.
  • The book helps kids build a healthy awareness of their feelings and learn coping mechanisms.
  • The illustrations are simple, bold and colorful, and support the book theme.
  • It is also a great classroom discussion book.

Resources: There are “interactive exercises woven throughout the book” and a series of worksheets at the end where the kids can draw a picture of what they look like when are jealous; make a list of what makes them feel jealous; write a short story about a time when they felt jealous; and draw a picture  about a time when they felt jealous. The worksheets from the books can be printed and used for free at http://www.BrightAwareness.com/print.

Note: Jealous is the fourth book in the ColorFeeling series that help children identify the physical sensations of feelings.  The other books include Angry, Sad and Happy. See book covers below.

Esther Adler, LMHC, received her undergraduate degree in Psychology and graduate degree in Mental Health Counseling from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. She counsels children of all ages in schools and privately. In her work within the field, Esther saw the need for the ColorFeeling series to help children develop a healthy awareness of their feelings. She is the mother of six children.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

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You and Me – Susan Verde and Peter H. Reynolds

You and Me9781419711978_p0_v1_s260x420You and Me

Susan Verde, Author

Peter H. Reynolds, Illustrator

Abrams Books for Young Readers, Fiction, Jan. 6, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Themes: Best Friends, Cats, Friendship, Fate, Rhyme

Opening: “Sometimes I think of how things came to be. / How we met. / How we became best friends. / You and me.”

Publisher’s SynopsisYou and Me is a loving tribute to how fate brought two best friends together. An adorable cat muses about the what-ifs in life: What if he had slept late that one special morning? What if he’d missed his train on that fateful day? Then he might never have met his favorite person in the world, and his entire life would be different!

Why I like this book: Susan Verde has written a charming tale about a serendipitous meeting between two cats at a train station– one yellow and the other purple. It is a heartwarming story about a friendship.

  • You and Me introduces children to the curious concept of life encounters that are due to chance meetings, perfect timing, fate or serendipity. The theme may seem a little big for children, but it is a concept they will quickly grasp, question and have great fun discussing.
  • Children will be amused with the yellow cat’s “what if’s.” “What if I had slept in, cover pulled up to my chin?…If I had sung opera in the shower…Or if the clock had been slow and I was late, lingering over my breakfast plate…”  Would they have ever become friends forever?
  • Verde’s narrative text is lyrical, sweet and simple for children. Adults will enjoy reading this lighthearted tale to children and reminiscing over serendipitous moments and magical encounters in their own lives.
  • Peter H. Reynolds’ illustrations are lively, whimsical and add a joyful spirit to the special friendship between the two cats.  His colorful illustrations are rendered in pen and ink, watercolor, and are playful and expressive. Great collaboration between Reynolds and Verde.
  • Visit Verde and Reynolds at their websites.

Resources: Who doesn’t like to think about fate, destiny, chance meetings, fate and serendipity. Big words for kids, but easily understood and fun to play with.  This story will trigger interesting conversations with children about the role of perfect timing plays out in their own lives. Ask them how they met some of their friends. Was it unplanned or unexpected? Was it a surprise? Did it lead to a friendship? This would make for a fun family or classroom discussion.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Rain Reign – Middle Grade

Rain Reign9780312643003_p0_v2_s260x420Rain Reign

Ann M. Martin, Author

Feiwel and Friends, Fiction, Oct. 7, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 9-12

Winner: 2015 Charlotte Huck Award Winner and the 2015 Schneider Family Book Award

Themes: Animals, Autism Spectrum, Homonyms, Separation, Friendship, Family Relationships, Bravery, Hope

Pages: 223

Opening: “I am Rose Howard and my first name has a homonym. To be accurate, it has a homophone, which is a word that’s pronounced the same as another word but spelled differently My homophone names is Rows.

Book Jacket Synopsis: Rose Howard is obsessed with homonyms. She’s thrilled that her own name is a homonym, and she purposely gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms (Reign, Rein) which, according to Rose’s rules of homonyms, is very special. Not everyone understands Rose’s obsessions, her rules, or the other things that make her different–not her teachers, not other kids, and not her single father. When a storm hits their rural town, rivers overflow, roads are flooded, and Rain goes missing. Rose’s father should not have let Rain out. Now Rose has to find her dog, even if it means leaving her routines and safe places to search.

Why I like this book: Rain Reign is told from Rose’s point of view. Superb storytelling by Ann Martin who helps her readers experience Rose’s high-functioning mind as she navigates her autistic world. This is not a story about disability, or autism, but a story about a fifth grader who uses her unique abilities and strengths to break some of her rules and routines to search for her lost dog, Rain. Martin’s narrative is seamless and gripping.  Her characters are believable with strong personalities, characteristics and quirks. The story is as captivating and creative as it is heartbreaking. It is set in a small rural town that is ravaged by a hurricane. The plot is well-paced with just the right amount of tension to keep readers intrigued, engaged and guessing. This is a realistic story that is emotionally honest and filled with heart.

Ann M. Martin is the author of Ten Rules for Living with My Sister, Ten Good and Bad Things About My Life, and Everything for a Dog, all from Feiwel and Friends. She won a Newbery Honor Award for A Corner of the Universe, and is the author of the beloved Baby-sitters Club series.

Simon and the Bear: A Hanukkah Tale

Simon and the Bear9781423143550_p0_v2_s260x420Simon and the Bear: A Hanukkah Tale

Eric A. Kimmel, Author

Matthew Trueman, Illustrator

Disney Hyperion Books, Fiction, Sept. 2, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 3-7

Pages: 40

Themes: Miracles, Survival,  Shipwreck, Hanukkah, Jews, Polar Bear, Faith, Courage

Opening: “When Simon set out for America, he promised his mother and brothers and sisters that he would work hard and save money. As soon as he could, he would send tickets for all of them. Simon’s mother lovingly packed his knapsack for the journey…Because Hanukkah was coming, she added something extra.”

Book Synopsis: When Simon leaves his home in the old country, his mother reminds him to celebrate Hanukkah during his sea voyage: “Who knows? You may need a miracle on your long journey.” Turns out Simon does need a miracle. When the ship strikes an iceberg Simon is offered the last seat on a lifeboat, but selflessly offers it to a gentleman who has a son. As the ship sinks, Simon leaps onto the iceberg. Knowing he needs a miracle, he pulls out his menorah and lights the Shamash. A polar bear appears from the icy water. Simon shares some of his latkes and eggs with the bear. In turn the bear curls up and sleeps next to Simon, keeping him warm. Days pass, Simon runs out of food and has one last candle to light. Will Simon run out of miracles?

Why I like this book:  There are never too many altruistic books for children during the holiday season and this one is perfect for Hanukkah. Eric A. Kimmel has written a heartwarming story for children that encourages faith and a belief in miracles, which is what Hanukkah is about. The story mirrors the ill-fated voyage of the Titanic. The plot is strong with just the right amount of tension to keep you turning the pages. Kimmel’s tale is filled with details of foods and traditions related to Hanukkah. Simon is a child filled with heart, faith and courage.  Matthew Trueman’s illustrations are evocative and add considerably to the sacred mood of the story. His stunning double-page spreads of black and deep blues are contrasted with images of light in the darkness, symbolically suggesting miracles are possible. Beautiful collaborative work between author and illustrator.

Resources: An Author’s Note on the history of Hanukkah is included at the end.  Jewish communities in the United States celebrate Hanukkah from Dec. 17-24. Visit the Lookstein Center for activities, poetry, games and projects.

Dash

Dash9780545416351_p0_v1_s260x420Dash

Kirby Larson, Author

Scholastic Press, Fiction, Aug, 26, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes: Japanese-American Children, Evacuation, Relocation, Concentration Camps,  Dogs, WW II

Synopsis: After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Mitsi Kashino is separated from her home, friends, schoolmates, community and her beloved dog, Dash. There is a lot of fear in America. Because Mitsi is of American-Japanese descent, she and her family are forced to pack their suitcases and are evacuated from their home.  They are relocated to two different concentration camps that are overcrowded, unhealthy, and surrounded by tall fences. Mitsi is forced to leave her dog, Dash, with Mrs. Bowker, an older neighbor who cares for him. Mrs. Bowker sends Mitsi weekly letters from Dash. Mitsi’s strong family ties and her letters from Dash give her hope that one day she will be reunited with her pet.

Why I like this book: Kirby Larson has created a strong heart-felt connection for her readers with Mitsi’s attachment to Dash. Dash adds an authentic touch to this deeply emotional story about a dark period in America’s history. Larson shows Mitsi going to school, playing with her two best friends until the attack occurs on Pearl Harbor occurs. Mitsi feels the prejudice from her best friends who begin to bully her with facial expressions, racial slurs and nasty notes. Larson’s characters are well-developed. Mitsi’s voice remains determined  and strong even when she’s struggling and balancing so many issues. She finds solace in her artwork and writing.  Larson’s depiction of life at the internment camps is very realistic with over-crowded living conditions, long lines, heat, dirt, fleas, smelly latrines,  and minimal food (oatmeal and Vienna Sausages). The plot is engaging, heartbreaking, and packed with adventure. Larson’s powerful story is based on the true story of Mitsue “Mitsi” Shiraishi, who loved her dog, Chubby and left him behind with a neighbor, who wrote the real “Mitsi” letters from Chubby. I highly recommend this important story about the resilience of the human spirit.

Kirby Larson is the acclaimed author of the 2007 Newbury Honor book Hattie Big Sky; its sequel, Hattie Ever After; The Friendship Doll; Dear America: The Fences Between Us; and Duke.  Visit Kirby Larson at her website.