Healing Days: A Guide for Kids Who Have Experienced Trauma

Healing Days9781433812934_p0_v1_s260x420Healing Days: A Guide for Kids Who Have Experienced Trauma

Susan Farber Straus, Ph.D., Author

Maria Bogade, Illustrator

Magination Press., Fiction, May 18, 2013

Suitable for Ages: 5 -11

Themes: Children facing trauma and tragedy, PTSD, Anxiety, Fear, Anger, Healing

Opening“Something bad happened to me.  I did not want anyone to know.  I was scared.  I was sad.  I was angry.  I was embarrassed.  I was hurt and confused.  I tried to forget.  I tried to sleep and not wake up.” 

Synopsis:  A child has had something scary happen.  We follow the child through feelings of hurt, confusion, anger and fear that the bad thing might happen again.  The child has bad dreams and is afraid of the dark.  At school there are run-ins with the teachers.  Friends notice the child isn’t fun to play with.  The child is lonely.  Finally an aunt notices differences and takes the child to talk with a therapist who helps the child share the secret.  Only then can intervention and healing begin for the child.

Why I like this book:  I am thrilled to find Susan Farber Straus’ very sensitive and comforting book due to its relevance in our world today.   Although the story is told from the viewpoint of one child, each page features pictures of a diverse group of children of all ages acting out the narrative.  This book is a fabulous tool for parents, guidance counselors and therapists to read with a child when they may suspect a trauma.  And that trauma could range from abuse, an accident, school and home violence, bullying, the sudden death of a parent or sibling to natural disasters like tornadoes, hurricanes and floods that are prevalent today in the world.  The book also helps children know they aren’t alone and that they can find ways to heal.  Maria Bogade’s illustrations are warm, and comforting, and beautifully show the emotion of the children.

Resources:  The book alone is a resource as the author is a clinical psychologist.  The American Psychological Association also has a list of helpful resources available online.  Also be sure to read the Note to Readers at the beginning of the book and check out the jacket flaps on the front and back pages.

Note:  I will be attending the Northern Ohio SCBWI conference this weekend, so I won’t be able to respond to your comments or posts until I return.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Love, Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom

LoveLizzie51oEU3AbzRL__SX285_Love, Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom

Lisa Tucker McElroy, Author

Diane Paterson, Illustrator

Albert Whitman & Company, Fiction, 2009

Suitable for Ages: 6-10

Themes: Military Families, Mothers and Daughters, Separation, War

Opening: “Dear Mommy,  I know that it’s only been three days since you went away, but I really, really miss you.  Can you come back soon?”

Summary:  Lizzie’s mother is a soldier who has been deployed overseas to serve her country, and Lizzie misses her a lot.   She and her mother write a lot of letters to help with their separation.  Lizzie keeps her up to date with every day happenings at home with her Daddy and brother.  She talks about school, winning a soccer game and attending the state finals.  Lizzie draws pictures of how she rearranges her room.  She also draws many detailed maps about changes in town, and trips she takes with her Dad and brother to visit grandparents.  Foremost in Lizzie’s mind are the questions “Are you staying safe, Mommy?” and “When will you be home?”

What I like about this book:  This book is a series of hand-written letters with child-like drawings.  The major focus is about how a child deals with a long separation from a parent, especially if the parent is on a dangerous assignment.   Lisa Tucker McElroy has written a compelling book that speaks for the many military children who silently serve at home and endure the long separations, anxiety, fear and concern for the safety of their deployed parent.  They want to know where their parents are, what they are doing, why they miss birthday parties, holidays and soccer tournaments.  Diane Paterson’s colorful and lively artwork is very appealing.

Resources:  The author has written “Tips from Lizzie and Her Mom on Handling Separation.”   A great activity is to encourage your child to create a memory box where they can save things they’ve done throughout the year.  The box can be a way of sharing their year with a returning parent.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Little Daisy’s Worst/Best Day

Daisy Worst Best Day20f252b73c66e1ed19c11e6846035df8_k1jc_aqq4Little Daisy’s Worst/Best Day

Kathleen Edick and Paula Johnson, Authors

Wee the People Publishing, LLC, 2012

Suitable for ages: 3 and up

Themes:  Moving, Leaving Family, Friends and Pets, Starting New Schools, Making New Friends

Opening “We’re at Grandma and Grandpa’s house today.  Mommy’s home packing; We’re moving away.  This is the Worst Day I’ve ever had.  I don’t want to move?  It’s making me sad.” 

Synopsis:  A sister and brother are moving far away and leaving behind their dog, Daisy, who they’ve had since she was a puppy.  One day an older couple comes to take Daisy home with them to their big farm.  It is Daisy’s WORST DAY ever.  She won’t eat, play, and ignores her new family.  Then one day the new owner feeds her a bowl of spaghetti.  And the farmer takes Daisy for a ride through the fields in the back of his truck.  Daisy discovers a whole new world of digging, exploring and chasing rodents.  At the same time the children learn similar lessons and make new friends.  And they keep in touch with their grandparents by writing letters until they are reunited during vacation.

Why I like this book:  This charming book is part of the “We Serve Too!” series written in verse for military children by two loving grandmothers, Kathleen Edick and Paula Johnson.  The characters remain the same in all four books.  Relocation and moving is a theme shared by both military and civilian children.  And this is a true story about the author’s real-life “Daisy Dog,” who comes to live on their farm when a family moves.  The authors are very clever to use Daisy to help children express their feelings about moving.  This beautiful story will help ease the fear and anxiety of moving.  It offers hope that things will work out.  The illustrations are colorful and show a lot of love and emotion.   Visit the Wee Serve Too! website.

And, I want to give a shout-out for the other three Wee Serve Too! books I’ve reviewed:  A Child’s Deployment Book, A Child’s Reunion Book, and The Homecoming Box.  These are quality books that have helped many military children through tough times.  I have donated all the of my books to my local library.  They were thrilled to receive them and ordered another set for the other branch.

Resources:  The authors have a free discussion guide that can be downloaded free from their website.  Just click on Little Daisy’s Worst/Best Day to get access to the guide.  This book  is a great tool for discussing a move with any child.

This book has been provided to me free of charge by the author/publisher in exchange for an honest review of the work.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Sun Kisses, Moon Hugs

Sun Kisses, Moon Hugspdf_coverLRSun Kisses, Moon Hugs

Susan Bernardo, Author

Courtenay Fletcher, Illustrator

Inner Flower Child Books, Fiction, Nov. 15, 2012

Suitable for:  Ages 4 and up

Themes:  Separation, Anxiety, Grief, Divorce, Inspirational, Reassurance

Opening/Synopsis:  “No matter how far apart we are, I’ll always find ways to tell you I love you./ How?/ From wherever we stand, you see the moon and I see the moon.  That is how we can send each other hugs./ Moon hugs?/  Yes, moon hugs.”  This story is told through the seasons and delivers a very powerful message to children — love is eternal.   

Why I like this bookSun Kisses, Moon Hugs is pure poetry and a visual feast for the eyes.   Written and illustrated by two friends,  Susan and Courtenay have taken a sad subject about separation and created a beautiful consoling book for children.  It is written in dialogue, but is very lyrical and inspirational.  It is the perfect book to use with children when they are dealing with separation from a parent because of deployment or job, loss, illness, divorce,  and tragedy.   The dialogue in the book gives kids the vocabulary to feel connected and to feel the presence of a loved one — and it’s all done through signs of nature. The illustrations are big, vibrant and breathtaking, and include children from all cultures.  The book is simply beautiful!

Sun KissesIllust_2lr

Favorite rhymes:

“But the moon doesn’t have any arms!/It’s true the moon cannot reach down to hold your hand, but she is strong enough to pull waves onto sand./Her invisible arms rock the tides by night and day, like my love holds you safely when I am away.”

“But when I wake up, the moon will be gone!/ Ahh, but then we can send each other kisses by dawn.  When you open your eyes and see the sun rise, just do this…blow a kiss.”

“From the heavens above to earth below, there are infinite ways to say hello.  Love is in each star twinkling in space and every frosty snowflake tickling your face.”

Resources:  The book alone is a beautiful resource.   Children will be wide-eyed with questions as you snuggle with them to read Sun Kisses, Moon Hugs.   You may visit the author’s website for more information.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

This book has been provided to me free of charge by the author/publisher in exchange for an honest review of the work. 

Mr. Worry – A Story About OCD; OCD Awareness Week Oct. 10-16, 2011

Mr. Worry - A Story about OCD,  is written by Holly L. Niner, illustrated by Greg Swearingen and published by Albert Whitman & Company for children from Kindergarten to fourth grade.   Niner has written a sensitive and meaningful story about a boy with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).   She has a wonderful grasp of OCD,  as she has a child with the disorder and realizes the importance of seeking early intervention.   Swearingen’s illustrations are rich, soft and perfectly capture the emotion of the story.  I highly  recommend this book for kids with OCD, parents, school counselors and teachers.

Before Kevin goes to sleep every night, he checks his closet to make sure nothing is there, looks under his bed repeatedly to make sure it is safe, pushes his chair against his desk, straightens the books on his desk and lines up the cars on his shelf.  And, he asks his mother the same questions repeatedly.   Kevin worries about everything at home and school.  Once the worry starts he has a hard time stopping because “his mind gets sweaty.”   Kevin’s parents are supportive and take him to talk with a therapist, who helps Kevin understand that he has OCD like many other children and adults.   Kevin is relieved to know that he’s not alone or crazy.  He decides to call his OCD, Mr. Worry.  He pictures Mr. Worry as a little man who keeps track of all of Kevin’s worries.  Kevin’s goal is to begin to hang up the phone on Mr. Worry when he calls.   Through behavioral therapy and medications Kevin begins to manage his OCD.   This book is such an accurate portrayal of OCD, children and families will find comfort in its message.  I also believe that this book could be helpful for any child dealing with excessive fear and anxiety.

Mr.Worry was selected by International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) as the Outstanding Book for Young People with Disabilities in 2005.   Holly Niner also is the author of I Can’t Stop: A Story about Tourette Syndrome

OCD Awareness Week is Oct. 10-16, 2011, and sponsored by the International OCD Foundation .   According to the foundation at least 1 in 200 children and teens in the U.S. have OCD.   Understanding the stress and impact OCD has on their lives is imperative in helping them seek the right treatment.   OCD is an all-consuming, debilitating disorder that affects up to 4 million people in the United States.  The disorder also affects millions more: family, friends and caregivers of those with OCD suffer along
side their loved ones.  Please visit the organization website as it has a wealth of information for children, teens, adults, families and school counselors.  Another interesting website for kids with OCD or anxiety is WorryWiseKids.

Copyright (c) 2011,  Patricia Howe Tilton, All Rights Reserved