Peace, Bugs, and Understanding

Peace, Bugs9781937006631_p0_v3_s260x420Peace, Bugs, and Understanding: An Adventure in Sibling Harmony

Gail Silver, Author

Youme Nguyen Ly, Illustrator

Parallax Press, Fiction, Dec. 9, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Anger, Sibling Rivalry, Mindfulness

Opening: Lily was having a picnic with her father and her little sister, Ruby, but it wasn’t much fun. Ruby was lying on the checkerboard.

Book Jacket Synopsis: Lily and her sister are having a picnic when Ruby spoils their game of checkers. Lily lashes out but soon gets absorbed in a wonderful book, the story of her great-grandfather Lahn’s encounter with a strong-looking frog-like creature called Anger. The precious old journal teaches Lily about Metta, a technique that has helped people transform anger into loving kindness for thousands of years.

Why I like this book:

  • Gail Silver, author of Ahn’s Anger, has written a positive and resourceful book for children and adults about transforming negative feelings. This book focuses on anger, but I believe it can be used with feelings of jealousy, frustration, anxiety, disappointment or any negative feeling that causes disharmony. It’s a book children and parents will want to read together.
  • Peace, Bugs and Understanding, introduces its readers to a very simple calming technique called “Metta,” which means loving kindness. Silver suggests “that when you practice Metta,  sit quietly and become aware of your own breath.” Once you calm yourself, you focus on the person you are angry with and wish for them “to be happy, be strong, be safe and live with peace.” 
  • This is a wonderful tool for children and adults to cultivate forgiveness towards others and even themselves. How can you be angry at someone when you are sending them kind, happy and loving thoughts?
  • The book is a story within a story. Therefore, Youme Nguyen Ly’s illustrations are colorful and warm watercolors in Lily’s world, but are gray and white pen and ink for Lahn’s journal.  The illustrations project a sense of calm that fits beautifully with the theme. This is a lovely collaboration between author and illustrator.

Resources: My favorite part of the book is a “Reader’s Guide” at the end that helps parents teach “Metta” to their children. There is also a page of discussion questions to use with children. This is also a book to pair with Ahn’s Anger, which I reviewed in 2013. You can visit Gail Silver and Youme Nguyen Ly at their websites.

Gail Silver is the founder of Yoga Child, a program that develops curriculum for school-based yoga and mindfulness programs. She is the author of Anh’s Anger and its sequel Steps and Stones.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Angel Violet’s Magic Wings

Angel Violets Magic WingsuntitledAngel Violet’s Magic Wings

Bonnie Snyder, Ed.S., CPC, Author

Alissa Shoults, Illustrator

Bonnie Snyder, Publisher, Nonfiction, 2013

Suitable for ages: 3-7

Themes: Feelings, Empowerment, Happy hearts, Managing challenges, Inspirational

Opening: “Once upon a time all the children on the earth everywhere remembered something that many grown-ups forgot: Everyone has a happy heart and everyone sparkles from the inside out.”

Synopsis: A delightful book that helps children focus on their happy and yucky feelings, and identify where the feeling is located in their body –heart, tummy, head or back. The author shows children and parents healthy ways to bond through conversation, mindfulness, and exercises that include visualization and gratitude.

Why I like this book:

  • Bonnie Snyder has written a soothing and empowering book to help children talk about their feelings. There is a lovely story on the right side of each double-page spread that helps children easily identify a positive and happy feeling, or a sad and angry feeling.
  • On the left side of the page are questions and suggestions for  parents to help them start a conversation with their child about their day.  For example: What felt happy in your heart today? (younger child) What were three happy things in your day today? (older) What are the three most favorite things about your day today? (older)
  • Angel Violet’s Magic Wings is a lovely resource for parents, grandparents and caregivers.  It is a book filled with exercises and visualization techniques that can be taught to children, who will hopefully feel the benefits.
  • It also helps children cultivate a feeling of gratitude and thankfulness.
  • Alisa Shoults illustrations are in soothing colors of blue, violet, pink and green.  They are childlike and whimsical and fit the tone of the book.

Resources: The book is a resource with many tips, activities, visualizations and exercises to use with a child. Adults will also benefit from reading the book.  Check out the website for Angel Violet’s Magic Wings. 

Malala – Iqbal, by Jeanette Winter

malala-a-brave-girl-from-pakistan-iqbal-a-brave-9781481422949_lgMalala: A Brave Girl From Pakistan

Iqbal: A Brave Boy from Pakistan

Jeanette Winter, Author and illustrator

Beech Lane Books, Biography, Nov. 4, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Children speaking out about injustice, Bravery, Malala, Iqbal, Pakistan, Taliban

Openings: Two children from Pakistan spoke out against injustice in their world. Their bravery in the face of great danger is an inspiration to all who know their stories.

“Who is Malala?” the Taliban demands, looking into the school van. 

“Twelve dollars!  Until the twelve-dollar loan to his parents is repaid, four-year-old Iqbal must work in the carpet factory. Twelve dollars for a boy’s freedom.”

Beech Lane Books Synopsis:  Meet two heroes of Pakistan who stood up for the rights to freedom and education in these inspirational nonfiction tales from acclaimed author-illustrator Jeanette Winter. Two stories of bravery in one beautiful book—including the story of Malala Yousafzai, a winner of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize!

One country: Pakistan. Two children: Iqbal Masih and Malala Yousafzai. Each was unafraid to speak out. He, against inhumane child slavery in the carpet trade. She, for the right of girls to attend school. Both were shot by those who disagreed with them—he in 1995, she in 2012. Iqbal was killed instantly; Malala miraculously survived and continues to speak out around the world.

Why I like this book:

  • It is an illustrated picture book biography.
  • Great pairing of two very brave children in one book.  Read Malala’s Yousafzai’s story first and then flip the book over and read Iqbal Masih’s  story.
  • The text is very simple and childlike; the words powerful. This is an inspiring book that will introduce children to the courageous boy and girl who share a common interest–they want to attend school at a high cost to their lives.
  • The colorful digital illustrations capture the story in a manner that won’t frighten children. Mid-way through the book where the stories meet, an illustration depicts Malala and Iqbal flying kites on a double-page spread. Malala is holding onto to the string of her kite, while Iqbal (a shadow of a boy) lets go of his string. This page is symbolic of their intertwined lives and a kind of passing of the torch to Malala who refuses to be silenced by bullets and becomes the voice for human rights.
  • This is an excellent introductory book to use in the classroom.

Resources: There is an author’s note at the beginning of each story that highlights each child with more detail. This belongs in every school library. It is a great way to discuss the plight of children living in other countries. How are their lives similar and different? Encourage students to write a letter to Malala.

Jeanette Winter is the acclaimed author/illustrator of many highly regarded picture books, including The Librarian of Basra: A True Story from Iraq; Mama: A True Story in Which a Baby Hippo Loses His Mama During a Tsunami, but Finds a New Home and a New Mama; Wangari’s Trees of Peace: A True Story from Africa; Nasreen’s Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan; Biblioburro: A True Story from Colombia; Henri’s Scissors, and Mr. Cornell’s Dream Boxes. 

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Positive

Positive9780062342515_p0_v4_s260x420Positive

Paige Rawl with Ali Benjamin, Authors

Harper Collins, Memoir, Aug. 26, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 12-16

Themes: Paige Rawl, HIV-positive children, AIDS in adolescence, Bullying, Suicide, Hope

Book Synopsis: Cheerleader, soccer player, honor roll student. One of the good kids at her middle school. Then on an unremarkable day, Paige disclosed the one thing that made her “different”: her HIV-positive status. Within hours, the bullying began.  They called her PAIDS. Left cruel notes on her locker. Talked in whispers about her and mocked her openly. She turned to school administrators for help. Instead of assisting her, they ignored her urgent pleas…and told her to stop the drama. She had never felt more alone. One night, desperate for escape, Paige found herself in front of the medicine cabinet, staring at a bottle of sleeping pills. That could have been the end of her story. Instead, it was only the beginning.

Why I like this book: Paige Rawl and Ali Benjamin have written a realistic, raw, brave and powerful memoir about a teen living with HIV since birth. Although Paige is stable on medications, HIV is such a sensitive subject and tough diagnosis for a teen to deal with — especially when her best friend betrays her. Once Paige’s secret spreads like wildfire at school, the bullying begins. This is one of the best memoirs I’ve read this year. It is a real page turner that I could not put down. Although what happens to Paige is heartbreaking, her courage to reclaim herself and move forward is inspiring. You will find yourself rooting for Paige as she finds a voice she didn’t know she had. Her memoir is written in short chapters and is well-paced. Her voice is strong and determined. In sharing her story, she encourages other teens to find their inner strength in the midst of any storm. And her experience has made a difference for others.

Resources: There is extensive information and facts about HIV, bullying and suicide.  She shares information on programs for kids who are touched by HIV/AIDS, a National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and programs to stop bullying.

The Night Before The Night Before Christmas – Book Giveaway

The Night Before Christmas9780989810821_p0_v1_s260x420The Night Before The Night Before Christmas

Jay Dee, Author

Darren Geers, Illustrators

Kraine Kreative, Fiction, Nov. 3, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 3 and up

Themes: Santa, Elves, Workshop, Christmas

Opening: “At the North Pole — buried deep in glistening, powdery white snow– lies the cabin of Santa Claus. Outside, not a sound could be heard…But inside, on this night –the night before the night before Christmas — Santa’s cabin was anything but quiet.”

Book Synopsis: At Santa’s workshop, the night before the night before Christmas is hardly a time to rest. The elves work tirelessly to get the final toys made before Christmas Eve, but Elfie just can’t keep pace. He spends too much time making his toys perfect, and when Santa comes to check on production, all the elves are surprised by his reaction.

ElfieTNBTNBC_4_5

Illustrations Courtesy of Darren Geers

Why I like this book: Children worldwide know about the night before Christmas, but have they ever wondered about the night before that night at the North Pole? Jay Dee has written a heartwarming Christmas story about Elfie who makes sure that his toys are flawless and that gets him in trouble with the head elf, Nathan. Elfie is behind the other elves and shutters when he hears Santa is on his way to inspect the progress in the workshop. I like the book’s theme about doing your best no matter how others feel.  Giving your best is all the counts. The story is very creative reminder about the true meaning of Christmas and the holiday season.  Darren Geers illustrations are eye-popping, expressive and gorgeous — just look at the expression on Elfie’s face on the cover. Geers sketches his illustrations with ink and digitally colors them.  They really make this book a standout for children. Visit Jay Dee at his website.ElfiePage8_9_revision1

Resources/Activities:  After reading the book, provide your kids with paper, crayons, scissors, glitter and glue and encourage them to draw a favorite Christmas scene related to the book or to the true story of Christmas. Make an elf mobile. Have children make a Christmas list, but a list that they would give to a special child in need.  Drop off a toy to “Toys for Tots” or look at programs your church may sponsor to help the less fortunate.

Book Giveaway:  Participants must be U.S. residents. All you need to do is leave a comment and indicate that you are interested in receiving a copy.  A winner will be selected randomly. Comment by 11:59 EST December 4.  I will announce the winner on my blog December 7.  Please make sure I know how to get in touch with you (via Blog, FB, E-mail, Twitter) if you are selected.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

A Time fo Dance

A Time to Dance9780399257100_p0_v2_s260x420A time to Dance

Padma Venkatraman, Author

Nancy Paulsen Books, Fiction, May 2014

Suitable for ages: 12-16

Themes: Dance, India, Amputee, Disabilities, Abilities

Book Jacket Synopsis: Veda, a classical dance prodigy in India, lives and breathes dance–so when an accident leaves her a below-knee amputee, her dreams are shattered. For a girl who’s grown up used to receiving applause for her dance prowess and flexibility, adjusting to a prosthetic leg is painful and humbling. But Veda refuses to let her disability rob her of her dreams, and she starts all over again, taking beginner classes with the youngest dancers. Then Veda meets Govinda, a young man who approaches dance as a spiritual pursuit. As their relationship deepens, Veda reconnects with the world around her, and begins to discover who she is and what dance truly means to her.

Why I like this book: This inspirational novel is lyrically written in verse. Padma Venkatraman has woven together a story about loss and resilience of a girl determined to dance once again her beloved Bharatanatyam.  This is not a story about disability, but one of ability. It is about finding the deeper spiritual meaning of the dance over the applause. “For my invisible audience of the One I begin to dance./ Colors blur into whiteness and a lilting tune that is and is not of the world resonates within and without me./ My body feels whole./In the beat of my heart I hear again the eternal rhythm of Shiva’s feet.” Reading Venkatraman’s novel is an experience of India in all its beauty, cultural traditions, senses and sounds. If you listen closely you can hear the faint echo of a dancing rhythm.  Thaiya thai. Thaiya thai.  I highly recommend this beautiful novel for tweens and teens who have faced challenges in their lives. This book is a treasure on my bookshelf.

Padma Venkatraman is an oceanographer by training and a writer by choice. She is the author of Climbing the Stairs and Island’s End, both multi-award winners.  Padma was born in India, but is now an American citizen. Visit Padma at her website. It has discussion questions and teaching resources.

Snowflakes Fall

Snowflakes Fall 9780385376938_p0_v2_s260x420Snowflakes Fall

Patricia MacLachlan, Author

Steven Kellogg, Illustrator

Random House Children’s Books, Fiction, 2013

Suitable for Ages: 3-7

Themes: Snowflakes,  Grief, Renewal, Memory

Opening: “After the flowers are gone/ Snowflakes fall./ Flake/After flake/After flake/Each one a pattern/ All its own–/No two the same–/All beautiful.”

Book Jacket Synopsis: In Snowflakes Fall, Newbery Medalist Patricia MacLachlan and award-winning artist Steven Kellogg, portray life’s natural cycle: its beauty, its joy, and its sorrow.  Her simple but powerful words gently convey the impact of loss and the healing power of memory.  This book is a tribute to the qualities that make each individual unique.

Why I like this book:  Patricia MacLachlan and  Steven Kellogg collaborate to create this beautiful, lyrical and inspirational book to honor and remember the community of Sandy Hook and Newtown, CT, who lost family members during the school shooting in Dec. 14, 2012.  In opening remarks, Kellogg, a former resident of the community,  says he hopes “to celebrate the laughter, the playful high spirits, and the uniqueness of the children of Sandy Hook and children everywhere.”  There is no mention in the story about the Sandy Hook incident. Instead, the book celebrates the individuality of children and compares them to snowflakes, with no two being alike.  It offers hope that when the world is dark, in the morning the “world shines” and the children will romp in the snow, build forts, go sledding, leave their footprints and make snow angels.  Kellogg’s illustrations are colorful, magical and uplifting.  Make sure you check out both the front and end pages because they add to the story.  Random House has made a donation to the Sandy Hook School Support Fund and donated 25,000 new books to the national literacy organization First Book in the community’s honor and in support of children everywhere.

Resources: Parents and teachers can use this book as a quiet book about the natural life cycles of birth and renewal.   It is an excellent book to help children work through grief and healing.  With winter quickly approaching,  it is a perfect time to encourage children to play in the snow, catch snow flakes on their tongues, follow animal tracks and make snow angels.  Visit Random House for a special list of activities, coloring pages and a teacher’s guide for Snowflakes Fall.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.