Beautiful Moon: A Child’s Prayer

Beautiful Moon9781419707926_p0_v1_s260x420Beautiful Moon: A Child’s Prayer

Tonya Bolden, Author

Eric Velasquez, Illustrator

Abrams Books for Young Readers, Fiction, Nov. 4, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Prayer, Bedtime, City and town life, Compassion, Kindness

Opening: The amber orb floats, washing the night with a radiant glow. Stars hide. Only city lights glitter. It’s not a silent night. Car horns beep and blare. There is music in the air. And someone calls out, “I love you!”

Book Jacket Synopsis: A young boy wakes. He has forgotten to say his prayers.  Outside his window, a beautiful harvest moon illuminates the city around him and its many inhabitants. As the moon slowly makes its way across the heavens, the boy offers a simple prayer for the homeless, for the hungry and for others.

What I like about this book:

  • The narrative is simple and straightforward.  It is very inspirational, comforting and heartwarming, more than it is religious.
  • There is a balance of diversity.
  • The boy’s sincerity carries a powerful message. It is important for children to see how the boy focuses his prayers on social needs of today’s world before he focuses on his family, his teacher and his pet turtle.
  • This book will help parents have discussions with their kids about who is in need and who they may want to pray for.
  • Vasquez’s rich and beautiful illustrations are painted in oil. Each double-spread shows the moon in a different phase meaningful to the setting. As the boys prays for people with no homes, the sick to be healed or for wars to end, Vasquez highlights his prayers by showing a woman bundled up on a park bench, a man in a hospital bed and a soldier in a distant land.
  • This is a wonderful collaborative effort between the author and illustrator.

Tonya Bolden has written a number of highly regarded books for both children and adults. Maritcha: A 19th Century American Girl won a Coretta Scott King Honor Award and a James Madison Book Award. Her other books include Emancipation Proclamation, M.L.K. and Searching for Sarah Rector.

Eric Velasquez is the illustrator of numerous books, including My Uncle Martin’s Big Heart and My Uncle Martin’s Words for America, both by Angela Farris Watkins. He has received much praise for his work, including the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award and the Pura Belpre Honor for illustration.

Peace, Bugs, and Understanding

Peace, Bugs9781937006631_p0_v3_s260x420Peace, Bugs, and Understanding: An Adventure in Sibling Harmony

Gail Silver, Author

Youme Nguyen Ly, Illustrator

Parallax Press, Fiction, Dec. 9, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Anger, Sibling Rivalry, Mindfulness

Opening: Lily was having a picnic with her father and her little sister, Ruby, but it wasn’t much fun. Ruby was lying on the checkerboard.

Book Jacket Synopsis: Lily and her sister are having a picnic when Ruby spoils their game of checkers. Lily lashes out but soon gets absorbed in a wonderful book, the story of her great-grandfather Lahn’s encounter with a strong-looking frog-like creature called Anger. The precious old journal teaches Lily about Metta, a technique that has helped people transform anger into loving kindness for thousands of years.

Why I like this book:

  • Gail Silver, author of Ahn’s Anger, has written a positive and resourceful book for children and adults about transforming negative feelings. This book focuses on anger, but I believe it can be used with feelings of jealousy, frustration, anxiety, disappointment or any negative feeling that causes disharmony. It’s a book children and parents will want to read together.
  • Peace, Bugs and Understanding, introduces its readers to a very simple calming technique called “Metta,” which means loving kindness. Silver suggests “that when you practice Metta,  sit quietly and become aware of your own breath.” Once you calm yourself, you focus on the person you are angry with and wish for them “to be happy, be strong, be safe and live with peace.” 
  • This is a wonderful tool for children and adults to cultivate forgiveness towards others and even themselves. How can you be angry at someone when you are sending them kind, happy and loving thoughts?
  • The book is a story within a story. Therefore, Youme Nguyen Ly’s illustrations are colorful and warm watercolors in Lily’s world, but are gray and white pen and ink for Lahn’s journal.  The illustrations project a sense of calm that fits beautifully with the theme. This is a lovely collaboration between author and illustrator.

Resources: My favorite part of the book is a “Reader’s Guide” at the end that helps parents teach “Metta” to their children. There is also a page of discussion questions to use with children. This is also a book to pair with Ahn’s Anger, which I reviewed in 2013. You can visit Gail Silver and Youme Nguyen Ly at their websites.

Gail Silver is the founder of Yoga Child, a program that develops curriculum for school-based yoga and mindfulness programs. She is the author of Anh’s Anger and its sequel Steps and Stones.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Leah’s Voice

Leah's Voice9781612442402_p0_v1_s260x420Leah’s Voice

Lori DeMonia, Author

Monique Turchan, Illustrator

Halo Publishing International, Fiction, 2013

Suitable for ages: 5-8 years

Themes: Autism Spectrum, Siblings, Differences, Compassion, Kindness, Special Needs

Opening: Logan stood at the window waiting with excitement. Her friend Abby was coming over for her very first play date. As soon as a car pulled in the drive, Logan yelled out, “She’s here!” 

Synopsis: Logan looks forward to a play date with her friend Abby. She introduces Abby to her older sister Leah. They play a board game and invite Leah to play. But Leah leaves the room after her turn. Abby is upset that Leah won’t stay and play. Logan explains that her sister is uncomfortable around new people. Abby tells Logan that “next time we’ll play at my house.” Logan is sad about how her friend treats Leah and wonders why she doesn’t like her. Logan thinks about the similarities and differences between her and Leah. Her mother takes them to a movie and Leah has a melt down and ruins the day. Logan is angry and confused. Her parents explain that Leah has autism and that’s why she doesn’t talk much and gets upset easily. Logan tries to be patient and focuses on what Leah loves best, drawing pictures.

Why I like this book: Lori DeMonia knows first hand the confusion and challenge for a sibling who has an autistic sister or brother.  It is a fictional story inspired by her daughters. The story is told with such simplicity that young children will be able to read and understand. Siblings don’t know how to explain it to their friends. They are embarrassed by their behavior and angry when they have meltdowns and ruin family outings. Leah’s Voice is an important story about accepting differences and treating others with respect and kindness. It is perfect for the classroom. Monique Turchan’s illustrations are colorful and lively. They beautifully capture the emotion of the story.

Awards:  2014 Temple Grandin Outstanding Literary Work of the Year award from the Autism Society of America, the Mom’s Choice Award, the New York Book Festival 2013 Honorable Mention Award,  and the London Book Festival 2013 Honorable Mention Award.

Resources: Visit the website for Leah’s Voice to  see Leah’s artwork and find printable pages. For information about autism visit the Austism Society website.

Words Wound: Delete Cyberbullying and Make Kindness Go Viral

WordsWound9781575424514_p0_v2_s260x420Words Wound: Delete Cyberbullying and Make Kindness Go Viral

Justin W. Patchin, Ph.D, and Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D., Authors

Free Spirit Publishing, Nonfiction, Dec. 3, 2013

Suitable for Ages: 13-17

Themes: Cyberbullying, Bullying, Computer crimes, Internet and teenagers, Prevention, Kindness

Publisher Synopsis: Cyberbullying among teens happens every day. Vicious messages and damaging photos exchanged through texts, email, and social media can lead to humiliation, broken friendships, punishment at school, and–as recent headlines prove–legal prosecution and even suicide. Faced with this pandemic problem, concerned parents, educators, and young people across the country are looking for information and advice.  Words Wound  is written especially for tweens and teens on the importance of standing up for themselves and others online.

Why I like this book: Justin W. Patchin, Ph.D., and Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D., are cyberbullying experts who have written a practical and valuable handbook for teens. Both authors know from personal experience what it feels like to be bullied at school. They have researched and talked with thousands of teens at schools, libraries and youth centers about their experiences with bullying. They’ve spoken with parents who have lost children to suicide. Words Wound is very easy to use. It is divided into three parts all supported with real-life stories and strategies for preventing, reducing and combatting cyberbulling at school. Teens are taught ways to be kind, respectful and stand up for friends. And, they are encouraged to be advocates for change in their schools and communities. What I like about this user-friendly guide is you can choose the chapters that interest you, or you can read it from beginning to end. It is a “must-have companion” for any kid with social media access. This book is a valuable resource for parents, educators and administrators. The authors wrote the book because they“know what a school without bullying looks like.” They have visited many schools across the country that are bully free because of students and educators working together.

Resources: The authors run the Cyberbullying Research Center and have designed a website, Words Wound, specifically for teens. It is a place where teens can go to keep up with the conversation, ask questions, express worries, share thoughts, ideas, and strategies about what has worked for them personally and in their schools. The authors want to hear from you. They want teens and young adults to join the national discussion to make schools a safe place.

Each Kindness

Each Kindness9780399246524_p0_v2_s260x420Each Kindness

Jacqueline Woodson, Author

E. B. Lewis, Illustrator

Nancy Paulsen Books, Fiction, 2012

Suitable for Ages: 4 -8

Themes: Acceptance, Kindness, Friendship

OpeningOne morning, as we settled into our seats, the classroom door opened and the principal came in.  She had a girl with her, and she said to us, “This is Maya.”  Maya looked down at the floor.  I think I heard her whisper Hello.

Synopsis:  When Chloe first meets Maya, she notices her clothes are old and tattered and the strap on one of her shoes is broken.   The teacher assigns Maya to sit next to Chloe.  Maya manages to smile and say hello, but Chloe turns and looks out the window.  Chloe and her friends play and eat lunch together, but ignore Maya’s attempts to join them.  Whenever Mayas asks to play with the other girls, they say no.  Then one day Maya’s seat is empty.  After their teacher talks about kindness and its ripple effect, Chloe realizes that she and her friends have been wrong in their treatment of Maya.  Is it to late?

Why I like this book:  I am a Jacqueline Woodson fan.  She takes on relevant subjects for children, like kindness. Her text is lyrical.  Each Kindness is a story that will stay with a child.  I am pleased there is no tidy ending in this story.  Maya is gone.  Chloe is left to think about her actions and how she lost an opportunity to make things right with Maya.  The soft watercolor illustrations by E.B. Lewis really set the tone for the book and convey a lot of emotion.  The last illustration is priceless and beautifully expresses Chloe’s sadness and feeling of loss.  A beautiful collaboration between Woodson and Lewis.  I also reviewed another book they collaborated on The Other Side.

Resources:  This is a great discussion book for the classroom.  It focuses on the ripple effect of our actions towards others.   Visit Jacqueline Woodson at her website and learn more.

Awards:  Coretta Scott King Honor Book, 2013 Jane Addams Peace Award, 2013 Charlotte Zolotow Award, Best Book of 2012 – School Library Journal

Stand Up!

Stand Up!187008865Stand Up!

Lisa Roth, M.D. & Karen Siris, Ed.D, authors

Marsha Levitin, illustrations

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, Fiction,  August 2012

Suitable for: 6 and up

Themes:  Bullying, Standing Up, Friendship, Relational Aggression

Opening/Synopsis: “When I wake up in the morning, I like to think about what fun I am going to have that day.  Today I am happy because one of my friend is coming over after school to play.”  The narrator in this book is lucky to have friends who like and support him at school.  He realizes that this isn’t true for all the kids,  especially Jamie, who wants to play kick ball during recess.  She is teased and called mean names by Alex and other kids.  The narrator observes how Alex knocks Jamie’s sandwich on the floor and stamps on it and shoves her into the locker in the hallway.   He realizes that things need to change, even if he’s afraid of Alex.  He notices the kids at school who are kind, helpful and work together.  He comes up with a plan to stop bullying at the school and writes a note to his caring classmates: “Meet me on the monkey bars during recess to be part of a secret mission.  See you then.”  The Caring Majority is born and there is power in their numbers to “stand up” for themselves and their classmates.

Why I like this book:  Lisa Roth, M.D. and Karen Siris, Ed.D. have written a powerful book about kids solving their own problems in a positive way without asking adults to intervene.  This compelling story gives parents and teachers the opportunity to discuss positive ways of preventing bullying at school.  The artwork is unique and done in muted pastels.  Each page is a picture of feet, which is very symbolic in the story and to the bully’s reaction.   Very creative idea.

Resources:  The authors have provided a back page with a Teacher’s Guide and Discussion Questions.  There is information about starting a Caring Majority in your school.  Write to bullyinterventionexperts@gmail.com.  You may visit Lisa Roth, M.D. at her website, The Magical Journey.  Karen Siris, Ed.D, is a principal and professor dedicated to preventing bullying in her school district.  She is recognized for the work she has done creating a caring majority of “upstanding students in her Long Island school.

This book has been provided to me free of charge by the author/publisher in exchange for an honest review of the work. 

Because Amelia Smiled

Because Amelia Smiled178344784Because Amelia Smiled

David Ezra Stein, author and illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction,  September 2012

Suitable for:  Ages 4 -8

Theme:  A child’s smile inspires happiness, kindness and love

Opening/Synopsis“Because Amelia smiled, coming down the street…Mrs. Higgins smiled, too.  She thought of her grandson, Lionel, in Mexico and baked some cookies to send to him.”  Lionel shares the cookies with his class and teaches them an English song.  His act inspires a student in his class to film her kickboxing skills, who in turn inspires a ballet club in England.  These acts of kindness start a ripple effect that takes the reader to England, Israel,  Paris, Italy and back to New York City and Amelia.  It only takes one big smile from a little girl to ignite a chain reaction from people around the world.

Why I like this book:  Stein’s book shows children the power of how we are all connected to people we know and don’t know.  Everything thing we do has an impact on someone else.   And, with the internet and social media, our actions within our global family becomes even more important.   With Amelia her unknowing act of kindness spreads like wildfire around the world.  Too often we see the negative and it is an inspiring message to share with children and adults.  And Stein urges readers of his book to “Pass it on.”  The illustrations are very detailed and done with pencil, water-soluble crayons, and watercolor.  Stein is the author-illustrator of Interrupting Chicken, which was awarded a Caldecott Honor.

Resources:  This picture book alone stands as a powerful tool for parents and teachers to encourage children to do acts of kindness at home, school,  and in their neighborhoods and communities. The Random Acts of Kindness Foundation is a great resource for classroom activities.  Candlewick has a page about the story behind the book.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.