The Find Out Files by Isabelle Filliozat and Virginie Limousin

The Find Out Files by Isabelle Filliozat and Virginie Limousin is a new series of four activity books that help children explore what it means to be themselves through their emotions, fears, anger and sibling relationships. Published by Magination Press, May 19, 2020, they target children ages 6-10. The four books include a Readers Note written for adults with information tools and tips for exploring the topic with their children. The pages are filled with creative, fun, engaging and expressive illustrations by Eric Veillié and Fred Benaglia.

Each interactive book has an animal that pops up throughout to guide young readers on their journey to self-discovery. The books range from 80 to 90 pages and include activities, drawing pages, crafts, short quizzes, cut-outs and stickers. The book can be used alone or with an adult. These books are timely and perfect for the summer.

Verdict: An engaging series that will help children focus, calm themselves and navigate relationships. They will provide hours of creative and imaginative activity! They are fun! They also make great gift books.

My Fears

Synopsis: This not-so-scary activity book helps kids understand why they get fearful and reassure them that everyone feels afraid sometimes. Some fears can be useful. Using the fun activities plus crafts, stickers and more, this book will help kids face their fears and learn to take chances, have fun, and be a less afraid kid! It includes a Readers Note written for adults with information tools and tips for exploring the topic with their children.

 

 

My Anger

Synopsis: This useful activity book will help kids understand that getting angry is a normal part of life. It may be a bit uncomfortable at times, but it’s OK if kids need to be mad! Children will explore anger through fun activities coupled with humorous illustrations and will discover what it means to be angry, why it happens to everyone, and how to better handle it. Allowing children to work through their anger will help them better understand themselves, others, and the world. It will help them establish their sense of self and self-confidence.

 

My Emotions

Synopsis: This clever activity book is a fun-filled tool for kids to discover self-expression and awareness. “Sometimes you may want break things, or want to run as fast as you can. Sometimes you want to jump with joy or want to cry. Emotions can be all over the place!” This book offers kids all sorts of information to nourish and appreciate their emotional life. Young readers will learn how to name their emotions, understand and accept their feelings, and develop emotional self-awareness so they can get on with the business of being a kid.

 

 

My Sibling

Synopsis: This helpful activity book offers activities to help kids get along with their brothers and sisters. Kids think that they are expected to love their brothers and sisters unconditionally, but sibling relationships can be really complicated. This book covers jealousy, fairness, sharing, parent-child  relationships, and tons more to helps kids find a common ground with their siblings if things get too fraught or upsetting.

 

 

*Review copies provided by the publisher in exchange for a review.

Way Past Mad by Hallee Adelman

Way Past Mad

Hallee Adelman, Author

Sandra de la Prada, Illustrator

Albert Whitman & Company, Fiction, Mar. 1, 2020

Suitable for Ages: 5-7

Themes: Anger, Emotions and feelings, Families, Friendship

Opening: Nate messed up my room. It made me mad.

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Keya is mad. Way past mad. The kind of mad that starts and swells and spreads like a rash. She kicks, rocks and yells at her best friend and says things that hurts.

Now Keya doesn’t like what her mad made her do. Can she find a way past mad?

Why I like this book:

Hallee Adelman’s entertaining picture book opens a lot of opportunities to talk about emotions and feelings. The cover on the book is priceless and hints at what’s to come. Sandra de la Prada’s illustrations are bold, colorful and perfectly express Keya’s emotions and compliment the entire story.

There are many books that deal with childhood anger, but there is a parent in place to guide the child.  In Way Past Mad, Keya finds her own way to deal with her anger even if it means making big mistakes. First she kicks rocks as she walks, runs off pent up energy, trips and falls on the sidewalk, and says hurtful things to her best friend. Do they help her feel less angry? No! But hurting her best friend wakes her up to what her anger can do to someone else. You’ll have to read the story to find out how Keya resolves her anger. Kids will laugh when they see and hear themselves in similar situations. There are many teachable moments in this story. 

Resources:  This is a wonderful opportunity to talk with children about how they deal with their emotions. Encourage them to draw a picture of what their anger looks like.  Ask them what they do when they feel angry — yell, throw things, leave the room? Is it fun feeling angry? Help children make a list of things that will help them face their anger in the future. Then ask kids to draw a picture of when they feel happy, peaceful, surprised and excited. Which picture do they like better — angry or happy?

Hallee Adelman tries not to stomp or yell when she’s mad. Most days, she uses her PhD in education, works on documentary films, and eats sour gummies (which make her face look extra mad). She lives near Philadelphia, where he funny family and two dogs make her smile. Visit Hallee at her website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by author.

You Weren’t With Me by Chandra Ghosh Ippen

You Weren’t with Me

Chandra Ghosh Ippen, Author

Erich Ippen Jr., Illustrator

Piplo Productions, Fiction, Feb. 12, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 3-7

Themes: Separation, Fear, Understanding, Love, Healing

Book Synopsis:

Little Rabbit and Big Rabbit are together after a difficult separation, but even though they missed each other, Little Rabbit is not ready to cuddle up and receive Big Rabbit’s love. Little Rabbit needs Big Rabbit to understand what it felt like when they were apart. “Sometimes I am very mad. I don’t understand why you weren’t with me,” says Little Rabbit. “I worry you will go away again.” Big Rabbit listens carefully and helps Little Rabbit to feel understood and loved. This story was designed to help parents and children talk about difficult separations, reconnect, and find their way back to each other.

What I like about this book:

Chandra Ghosh Ippen’s timely book addresses  a wide variety of painful situations in which a child is separated from a parent: divorce, military deployments, parental incarcerations, parental drug abuse and immigration-related separations. Indeed it is a treasure!  We need more stories like this to help jump-start the important conversations about challenging separations between children and parents. Only then can healing begin.

The animals characters make this book a perfect choice in dealing with tough issues. It isn’t a happy homecoming story, as both Little Rabbit and Big Rabbit have to learn to deal with their feelings and get use to each other. Little Rabbit is angry that Big Rabbit left, worries he/she may leave again and doesn’t trust it won’t happen again. The author gives Little Rabbit time to share his concerns before Big Rabbit responds and they find a way to reconnect.

Ippen’s illustrations are rendered in soft pastels and are priceless. The text is minimal with the illustrations carrying much of the story. There is an occasional burst of color that signals the feelings being shared. I especially like the physical distance and space between the rabbits throughout the story.  Little Rabbit needs time and space until trust is established again.  Slowly they move closer to one another. And the facial expressions are spot on for the feelings being communicated. Great collaboration between the author and illustrator.

Resource: This book is a resource due to the way it is written. It will encourage many important discussions. I think it would be fun to take some of the expressive illustrations and have children fill in their own dialogue.

Chandra Ghosh Ippen combines her love of story and cute creatures with her training in clinical psychology. She is the author of Once I Was Very Very Scared. She has also co-authored over 20 publications related to trauma and diversity-informed practice and has over 10 years of experience conducting training nationally and Internationally.

Erich Ippen Jr. was always interested as a boy to drawing cartoons and character designs. In his professional career, he has created visual effects for movies like Rango, Harry Potter, The Avengers, Star Wars and many other films. He is also a singer, songwriter, music producer and founding member of the local San Francisco band, District 8.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the author.

My Quiet Ship by Hallee Adelman

 

My Quiet Ship

Hallee Adelman, Author

Sonia Sánchez, Illustrator

Albert Whitman & Company, Fiction,  Oct. 1, 2018

Suitable for Ages: 3-5

Themes: Conflict, Yelling, Anger, Coping skills, Family relationships, Imagination

Opening: Whenever I hear the yelling, I run to the spot.

Synopsis:

When the arguments begin between his parents gets bad, Quinn escapes to his special place, the Quiet Ship, where he’s the commander. Together with his faithful stuffed animal crew, Quinn can shut out the yelling that makes him sad and scared, and travel somewhere else — his imagination. His Quiet Ship takes him far away from the yelling.

But one day, the ship breaks. Quinn must be brave and find a way to tell his parents how their fighting makes him feel.

Why I like this book:

Hallee Adelman has written a sensitive and heartfelt story about a boy, Quinn, who builds a safe haven for himself when his parents start arguing. When their yelling escalates,  Quinn’s quiet spaceship allows him to blast off and travel through the clouds, stars and universe to a place that is peaceful. “Far, far away / from here… / From there… / From that yelling.”

The narrative is simple and imaginative and speaks a language children will easily understand. Through Quinn, children will learn coping skills to help them share their fears, sadness and worries.  Quinn bravely works through his anger towards his parents, finds his voice and confronts his parents.

Resources: This powerful book is an excellent conversation starter for both children and parents about handling conflict. Is yelling necessary? Are there more effective ways of dealing with anger? It is important that a children feels safe to discuss their feelings.

Sonia Sánchez’s illustrations are magnificent and really give this story life. The are bold and the yelling takes the form of angry, jagged streaks or heavy clouds that suffocate Quinn. Quinn’s desperate expressions are priceless as they communicate his anguish. She uses both traditional and digital media in her artwork.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the publisher.

Anh’s Anger – Perfect Picture Book

Anh's Anger9781888375947_p0_v1_s260x420.jpg.Anh’s Anger

Gail Silver, Author

Christiane Kromer, Illustrator

Plum Blossom Books, Fiction 2009

Suitable for Ages: 4-7

Themes:  Handling Anger, Grandfathers, Mindfulness

Opening:  Anh was in the living room building a tower, the tallest tower he’d ever built.  His grandfather was in the kitchen making dinner.  “Anh” Grandfather called out. “Dinner is ready.”  

Synopsis:  Anh is building a block tower when his grandfather calls him for dinner.  He wants to keep playing — just one more block.  Anh erupts into anger and knocks down his tower.  When he says hurtful things, his grandfather tells Anh to go to his room and sit with his anger.  In his bedroom, Anh meets his anger in the form of a hairy, red creature.  They talk, howl, spin in circles and beat the ground with their hands.  Anh is so exhausted he’s ready sit and be still with his anger.

Why I like this book:  Gail Silver has written an enchanting book for both children, parents and teachers.  It is based on the teachings about mindfulness and Buddhism by Thich Nhat Hanh.  It encourages parents to stay calm and caring when their child has a melt down.  It helps children find ways of handling their own anger in a safe place.  This is an excellent book to teach children coping skills that they can use throughout their lives.  Christiane’s beautiful and lively Asian illustrations are mixed-media artwork that include paper and silk collages with realistic brush and pencil drawings.  You can visit Gail Silver  and Christiane Kromer at their websites.

Resources:  Encourage children to draw pictures about what their anger looks like.  Then ask them to draw a picture of what their anger look like when they calm down?

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.