Earth Hour: A Lights-Out Event for Our Planet by Nanette Heffernan

Earth Hour 2020 – Global Event

March 28, 2020 8:30 p.m. (local time)

Earth Hour: A Lights-Out Event for Our Planet

Nanette Heffernan, Author

Bao Luu, Illustrator

Charlesbridge, Nonfiction,  2020

Suitable for Ages:

Themes: Energy conservation, Climate changes, Earth Hour, Global events

Opening: “All over the world, millions of people use energy, every day, every night.”

Bookjacket Synopsis:

Each year, Earth Hour is celebrated on a Saturday night near the equinox in March. At 8:30 p.m., in every time zone across the world, lights fade to black for this special event.

Observing  Earth Hour is a promise to conserve energy. Turning out nonessential lights at home and in public places for one hour is a symbol of global action.

From the Sydney Opera House to the Great Wall of China, from the Eiffel Tower to the Statue of Liberty, and from one home to the next, every light matters.

Why I like this book:

Nanette Heffernan empowers children to see how they can conserve energy and make a positive change and difference at home, school, in communities and around the world. This is my favorite kind of book to share, because kids can do amazing things to help climate change on the planet — and they know it!

There is simplicity in her lyrical text , which allows children to read, study and question how they use energy personally and how it’s used globally. What would their lives be like without energy?  There is a lot of diversity depicted in text and artwork.

Bao Luu’s richly-colored illustrations compliment her text with short visual scenes depicting how children and their families use energy daily to how energy is used to light up the iconic global landmarks at night.  His artwork momentarily plummets readers into darkness when the lights are turned off, but are replaced with beautiful midnight blue illustrations accented by the moon and stars shining brightly on Mother Earth.

The author first encountered the lights going out on the Golden Gate Bridge one night as she crossed. She later learned it was in honor of Earth Hour and became an instant fan. She pledged “to share this event with one million people.” For Heffernan, “We turn off out lights as a pledge to live more sustainably and conserve energy – not just during Earth Hour but during every hour and every day throughout the year.”

Resources: Read the back matter at the end of the book. Check out the Earth Hour website to learn about ways of getting involved or events near you. On March 28, for one hour, turn off the lights, TVs, and other appliances in your home. Invite your neighbors and friends to do the same. Light candles, play board games. Write a short story about your experience and your thoughts about the importance of conserving energy.

Nanette Heffernan is a children’s author and sustainability consultant. Her lifelong goal is to make Earth a better home for children whether by making them laugh or addressing environmental issues that will affect their generation. Although she loves her leadership roles in the community, she is most fulfilled while dressed in school lunch trash and visiting schools and festivals to talk to thousands of kids about the importance of protecting our environment. She is pleased to share her efforts have earned her three Environmental Awards of Excellence. She lives near San Francisco, CA with her family, Koda the dog, George the cat, and eight chickens, all named Companion.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Book reviewed from a library copy.

Sheila Says We’re Weird

Sheila Says We’re Weird

Ruth Ann Smalley, Author

Jennifer Emery, Illustrator

Tilbury House Publishers, Fiction, April 2011

Suitable for:  Ages 5 and up

Themes:  Energy Conservation, Green Living, Neighbors, Differences

Opening Sheila lives next door.  She’s friends with my little sister, Tina.  Sheila asks lots of questions.  She hangs over the back fence when we peg clothes on the line.  “Why Don’t you drop those in the dryer?  Did it break?  Sheila asks.”  “This is our solar dryer, Sheila.  The clothes get dry without using any electricity.”

Synopsis:  Sheila follows her neighbors through the seasons when they plant a garden and grow their own food, mow the lawn with a push mower, brew sun tea, ride bicycles to the farmer’s market to buy local food,  mulch trees and plants with leaves, and use a wood burning stove to warm the house.   She finds their lifestyle interesting, but unfamiliar and weird.   But, Sheila enjoys the home-grown meals made with fresh vegetables and playing with Tina in front of the fire.  Perhaps they are weird in a good way.

Why I like this book:  What a great way to introduce kids to energy conservation!  Ruth Ann Smalley, is a holistic educator that writes about green living.  She won a Moonbeam Bronze Award for Picture Books for her book.  Living green can be a tough subject for kids who are used to modern conveniences.  But, it is important.  And Smalley has tackled the subject in a fun way.

Resources:  Click on Tilbury House Publishers  and Reach and Teach for activities and resources in the classroom.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Journey with me…

 

 

Special-needs-children-222x225Welcome to Children’s Books Heal!   I specifically chose to use “heal” in my blog name, because I felt it more inclusive of what I wanted to communicate — books have the power to heal.  Many of the books I plan to  review will focus on children and teens with special needs.   It’s  a broad category ranging from autism, Asperger’s syndrome, cancer, cerebral palsy, hearing and visual impairments to anxiety, ADHD, intellectual disability, adoption, divorce and grief.  I also will target books that are  multicultural,  about peace, conflict resolution, virtues, and the power of music and the arts to heal.  Each book will be hand-picked for the quality of its message.

In January 2011, Scholastic, the largest publisher of children’s books, released the Top 10 Trends in Children’s Books from 2010.    Among those trends was an increase in fiction with main characters who have special needs.  Examples included My Brother Charlie, Marcel in the Real World, and Mockingbird — all great books I will share.

According to a study published by Brigham Young University professors in the December 2010 issue of Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities,  “Despite an increasingly positive portrayal  of characters with disabilities in Newbery Award-winning books, there still is not an accurate representation of the nearly 7 million children with disabilities attending U.S. public schools.”   They studied Newbery Award and Honor books published from 1975 to 2009.

“We are hoping that this will be a call to authors,”  said Professor Tina Dyches.  “We’ve got so many wonderful authors in the world and we would love to see more inclusive characterizations in high quality books where kids with disabilities are being recognized for who they are no not just the limitations of their disabilities.”

I am a journalist and writer who  hopes to review high quality books for children and students with special needs.  I bring with me many life experiences.  My husband and I have a large blended family, with two adopted children, one a foreign adoption.  We have parented children with disabilities and special needs.  I also know what it is like to live as an adult with a disability, as I had a serious brain injury seven years ago.  And, I know how grief impacts children and families.  In 2009, our grandson was a casualty of the war in Iraq.   These experiences have influenced my choice in writing books for children, and the theme for my blog.

Please join me in my journey of writing and blogging.

Patricia