Our Future: How Kids are Taking Action by Janet Wilson

Multicultural Children’s Book Day, Jan. 31, 2020

#ReadYourWorld

Our Future: How Kids are Taking Action

Janet Wilson, Author and Illustrator

Second Story Press, Nonfiction, Sep. 10, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes: Child Activists, Making a Difference, Climate Action, Cyberbullying, Gun Violence, Social Justice

Opening: “As anyone will admit, listening to the news can be scary — hurricanes, school shootings, forest fires, wars. What are we to make of a world that seems ever more troubled and fragile?… And so kids are taking action, rising to question the sanity of common practices.” 

Book Synopsis:

From climate action to cyberbullying, from gun violence to animal protection, these young activists have brought about real change.

Young people from across the globe are raising awareness about what issues matter to them most and working to protect the future of the worlds we all share.

American Jaelun Parkerson kneels with his football teammates during the national anthem to protest racial injustice, Canadian Autumn Peltier spoke in front of the United Nations to raise awareness about water pollution; and Tiassa Mutunkei from Kenya started a club for young people to stop elephants from being killed for their ivory tusks. All of them are making a difference for the future of our plaent — and you can too!

Why I like this book:

Janet Wilson writes empowering and timely nonfiction books about ordinary young people who see injustice around them and take action  — no matter how small or large — and make a contribution in their communities, countries and world.

Wilson’s books are my favorite kind of books to share because there is an urgency in our world and kids are concerned that adults aren’t doing enough. We hear it in the plea from 15-year-old Greta Thunberg of Sweden who is leading worldwide protests for climate change and speaking before the United Nations because she feels leaders are failing her generation. Meet Melati and Isabel Wijsen of Indonesia, who saw firsthand the negative impacts of plastic pollution and petitioned their government to ban plastic bags in Bali.

These children and teens are bold and brave and are working for the rights of children in a peaceful way.  Wilson captures their engaging stories in a double-page spread which features a warm and beautifully painted illustration of the featured child on the left and text and photographs about the child’s contribution on the right, along with a colorful sidebar of other kids doing similar projects globally. Read their stories and you will be inspired! This multiculatural book belongs in school libraries.

Resources: The book is a resource. At the end there is a section for students on “What YOUth Can Do,” that will spark many lively discussions and encourage kids to think about what they may do alone or together to make the world a better place. What will you do? Visit Janet Wilson at her website.

Quote:

“Young people are a part of the largest generation in history — two billion strong. Around the globe young people are coming together to build a movement for success…Yes we face a lot of big problems, but we can start fixing them through a lot of small actions…If each one of you takes action, you will create a wave of action like this world has never, ever seen. Be a part of two billion acts for good. Because, step by step, little by little, we will get to a better world. Together let’s get the job done.” Amina Mohammed, UN Deputy Secretary-General

Janet Wilson is an artist and author of many picture books on child activism including  Our Earth: How Kids are Saving the Planet, and Our Rights: How Kids are Changing the World, and Our Heroes: How Kids are Making a Difference, which are popular with educators and students. She also wrote Shannen and the Dream for a School and Severn and the Day She Silenced the World.  Winter’s books  have won many awards.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by publisher.

We Say #Never Again: Reporting by Parkland Student Journalists

We Say #Never Again: Reporting by the Parkland Student Journalists

Melissa Falkowski & Eric Garner, Editing by MSD Teachers

Crown Books for Young Readers, Nonfiction, Oct. 2, 2019

Pages: 272

Suitable for Ages: 14 and up

Themes: School shooting, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Student reporters, Social activism

Finalist: Senior High Nonfiction category of the Cybils Award, which will be announced Feb. 14, 2019

Book Synopsis: Our story. Our lives. Our School.

While the world reported on the events at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Feb. 14, 2018, the students themselves were reporting the story and living through it. Many of the most impactful voices in the #NeverAgain movement came through the school’s journalism and broadcasting programs, and they have credited their teachers and the training they received for allowing them to think critically and communicate clearly – enabling them to launch a movement that has inspired a nation.

But how do student journalists report effectively when they have become the story? How do the write about loss when it impacts their own lives so deeply? The insight the students have gained about the media, ethics and researching the public has not only motivated others to join this movement, but has encouraged them to start movements of their own.

Reporting from inside the media storm that followed the Parkland tragedy, these clear-eyed and passionate young reporters bring a fresh perspective to a crucial American issue, while shining a bright light on the importance of journalism in our free society.

Why I love this book:

This sensitive and convincingly penned book is a natural outcome of the events of the horrific shooting of 17 students and faculty members at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas (MSD) on Feb. 14, 2018. It is a story that only the students can tell. It is raw, honest and powerful. It is a hopeful story about a generation who wants to make a difference in their world.

The book was written by the students, but edited by teachers Melissa Falkowski (journalism) and Eric Garner (broadcasting). Each teacher wrote compelling opening chapters in the book that gave an account of the events that fateful day and how the student reporters and broadcasters stepped forward as professionals to report for the school newspaper, website and TV station. The teachers provide  convincing arguments for the importance of supporting high school journalism/broadcasting programs and student-run newspapers.

The students contributed short chapters about being thrust into the spotlight, dealing with criticism, meeting politicians, managing their own trauma, becoming activists, reporting extraordinary acts by MSD students and teachers, dealing with criticism, and managing their own trauma. The book is well documented with photographs of people and events.

The students were trained and prepared by their teachers in the MSD journalism and broadcasting programs. They were part of the story, but they reported the story. From the start the editorial staff decided they would not name the shooter and give him the notoriety he sought. They felt it would be irresponsible journalism. He was not mentioned in the school newspaper or when staff members were interviewed by the national media, spoke at rallies and wrote this magnificent book. It was refreshing to see these students stand strong in their beliefs of what was right and wrong in the reporting of this monumental event in their lives. Their reporting was impartial as they held to a standard that surpasses much of the sensationalism we see in  media today. When they moved into the role of activism at the forefront of the March for Our Lives movement against gun violence, they were prepared and supported.

I studied journalism in high school and in college. What stood out for me was how the MSD multi-media programs inspired high schools students to find their voices and stand up for a cause they believed in — gun violence in America. This book is an excellent discussion book for high school students and teachers. It belongs in every school library.

Melissa Falkowski has been the faculty adviser of the Eagle Eye for the last three years. She has been teaching English and creative writing at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School for 14 years. Once a student journalist herself, Melissa became a teacher to empower students and help them find their voices through journalism.

Eric Garner leads the Television Production Academy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, preparing students for the broadcast journalism and film industries. He has been a television production and film instructor for over 25 years and has worked at WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida’s News Channel, and WTVJ in Miami/Fort Lauderdale.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from a library copy.