Grow Kind, Grow Grateful, Grow Happy by John Lasser and Sage Foster-Lasser

Grow Kind

Magination Press, Fiction, Mar. 3, 2020

Ages: 4-8

Synopsis: Blackberries for Keisha. Sunflowers for Mr. Carrol. Ripe tomatoes fo Ms. Stevens. Peppers and corn for Matt and Mitch. Potatoes for Dr. Thompson.

Kiko works hard in her garden. She grows, nurtures, cultivates and harvests her fresh fruits and veggies and shares her bounty with her friends, neighbors, and family. She shows readers how easy it is to be kind to others, and how kindness can create a happiness within themselves and with everyone around.

Grow Grateful 

Fiction, Oct. 15, 2018

Synopsis: Head off with Kiko on a camping trip with her class and how she figures out what being grateful is and what it feels like. Throughout the trip, Kiko discovers different things she appreciates about her family, friends, and experiences. The warm feeling of gratefulness can come from anywhere — a beautiful sunset, toasted marshmallows, help from a friend when you’re feeling afraid, or sharing kindness with others. Kiko grows grateful.

 

Grow Happy

Fiction, Feb. 13, 2017

Synopsis: Kiko is a gardener. She takes care of her garden with seeds, soil, water, and sunshine. In Grow Happy, Kiko also demonstrates how she cultivates happiness, just like she does in her garden. Using positive psychology and choice theory, this book shows children that they have the tools to nurture their own happiness and live resiliently. Just as Kiko possesses the resources needed—seeds, soil, water—to build a thriving garden, she also has the tools to nurture her own happiness—including social support, choices, and problem-solving skills.

What I like about this series of books:

This is a perfect time to share John Lasser and Sage Foster-Lasser’s charming series for children about cultivating kindness, gratitude and joy in their own lives, and sharing it with others. Children are learning very early that the world is a tough place in which to grow up. Giving kids the tools to get it done will be a tremendous boost. And these three books contribute to that effort in a delightful way.

The narrative flows effortlessly. “My name is Kiko. I grow kind. I will show you how, but first, I have a question for you.” Christopher Lyles’s cheerful and textured illustrations invite children to spend time pondering each theme! Happy and colorful, they fit the tone for each book.

Each book features a lovable protagonist, Kiko, who is of Asian heritage. She appears to be adopted because her parent are caucasian. The series features a cast of supporting characters that are diverse. She also guides children through her adventures.

Resources: Each book includes a Note to Parents and Caregivers with information that will help create opportunities to explore the social and emotional skills that are important to our overall well being: kindness, gratitude and happiness. In these books children will learn how to develop these skills within themselves and in their relationships with others.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copies provided by the publisher in exchange for a review.

Princess Rosie’s Rainbows by Bette Killion

Princess Rosie51j68JTFCaL__SX399_BO1,204,203,200_Princess Rosie’s Rainbows

Bette Killion, Author

Kim Jacobs, Illustrator

Wisdom Tales, Fiction, Oct. 7, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Fairy Tales, Princesses, Happiness, Rainbows

Opening: “Once upon a time in a faraway kingdom there lived a loving King and Queen. They ruled in a magical land where rainbows stretched from peak to ocean. Each day they wished for a child to share their castle.”

Synopsis: On the day the princess was born, a full rainbow spanned the kingdom. The King and Queen named their daughter the Princess of Rose-colored Light. But everyone called her Princess Rosie. She grew up loving rainbows and was happiest when they appeared in the sky. On the days no rainbows appeared, her smile turned into a frown and she felt sad. Princess Rosie had everything she could ever want — a dog, books, music, toys and games — but what she really wanted was a forever rainbow. Her father offered his people a bag of gold if anyone could bring the princess a forever rainbow. Visitors from other lands traveled to the castle with rainbows made of silk, glass, and jewels. Some were pictures in books, banners you could wave and food you could eat.  But Princess Rosie wanted a real rainbow. Her parents wondered if their daughter would ever be happy again. One day a wise woman from the farthest village arrived to talk with the princess. Perhaps she held the secret to making Rosie smile again.

Why I like this book:

Bette Killion’s original fairy tale is a captivating read at bedtime. It will engage children as they try to figure out what is a forever rainbow and what will make Princess Rosie happy if the royal riches don’t make her smile. This beautiful tale packs a powerful message for children about the source of true and lasting happiness lies within. This is an important lesson for children to learn at a young age. The text is written in prose and children will find the language appealing in this memorable tale.

You can tell by the book cover that Kim Jacobs’ illustrations are stunning and magical. Each illustration is intricately detailed and will whisk children’s imaginations to another period in time. The soft, warm pastels compliment the story. This is a beautiful collaboration between author and illustrator.

Resources: Have a discussion with children about what makes them happy. Is it something that is material and they will tire of or is something uniquely special that makes them feel warm inside and last forever. There is a simple science lesson at the end of the book about rainbows and how to make your own rainbow.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.