I, Cosmo by Carlie Sorosiak

I, Cosmo

Carlie Sorosiak, Author

Walker Books, Fiction, Dec. 24, 2019

Suitable for ages: 8-12

Themes: Dogs, Golden retriever, Family relationships, Divorce, Humor

Publisher Synopsis:

Ever since Cosmo became a big brother to Max ten years ago, he’s known what his job was: to protect his boy and make him happy. Through many good years marked by tennis balls and pilfered turkey, torn-up toilet paper and fragrant goose poop, Cosmo has doggedly kept his vow.

Until recently, his biggest problems were the evil tutu-wearing sheepdog he met on Halloween and the arthritis in his own joints. But now, with Dad-scented blankets appearing on the couch and arguing voices getting louder, Cosmo senses a tougher challenge ahead.

When Max gets a crazy idea to teach them both a dance routine for a contest, how can Cosmo refuse, stiff hips or no? Max wants to remind his folks of all the great times they’ve had together dancing — and make them forget about the “d” word that’s making them all cry. Told in the open, optimistic, unintentionally humorous voice of a golden retriever, I, Cosmo will grab readers from the first page — and remind them that love and loyalty transcend whatever life throws your way.

Why I like this book:

Cosmo is a grand narrator for Carlie Sorosiak’s humorous story about a golden retriever protecting and loving his human family through many life challenges — including his own aging. This story will engage readers and make them laugh as they experience the world through Cosmo’s eyes and senses.

When parents are fighting, there is nothing like a dog like Cosmo, to comfort and ease the anxiety for children. Cosmo is always there for twelve-year-old Max and five-year-old Emmaline, when their parents argue. He’s their best friend, fiercely loyal, and good for hugs. Readers will relate to this heartfelt story of unconditional licks of love.

Dog lovers will fall deeply in love with Cosmo — even adults. We all wonder what our dogs think as they watch us silly humans go about our business — pardon the pun.  We learn very quickly about everything Cosmo thinks. First of all he hates Halloween and the silly costumes he’s made to wear. But he likes bacon and sausage over kibbles. He dislikes the spoonful of peanut butter that Mom feeds him with his meds hidden in the center. When she turns her back, he hides his pill. He’s puzzled by how inferior human noses are. He loves to  sniff and roll in fresh animals scents, swim in the ocean play hide-and-seek, watch dog shows, but also the movie Grease. But as his aches and pains increase with age, Cosmo’s not fond of snow and ice, and jumping on people to greet them.

Carlie Sorosiak grew up in North Carolina and holds two master’s degrees: one in English from the University of Oxford and another in creative writing and publishing from City, University of London. Her life goals include traveling to all seven continents and fostering many polydactyl cats. She currently splits her time between the United States and the United Kingdom, hoping to gain an accent like Madonna’s. Visit her online at at her website.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy from the publisher. Or I won it in a giveaway.

The Runaways by Ulf Stark

The Runaways

Ulf Stark, Author

Kitty Crowther, Illustrator

Gecko Press, Fiction, Apr. 2, 2019

Pages: 144

Suitable for Ages: 6-11

Themes: Grandfather, Illness, Hospital, Lying, Runaways, Multigenerational families, Loss

Synopsis:

Grandpa is in the hospital and hating it. He swears at the nurses and makes trouble for everyone. Dad finds it too stressful to visit. But Gottfried Junior loves his Grandpa and visits him as often as he’s allowed, and when he’s not allowed, he goes anyway. He even sneaks him forbidden foods and beverages.

Grandpa thinks only of the place he was happiest — the island where he lived with Grandma. He wants to go back one last time, but they won’t let him out of the hospital.

Gottfried Junior and Grandpa take things into their own hands. If running away is the only way to the island, then they’ll be runaways.

Why I like this book:

I have to admit the title and cover of this book caught my eye. As I leafed through the pages, I knew that it would be a book that would resonate with children who have ailing grandparents and perhaps children who are ill. It’s packed with adventure, some clever planning, a good dose of humor, and sweet memories.

Every grandparent deserves a compassionate and loyal grandchild like Gottfried Junior, who outsmarts his parent to find ways to make secret trips to visit his grandpa at the hospital. Gottfried listens to his grumpy grandpa, his angry rants about the horrible food and being confined to a bed after he broke his leg twice. But Gottfried also remembers all the fun adventures he had with his grandpa. Together they hatch a plan to spring Grandpa from the hospital for two days, without Gottfried’s parents knowing.

The execution of the plan rests entirely on Gottfried, who arranges all of the details which include faking an overnight footbal trip; arranging the food; hiring a baker friend to help him wheel Grandpa out of the hospital and driving them to the dock to take a boat to the island. Everything goes off without a hitch, but Gottfried has to wrestle with “is it ever a good thing to lie sometimes?”

It is important for children to see how Gottfried’s grandpa handles the end of his life. He has one wish, to return to the home he built for his wife and spend time there remembering all the good in his life. In making the trip with Grandpa, Gottfried learns that death is not something to fear, that it’s important to remember joyful memories, and find closure with family members. I won’t spoil the beautiful ending.

The Runaways is written by Swedish author, Ulf Stark, and has been translated into English. It has a European feel to it, especially with the beautiful colored-pencil illustrations by Kitty Crowther that grace the chapters and give readers an additional experience.

Quote:

“I’d helped him get to the old house he’d built one last time. He’d been able to breathe in the smell of the sea. And I’d been down to the cellar and collected the last jar of lingonberry jam that he said somehow still had Grandma in it.” Page 72

Ulf Stark was born in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1944. He has written around thirty books for children and young adults, translated into more than twenty languages. He has won many prizes in Sweden and internationally, including the German Youth Literature Prize and the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

Finding Orion by John David Anderson

Finding Orion

John David Anderson, Author

Walden Pond Press, Fiction, May 7, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Pages: 368

Themes: Death, Grandfather, Family relationships, Fathers and sons, Love, Humor

Book Synopsis:

Rion Kwirk comes from a rather odd family. His mother named him and his sisters after her favorite constellations, and his father makes funky-flavored jellybeans for a living. One sister acts as if she’s always on stage, and the other is a walking dictionary. But no one in the family is more odd than Rion’s grandfather, Papa Kwirk.

He’s the kind of guy who shows up on his motorcycle only on holidays handing out crossbows and stuffed squirrels as presents. Rion has always been fascinated by Papa Kwirk, especially as his son—Rion’s father—is the complete opposite. Where Dad is predictable, nerdy, and reassuringly boring, Papa Kwirk is mysterious, dangerous, and cool.

Which is why, when Rion and his family learn of Papa Kwirk’s death and pile into the car to attend his “Funneral” and pay their respects, Rion can’t help but feel that that’s not the end of his story. That there’s so much more to Papa Kwirk to discover. He doesn’t know how right he is.

Why I like this book:

This is one wacky story and it tops my list for the oddest book I’ve ever read. That being said, it’s also charming and funny, and heart-warming and downright bizarre. Anderson takes quirkiness to a new level when a singing clown shows up to tell them Rion’s grandfather, Frank, has died. Who does that? What a great “gotcha” opening for readers. You are compelled to read on.

The plot is hilarious and engaging. The “FUNNeral” is held in the Greensburg, Illinois town park, with speeches, a barbershop quartet, a marching band and food trucks to feed the guests. This is not your normal send-off, but it is original, fulfills Papa Kwirk’s final  wishes and allows the community to come together to share happy memories of “Jimmy,” a man they loved, with his family. Rion’s father is done with all of the untraditional nonsense and ready to head home when Aunt Gertie announces that there is a scavenger hunt to find Papa Kwirk’s ashes. The hunt is important journey in the story. It is an opportunity for everyone in the family to know Papa Kwirk better and to heal the divide between Rion’s father and grandfather.

Rion (Orion) is probably my favorite character because he is a smart and observant narrator, funny and awkward on his path to self-discovery. Rion may feel very ordinary among his odd parents and siblings, but he notices things that others don’t. The remainder of the characters are just plain fun and of course quirky. The sibling dynamics are delightfully normal with all the usual sibling pranks. And not to forget Cass’s pet python named Delilah.

I fell in love with the Kwirk family and their emotional journey as they explore the joy and pain, and regret and recovery of being a family. Readers will discover many laugh-out-loud and irreverent moments. I highly recommend this unforgettable book.

Favorite Quote:

“Seriously?” I shouted, my voice carrying through the amphitheater. “This freakin’ family can’t even die normally.”  Page 140

“One thing could be said for my grandfather, through: he was one of a kind. And there was a whole town full of people who would never forget him.” Page 335

John David Anderson is the author of many highly acclaimed books for kids, including Ms. Bixby’s Last Day as well as Posted, Granted, Sidekicked, and The Dungeoneers. Visit Anderson’s website for more information.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

Everybody’s Favorite Book by Mike Allegra

 

Everybody’s Favorite Book

Mike Allegra, Author

Claire Almon, Illustrator

Imprint/Macmillan Publishing Group, LLC, Fiction, Oct. 30, 2018

Suitable for Ages: 3-6

Themes: Heroes, Humor, Mystery, Fantasy, Big words, Poop jokes

Opening: “You are very lucky. You are reading Everybody’s Favorite Book. There is not one person anywhere who has a different favorite book. Do you want to know why this is everybody’s favorite book? I’ll explain. ”

Publisher’s Synopsis:

Anyone who says, “You can’t please everybody,” isn’t trying hard enough. At least, that’s what the cheeky narrator of this meta picture book thinks!

A “good” book may have a spaceman or a ninja or a cowboy, but Everybody’s Favorite Book has something better: a Space Ninja Cow. And that’s only the beginning. You like princesses? We got ‘em. Prefer a mystery? No sweat. Want the definition of gallimaufry? A good poop joke? A giant, carnivorous guinea pig? Spy kids? Check, check and check. And there’s more! Much more! This book has everything, for everybody! At least that’s what the cheeky narrator thinks!

Here’s hoping things don’t go awry. (Spoiler, they do.)

Why I like this book:

This clever and humorous picture book will appeal to kids who like to make up their own stories. And, they couldn’t have a better teacher — the outrageous and quirky author, Mike Allegra, who loves to think outside-the-box and make kids laugh. His book would make a great read-aloud in an elementary classroom.

A narrator guides readers through the story. With every page turn the story keeps changing because some readers don’t like violence, others want princesses, some prefer a mystery (missing Space Ninja Cow) and others want big words. As more characters appear, so does the chaos and the book becomes quite crowded. It becomes clear the narrator has lost control of his readers and finally shouts “STOP!”  How will the narrator regain control? Or will he?

Claire Almon’s cartoon-like illustrations are lively, colorful and hilarious. They add life to the story.

Resources: This is rambunctious and silly story will inspire reader’s imaginations. Encourage kids to choose a scene and write their own ending. Or have them draw the scene on paper. Make sure you check out Allegra’s website.

Mike Allegra is the author of the picture book, Sarah Gives Thanks. Under the pseudonym Roy L. Hinuss, Mike not-so secretly pens the Prince Not-So Charming chapter book series. He was the winner of the 2014 Highlights for Children Fiction Contest, a recipient of an Individual Artist Fellowship from the New Jersey State Council for the Arts, and a nominee for a 2017 Pushcart Prize.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Copy won in a book giveaway.

Prince Not-So Charming Series by Roy L. Hinuss

Prince Not-So Charming: Once Upon a Prank (Book 1)

Roy L. Hinuss, Author

Matt Hunt, Illustrator

Imprint of Macmillan Publishing Group, Fiction, Aug. 28, 2018

Suitable for Ages: 5-9

Themes: Prince, Duties, Dreams, Being true to yourself,  Court jester, Humor

Book Synopsis: Turns out being Prince Charming isn’t a fairy tale; it’s more like a fart joke.

Prince Carlos Charles Charming is the youngest in a long line of Royal Prince Charmings. But he’d much rather grow up to be a court jester. He dreams of juggling fire while riding a unicycle instead of fulfilling his princely duty. And the word “duty” always make him think of a poop joke.

But when a dragon is spotted in the Somewhat Enchanted woods, Carlos is going to have to figure out how to be a true Prince Charming fast. Because it’s a slay-or-get-slayed world out there.

Prince Not-So Charming: Her Royal Slyness (Book 2)

Aug. 28, 2018

Book Synopsis: Prince Charming is supposed to rescue a princess―but she has other ideas.

The youngest in a long line of Prince Charmings, Carlos is juggling a lot. That is, he is spending his time juggling balls in the air―instead of doing his princely duties.

But now he has a terrifying mission: There’s a princess trapped in a tower―the Tallest Tower, on Witch Island, surrounded by Witch Lake. You don’t need me to tell you how scary that sounds.

But Carlos soon discovers that rescuing a damsel in distress requires a damsel who’s in distress. This princess doesn’t need to be rescued―and definitely doesn’t need a prince charming.

Prince Not-So Charming: The Dork Knight (Book 3)

Nov. 13, 2018

Book Synopsis: Prince Carlos figuring out how to be charming even when locked in mortal combat.

Prince Carlos Charles Charming has a secret: He’d much rather tell jokes than be a prince. But when you’re the heir to Faraway Kingdom, you don’t always get what you want.

Which is why Carlos has to learn how to joust.

Carlos is surprisingly great at jousting, from spearing haystacks to smashing watermelons. But when a tournament rolls around, suddenly Carlos realizes he has to actually point his lance at other people―and they’ll point theirs back!

Prince Not-So Charming: The Dork Knight shows it’s hard to live up to the fairy tale―and that the best way to win a contest can be embracing your own dorkiness.

Prince Not-So Charming: Happily Ever Laughter (Book 4)

Nov. 13, 2018

Book Synopsis: Prince Charming faces his greatest challenge yet, a fancy party.

Prince Carlos Charles Charming isn’t the princeliest of princes. But he might be the funniest.

Unfortunately, being hilarious won’t help much at a birthday party thrown by an evil queen with no sense of humor. And if Carlos, his pet dragon, and his friend Pinky don’t bring the right presents and fail to dance perfectly, the evil queen might declare war.

Can Carlos and his friends keep the party from turning into a disaster? Who are we kidding? The real question is: After starting a food fight, can they save their kingdom?

Prince Not-So Charming: Happily Ever Laughter is for every kid who worries about how to survive their next party.

Why I like this series:

Prince Not-So Charming is perfect series for middle grade readers (5-9) and for reluctant readers. Packed with fun poop jokes and word puns, Hinuss’ storytelling is quirky, highly entertaining and will tickle reader’s imaginations.

The stories are character driven, with a determined Prince Carlos who will not give up on his dream to be a court jester. He is a loveable prince who only wants to make people laugh and feel happy. He has zero interest in dragon slaying training, rescuing princesses who don’t want to be saved, jousting and attending fancy parties. In fact he’s afraid of heights and quick sand, and hates armor, helmets, swords, hatchets, bows and arrows and daggers. But he does like a good food fight. Prince Carlos has his own weapon — his wit.

Roy L. Hinuss’ hilarious illustrated series encourages kids to be themselves, use their imaginations,  pursue their own interests and conquer their fears and dorkiness. Prince Carlos learns that he’s not alone. There are dragons and princesses who harbor passions of their own and become unlikely friends and allies. And the dragon, Smudge and Princess Pinky, are characters that appear in each new story.

This light-hearted and wacky series will be a hit among young readers. The plots are clever and original  with the right amount of adventure and suspense that will keep kids engaged and turning pages.  Matt Hunt’s pen and ink illustrations contribute to this fun and upbeat story. The colorful and comical covers will surely draw readers to the books. Make sure you read the off-beat interview with Roy L Hinuss at the end of the second book.

Roy L. Hinuss is the authorized biographer of the Charming Royal Family. He is also fond of the occasional fart joke. When he isn’t writing about Prince Carlos Charles Charming’s many adventure in the Faraway Kingdom, he can be found cataloging his collection of celebrity toenail clippings.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Reviewed from purchased copies.

Books for Nourishing Friendship Series by Michael Genhart

Today I am sharing three new children’s titles that are part of Books for Nourishing Friendship Series, by author Michael Genhart and illustrator Steve Mack. They are captivating, funny and carry a powerful message that school children will understand.  They were published by Magination Press on Aug. 7, 2017, just in time for school.  The books are suitable for children ages 4-7 years.

Peanut Butter & Jellyous…sometimes friendships get sticky

Synopsis: Peanut Butter & Jellyous is a playful story about two best friends — Peanut Butter and Jelly. They are always together. When Peanut Butter wants to hang out with other friends, Jelly is very sad and jealous. Peanut Butter encourages Jelly to meet some new friends. They realize that they can explore new friendships with different kids and preserve their own original friendship.  The more friends, the merrier.

Themes: Best Friends, Friendship, Jealousy, Food

Cake & I Scream!…being bossy isn’t sweet

Synopsis: Cake & Ice Cream! is a story about a Cake who likes to spice things up and his best friend, Ice Cream who is cool and tries to get his way by being loud and bossy. When Ice Cream wants something, he wants it right now — even at the expense of knocking over Hot Fudge and demanding Sprinkles come to a party but not Nuts. When Candle gets burned out and leaves in a huff, Ice Cream finds himself sad and alone.  Ice Cream soon learns that screaming at everyone is a fast way to lose friends. Perhaps being bossy isn’t sweet at all!

Themes: Friendship, Ice Cream, Cake, Being Bossy

Mac and Geeeez!…being real is what it’s all about

Synopsis: This is a whimsical story about Mac and Cheese, who are best friends. When they are together, they get along really well. But when Cheese starts cutting up and showing off, he really grates on Mac’s nerves.  Cheese tries too hard to be popular by acting like someone he’s not and in all the wrong ways. Eventually, Cheese realizes he doesn’t have to be the “Big Cheese” and that being his warm self is the best way to be.

Themes: Friendship, Macaroni, Cheese, Getting attention in all the wrong ways

Why I like the Books for  Nourishing Friendship Series:

Michael Genhart’s text is lively, lyrical and will charm young children. He uses fun food word play and a good dose of humor in all three books.

Children will relate to strong and memorable characters that jump off the pages, identify with their friendship problems and learn some learn new strategies for coping. The characters deal with their own issues and do their own problem solving in all three stories — no adults involved.

Steve Mack’s illustrations are bold and colorful and explode off each pages. He captures the priceless expressions of the characters, which will make kids laugh out loud. Children do their own problem solving in all three stories. No adults involved.

Resources: This series will be a winning one with children. They are perfect classroom books for the beginning of a new school year. The three books include a Note to Parents and Educators with information about jealousy, bossy behavior, getting attention in all the wrong ways, and strategies to help guide children to cope and behave while being mindful of others’ feelings.

*The publisher provided me with an advanced reading copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

What Are You So Grumpy About? and What’s With This Room?

After reviewing Cloudette by Tom Lichtenheld this week, I decided to share  some of his other treasures.  

What Are You So Grumpy About?  is written and illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld for children 4-8 years.  Lichtenheld has hit another home run with kids with his bold, detailed and outrageous illustrations.  I have only one word for this book, hilarious!   You only need to read this book once, for kids to get its message.  It will be a favorite for a long time.

There are many reasons for feeling grumpy, and this book is packed with them.   For instance, getting up on the wrong side of the bed and stepping on a pointy toy, someone leaving the toilet seat up, eating grown-up cereal and weird food, too many chores, receiving underpants for your birthday, getting cooties when your sibling touches you, picking up your room, and visiting the most boring museums with your dad.

Lichtenheld cleverly understands what triggers a kid to feel grumpy.  But, he also knows the secret remedy for a grumpy kid.  LAUGHTER!  You can’t be grumpy if you are laughing.  A great book that explores moods.

What’s With This Room? is another funny and engaging book written in verse and illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld.  The illustrations are very detailed, bold and lively.  If your child has a messy room, this book certainly is a must read!  But beware, the mess is so bad you can almost smell it — another sign of  winning book.  Kids will spend time just looking at every detail on each double-page spread and laugh out loud.  The story’s point about cleanliness is clear.

Mom enters her son’s room with hands on her hips and demands to know “what’s with this room and all its clutter and filth?”  So begins the lengthy tug-of war conversation between a mother and her son:  from the piles of clothes,  the moldy food, the stinky runaway shoes, to the smelly monster under the bed that ate a stinky sock and died, and a closet filled with vermin and varmints.  Both Mom and Dad demand to know how his room got in this state of disarray?  And, for every complaint the child has a clever response.  I won’t share the son’s answers or give away the ending, because it is too humorous.   This is a great read for both kids with their parents.