Cowboy Car by Jeanie Franz Ransom

Cowboy Car

Jeanie Franz Ransom, Author

Ovi Nedelcu, Illustrator

Two Lions, Fiction, Apr. 11, 2017

Suitable for Ages: 3-7

Themes: Cars, Pursuing Dreams, Courage, Friendship

Opening: Ever since he was knee-high to his daddy’s hubcaps, Little Car wanted to be a COWBOY.

Synopsis: Little Car grew up in a crowded city garage where he saw cowboys on TV. He learned that cowboys lived in a place called Out West, where there was a lot of space and they could sleep under the stars. Cowboys could wear big hats, drive the range, herd cattle and circle the campfire.  Little Car wanted to be a cowboy. He didn’t want to live in noisy big city.

Everyone told him that cars couldn’t be cowboys. His dad wanted him to be a taxi cab, like him. His mother wanted him to be a family car, like her. One day Little Car packed up his trunk and headed west until he found a big ranch and Dusty, a cowboy. “Cars can’t be cowboys. They can’t ride horses!” Little Car was so convincing, that Dusty gave him a chance. Will Little Car prove he’s got what it takes to be a cowboy?

Why I like this book:

In his heart Little Car knows he’s destined for greater things.  Little Car has character and determination. Kids will cheer for Little Car and his big ambition to pursue his dream of becoming a cowboy.  They will laugh when Dusty asks him to move a big bales of hay and Little Car ends up beneath the pile. But when Dusty is thrown from a mean bull at a rodeo, Little Car struts his stuff with a big VROOOMMM and drives off to help his friend. The ending is endearing.

Jeanie Franz Ransom’s text flows nicely, with fun wordplay (brake dancing) and excellent pacing.  Ovi Nedelcu adds to the excitement of Little Car’s big adventure with his colorful, expressive and zany illustrations, which will quickly draw children into this entertaining story. Wait until kids get a look at Little Car’s fifty-gallon hat! Verdict: This book is a winner!

Resources: Ask children what kind of car/vehicle (truck, boat, golf cart, camper, bus, train etc.) they would like to be. What color would they want to be? Would they have a name?  Would they have an important job like to do like helping people?  Ask kids to draw a picture of the car/vehicle they’ve selected.

Jeanie Franz Ransom was a cowgirl growing up. She had a pony and a showed horses all over the Midwest. She is now an award-winning author. Her recent titles include Big Red and the Little Bitty Wolf and There’s a Cat in Our Class.  I’ve reviewed both books. You can visit Ransom at her website to learn more.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books

There’s a Cat in Our Class! by Jeanie Franz Ransom

There’s a Cat in Our Class!: A Tale About Getting Along

Jeanie Franz Ransom, Author

Bryan Langdo, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Aug. 15, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Themes: Animals, Dogs, Cats, Diversity, Embracing differences, Tolerance

Opening: “There were eighteen students in Miss Biscuit’s class. Until…”

Synopsis: Just before lunch, Miss Biscuit shared the exciting news that there would be a new student joining the classroom — Samantha. Max, Rusty, Ginger, and Tanner assume that their new classmate will be just like them … a  DOG.  But Samantha is a cat! “But cats make me nervous,” Rusty said. Me, too! Ginger said. “I’m going to start shedding any minute.”  How does that make Samantha feel? That leads to some hilarious acting out and a heap of questions among the classmates.  When Samantha saves the ball game at recess, the other dogs thinks she’s a pretty cool cat. Then Miss Biscuit announces that there will be another new student arriving tomorrow…

Why I like this story:

Jeanie Franz Ransom has written a clever and humorous story for young children about embracing the differences in each other. With the growing diversity in our country, this is a very timely book.  The students in this story are curious and brutally honest with their questions to their new classmate, Samantha. They want to know if she eats mice, walks on a leash, wags her tail and uses a litter box or goes outside. The  cast of characters are lively and learn about acceptance, tolerance and how to get along. Bryan Langdo’s illustrations are colorful, expressive and tickle the imagination! I love the book cover.

Reading this book to children will help them discover how they are more alike than different, no matter their skin color, ethnicity, language, LGBT issues or disability.  There’s a Cat in Our Class emphasizes compassion and connectivity with our beautiful diverse human family. Although their lives may vary, children enjoy learning, playing games and sharing feelings of joy and sadness. This book fosters acceptance of others.

Resources: This book includes A Note Readers written by Gayle E. Pitman, PhD, that discusses how parents, teachers, and other adults can talk with children about diversity in a way that’s meaningful and effective.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Big Red and the Little Bitty Wolf by Jeanie Franz Ransom

Big Red 61GdGSYfgnL__SX398_BO1,204,203,200_Big Red and the Little Bitty Wolf: A Story About Bullying

Jeanie Franz Ransom, Author

Jennifer Zivoin, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Feb. 15, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 3-6

Themes: Animals, Wolves, Bullying, Fairy Tale, Courage

Opening: “There was only one path that led from where Little Bitty Wolf lived to where he went to school at Pine Cone Elementary. And that was a problem.”

Synopsis: Little Bitty Wolf has a big problem. He used to love to walk to school until Big Red Riding Hood moves into the neighborhood. Big Red is mean and she loves to tease and terrorize Little Bitty.  She hides behind trees and scares Little Bitty, trips him, pulls his tail and snatches his lunch basket. He tries to ignore her. He stands up to her and tells her to stop, but nothing works. What will he do? Little Bitty talks to his parents and to the school counselor, Mr. Know-It-Owl. He tries something totally unexpected to get Big Red to stop!

Why I like this book:

Jennifer Zivoin has penned a charming twist on the classic story of Little Red Riding Hood. The author turns the story topsy-turvy and Little Bitty Wolf is the target of taunting and bullying by a larger-than-life mean girl, Big Red.  Children will identify with the relentless teasing in this very original fairy tale. Little Bitty Wolf is an adorable  character with heart and determination. Kids will cheer for this little wolf as he attempts to reason and outsmart Big Red in order to get her to stop.  Jennifer Zivoin’s illustrations are richly textured, beautiful, lively and powerful!  The expressions on the faces of Big Red and Little Bitty are priceless. I like the teamwork between the author and illustrator.

Resources:  This is a perfect topic for the beginning of the school year and a way to engage students in a discussion about how they treat each other!  Big Red and the Little Bitty Wolf is an excellent resource for teaching children good emotional techniques and to stand up for what is right. The book includes a Note to Parents and Caregivers about how to spot the common signs that indicate their child is the victim of bullying, witnesses bullying or is the perpetrator of bullying.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.  

Tattling and Squealing at School and at Home

With the beginning of each new school year, teachers across the country deal with tattling.  I found the following books informative, resourceful and just plain fun for kids.  Tattling is normal in young kids.  Pre-school and elementary teachers might want to consider starting off the year reading these books to the classrooms to help their students understand the difference between tattling and telling when something is really important.  Parents also face similar problems with siblings.

A Bad Case of Tattle Tongue, is written by Julia Cook and illustrated by Anita DuFalla for pre-schoolers to third graders.   It is published by the National Center for Youth Issues.  The author must have had my daughter in mind when she wrote this book.  I would have loved to have had this colorful and creative book to use with her.   Cook gets her point across with a wonderful teaching moment that is really quite humorous and guaranteed to make a child stop and think.  Kids alike will be entertained by this book, yet understand its strong message.

Josh tattles so much at school that he has been nicknamed “Josh the Tattler.”  He is so busy worrying about what everyone else is doing that he alienates himself from his classmates.  At school the kids ignore him at lunch time and during recess .   His mother is fed up with his tattling and tells him that if he doesn’t stop tattling, he’s going to get “Tattle Tongue.”   A bad case will cause his tongue turn yellow with purple spots and it will start to itch.   Each time he tattles his tongue will grow longer.  She comes up with a catchy phrase that helps him stop and think at school before he starts to tattle.  But, Josh has a dream about his tongue growing and meets that Tattle Prince who explains to him the difference between tattling and telling, and shares four basic rules.   Josh has some choices to make.

Don’t Squeal Unless It’s a Big Deal, is written by Jeanie Franz Ransom and illustrated by Jackie Urbanovic for pre-schoolers to third graders.  A great message for children accompanied with colorful, expressive pictures emphasizing how exhausting tattling can be for all involved.   There are 19 students in Mrs. McNeal’s class.  And 19 tattletales.  Teacher McNeal does a wonderful job of asking the tattlers if they’ve talked with the accused student, have they been hurt, or have they tried to fix the problem first before coming to her?  She comes up with a new rule that she prints on the blackboard: ” Don’t squeal unless it’s a big deal.”    The piglets learn when it is the proper time to tell a teacher.   Then one afternoon that rule is tested when something BIG happens.  The children are left to their own resources and have to use everything they’ve learned to take care of the problem.  The author is a school counselor and does an outstanding job of showing and not preaching to the students.    She has included a guide for teachers and parents at the end.  Kids will enjoy this book!