My Maddy by Gayle Pitman

Pride Month, June 2020

My Maddy

Gayle Pitman, Author

Violet Tobacco, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, May 25, 2020

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Parent and Child, Gender Diverse Families, Love

Opening: “Most mommies are girls. Most daddies are boys. But lot of parents are neither a boy nor a girl. Like my Maddy.”

Synopsis:

My Maddy has hazel eyes which are not brown or green. And my Maddy likes sporks because they are not quite a spoon or a fork. And she gets up early to watch the sunrise because it’s not day and it’s not night. And she loves rainbows because the most beautiful things happen between the rain and the sun.

Some of the best things in the world are not one thing or the other. They are something in between and entirely their own.

Randall Ehrbar, PsyD, offers an insightful note with more information about parents who are members of gender minority communities, including transgender, gender non-binary, or otherwise gender diverse people.

Why I like this book:

Gayle Pitman has written a celebratory book about parenthood that is both hearwarming and informative. Look at that gorgeous cover filled with an abundance of love, joy and rainbow pride. It is so inspiring, as is the text which is filled with positive images and concepts of one’s family. Violet Tobacco’s illustrations are a vibrant and magical.

Gayle Pitman creates a parent who is blend between Mommy and Daddy, and gives the parent a name inbetween — Maddy. I didn’t realize that Maddy is often times used in some families to describe a parent who is transgender or gender diverse. Pitman subtly portrays an ordinary and loving relationship between the girl and her parent, emphasizing that a parent can be a little bit of both, like many things in nature.

This is a story that many children will be able to relate to, and will be a welcomed addition to any school or public library.

Resources: The Note to Readers is a great resource for parents, teachers and caregivers. It not only includes additional information about gender diverse parents, but also highlights the importance of parents letting their child know through words and actions, that no matter what, they are still the child’s parent. There are tips in discussing gender identity with a child. And the it encourages families to include the children in choosing a new name or nickname for a parent.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
*Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for a review.

Rainbow: A First Book of Pride by Michael Genhart

Rainbow: A First Book of Pride

Michael Genhart, Author

Anne Passchier, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, May 7, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 3-5

Themes: LGBTQ+Pride, Rainbow, Celebration

Opening: “Rainbows. Every color means something.”

Book Synopsis:

This is a sweet ode to rainbow families, and an affirming display of a parent’s love for their child and a child’s love for their parents.

With bright colors and joyful families this book celebrates LGBTQ+ pride and reveals the colorful meaning behind each rainbow stripe.

Readers will celebrate the life, healing, sunlight, nature, harmony, and spirit that the rainbows in this book will bring.

A must-have primer for young readers and a great gift for pride events and throughout the year.

Why I like this book:

I like the simplicity of this book for young children. Readers are introduced to the symbolism behind each stripe in the Pride flag. “Red means life. Orange is healing. Green is nature. Blue is harmony. Violet is spirit. etc.” The book relies on the bold and colorful illustrations to show the story. With each page turn, young readers will see racially diverse children and families and same sex couples celebrating family, life, diversity, acceptance and global pride.  “Be happy. Be love. Be proud.” This is a wonderful addition for pre-school and home libraries. It can’t help but put a smile on your face.

Resources:  What child doesn’t love a rainbow. You can celebrate Gay Pride at home throughout the year by hanging prisms in the windows, placing Pride flags around the house, bringing out the paints and crafts, and baking and icing a Pride cake. Gay Pride month is celebrated every year in June.

Michael Genhart, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice in San Francisco. He is the author of I See You, Ouch!, Moments: When Words Are Used in Hurtful Ways, Peanut Butter & Jellyous, Cake & I Scream!, Mac & Geeez! and So Many Smarts! He lives with his rainbow family in Marin County, California. Visit Genhart at his website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the publisher.