The War I Finally Won by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

The War I Finally Won

Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, Author

Dial Books for Young Readers, Historical Fiction, Oct. 3, 2017

Suitable for ages: 9-12

Themes: Overcoming a disability, WW II, Great Britain, Bombings, Rationing, Family relationships, Prejudice

Book Jacket Synopsis: When 11-year-old Ada’s clubfoot has been fixed at last, and she knows now that she’s not what her mother said she was — damaged and deranged. But soon Ada learns that she’s not a daughter anymore either. Who is she now?

World War II rages on, and Ada and her brother move with their guardian, Susan, into a cottage with the iron-faced Lady Thorton and her daughter. Life in the crowded home is tense. Then Ruth moves in. Ruth a Jewish girl from Germany.  A German? Could Ruth be a spy?

As the fallout from war intensifies, calamity creeps closer, and life during wartime grows even more complicated. Who will Ada decide to be? How can she keep fighting? And who will she struggle to save?

Ada’s first story, The War that Saved My Life, was a #1 New York Times bestseller and won a Newbery Honor, the Schneider Family Book Award, and the Josette Frank Award, in addition to appearing on multiple best-of-the-year lists. The War I Finally Won continues Ada’s journey of family, faith, and identity, showing us that real freedom is not just the ability to choose, but the courage to make the right choice.

Why I like this book:

Fans of The War that Saved My Life, will be thrilled with Bradley’s captivating and satisfying sequel. The setting, the characters, the plot and the imagery are beautifully intertwined and create and extraordinary experience of how WW II changed British family life amidst the blackouts, midnight fire-watching, air raids, bombings, rationing and loss.

The narrative is in Ada’s voice. She is smart and resourceful, strong-willed and spirited, like the horses she trains. Ada continues her journey of triumph over the demons of her past, learns to trust her guardian, Susan, and discovers a new and stronger inner identity.  There are new experiences, things to learn and healing. Her brother Jamie happily accepts Susan as “mum” and all of her affection.

Lady Thorton is aristocratic and an unlikely character who helps Ada face her past. But my favorite relationship is Ada’s interaction with Ruth, a Jewish girl who escapes Germany and moves into the cottage to study higher mathematics with Susan. She faces a lot of discrimination, especially from Lady Thorton and other adults. Ada stands up for Ruth, who ends up playing an important role in the war.

The plot is riveting and full of tension.  Bradley’s pacing will keep readers fully engaged and wondering what will happen next. It is a story that will stay with you because of the depth and the profoundly human characters.

This is an excellent discussion book for teachers to use with middle grade students. The author put a lot of research into this novel, so make sure you read her notes at the end about the historical facts woven into the story. You can learn more at Kimberly Brubaker Bradley’s website.

For the next few months Greg Pattridge will be hosting Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Thank you Greg for keeping MMGM active while author Shannon Messenger is on tour promoting her sixth book, Nightfall, in the Keeper of the Lost Cities series, which will be released November 7.

Personal Effects

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E. M. Kokie

Candlewick Press, Fiction,  Sept. 12, 2012

Suitable for Ages: 14-17

Themes:  War, Deployments, Dealing with Loss, Grief, Redemption

Synopsis:  Matt Foster is drowning in grief after his older brother, T.J., is killed in Iraq.   Matt has a rocky relationship with his father who is stoic and doesn’t know how to deal with his own feelings about T.J.’s death, let alone help Matt with his loss.  Matt has  a minefield of problems like failing classes,  getting into serious fights with kids, and expulsion from school.  When T.J.’s personal items are delivered by the military, his father stashes them away, daring Matt to go near them.   Shauna, his best friend, is the only person Matt confides in.  He fears his bully father, but knows that the only way he can understand what has happened to T.J. is by opening the sealed trunks without getting caught.  Matt finds stacks of letters T.J. has written to Celia Carson and photos.  At the very bottom is a letter sealed in an envelope to “Celia” that T.J. never got to send.  After reading each letter over and over, Matt decides he must travel from Pennsylvania to Wisconsin to deliver the letter and photos to Celia.   Together with Shauna, they plot his trip, calculate the cost, find where Celia lives and her place of employment, and find a cheap place for Matt to stay.  Shauna loans Matt her car.  In searching for answers about his brother in Wisconsin, Matt discovers he doesn’t know T.J. at all.

Why I like this book:  E. M. Kokie has written a courageous and beautiful debut novel that is complicated and compelling.  She delves deeply into the anger, pain, and grief of a 17-year-old trying to make sense of his brother’s death.  Matt wants to know the truth so he can find closure.  It leads him on a journey where he uncovers shocking truths about his brother he never imagined.  What Matt learns challenges him to honor T.J.’s memory, stand up to his volatile father, and take charge of his own life.  In many ways it is also a coming of age book that includes his relationship with Shauna.  There is no tidy ending and this book is as real as it gets.  You won’t easily forget Matt.  It is definitely a book for kids in high school and young adults.   Visit E.M. Kokie at her website and learn more about this author who writes “about teens on the cusp of life-changing moments, exploring issues of identity and self-determination.”

SPOILER ALERT:  Thought it important to include a quote from the author E.M. Kokie: “I think it is important to note that many LGBTQ service members  who served under the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” policy, including over 13,000 military personnel who were discharged.” Matt’s story about how his brother lived a secret life is not uncommon.  Yet, T.J.  was deployed three times, served honorably and was killed in an explosion.  Make sure you read the author’s note at the end of the book.

Never Fall Down – Child Soldiers

Never Fall Down

Patricia McCormick, Author

Balzer & Bray, May 2012, Fiction

Suitable for:  YA Fiction, ages 14 and up

Themes: Child Soldiers, Cambodia History, Courage, Genocide, Khmer Rouge, War

Opening Synopsis:  “When Arn Chorn-Pond was eleven, the Khmer Rouge, a radical Communist regime, came to power in Cambodia, herding the entire population to work camps in the countryside.  Families were separated, and everyone, including children, was forced to work long, grueling hours digging ditches and growing rice…Nearly two million people died — one quarter of the population.  They were buried in mass graves called the Killing Fields.  It is the worst genocide ever inflicted by a country on its own people.”

Patricia McCormick, who is known for taking on complex and tough subjects, has done it again with the story about the genocide that occurred in 1975, when the Khmer Rouge seized control of Cambodia and tortured and killed its own people.  This extraordinary  story about Arn Chorn-Pond, an 11-year-old boy who survived, is true.  The author spent two years with Arn, retracing his life during the three years, eight months and twenty days reign of terror by the Khmer Rouge.  This book is powerful, emotional, horrific, gruesome, and brutal.  It is an important book for young people and adults to learn about this period of history.   Yet, it is an inspirational story of survival, courage, hope and a testimony to human spirit.

Arn is a care-free boy catching frogs with his best friend and selling ice cream with his brother.   One day an army of soldiers dressed in black enter the village and force everyone to the countryside.  His aunt, four sisters and a brother gather a few belongings and food, and join the throngs of people who are walking away from their homes.  Arm works in the rice fields until, the Khmer Rouge separate him from his family and send him to another labor camp.  He watches starving kids die in the rice fields, and he tells himself that he must never fall down.  Arn finds every possible means to survive.

When the soldiers ask if any of the kids can play an instrument, Arn volunteers without knowing a single note.  The Khmer Rouge want to hear revolutionary songs and Arn becomes a very good musician.  He does so to keep himself and other kids alive.  He also learns to dance and entertain which gives him more freedom in the camp and access to more food, which he sneaks to kids.  Arn is taken to the Mango Trees, where he sees the piles of earth and smells the stench of death.  He knows  these Killing Fields  and the Khmer Rouge force him to do unthinkable things.  There is so much death, starvation and brutality, that we see Arn transform over time into an emotionless and numb boy.   As the Vietnamese approach, he is given a gun and used as a child soldier and spy.  He quickly realizes that the Khmer Rouge is using the kids as bait in the jungles.  He is always running, because if he falls down he knows he won’t get up.

Why I like this book:  Patricia McCormick chose to write the book in Arn’s natural speaking voice — broken English.  The story is told in first person making it an even more powerful, convincing, and real.  In Never Fall Down, McCormick gives Arn a voice to speak his truth and share the pain, which he found cathartic and part of his healing process.  He tells his story so people will know first hand what happened.  McCormick is the author of Purple Heart, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2009, and SOLD, a National Book Award finalist.

Today Arn Chorn-Pond has dedicated his life to peace and humanitarian causes around the world.  He founded the Children of War, an organization that aids children held hostage by war and violence.  He is the founder of Cambodian Living Arts, a group that helps preserve the traditional arts of Cambodia by pairing young students with the few master musicians who survived the Khmer Rouge.   He has received the Amnesty International Rights Award, the Reebok Human Rights Award, and the Spirit of Anne Frank Outstanding Citizen Award.  He lives in Cambodia and spends part of his year speaking in the United States.

  

Kristin Hannah Interview – ‘Home Front’

Today, I have the pleasure of interviewing New York Times bestselling author Kristin Hannah, who published her latest novel, Home Front, January 31, 2012, by St. Martens Press.   Her novel spent the first week as #1 on five NYT lists.  Her book is under contract for a movie.  I also will give away one copy of Home Front to a lucky person who leaves a comment by 11:59 p.m. May 9.  I will do a random drawing and announce the winner on  May 10.

Kristin has a surefire hit with her latest gripping novel, Home Front.  She has tackled a harrowing subject about  a wife and mother deployed to war,   For Jolene and Michael Zarkades, there is and emotional toll  on their relationship and family.  Michael,  a criminal defense attorney,  is suddenly thrust into parenting their two daughters,  and creating a stable environment on the home front.  He’s angry at his wife for deploying and never really accepts her military service.  Jolene is a Black Hawk helicopter pilot and duty comes first as she heads to the war zone with her best friend Tami.  There they face the atrocities and trauma of war on the front lines.  Tragedy strikes and the reader is catapulted into a story of  love, loss, heroism in war and at home, honor and hope.

Kristin is a master at developing characters, getting inside their minds and touching their core.  Her writing is powerful and emotive.  Kristin is one of those rare authors who is able to get her story out of your head and into your soul.  You are not reading about characters, you are sharing the experience with them.   Home Front will be a story that will linger with you because of its emotional imprint and realism.

I’ve followed Kristin’s career since she began writing, some 20 novels ago.  We finally met and had dinner last spring.  She graciously agreed to let me interview her about her new book.  Welcome Kristin.  It’s nice to speak again.

What inspired you to write Home Front?

[K]  Quite simply, this story was inspired by the nightly news.  As the war in Iraq went on, I watched the stories — night after night — of soldiers lost in battle, wounded, and the stories of their families left behind, waiting for them to return.  As a mother, I was heartbroken for the men and women and their families.  So many of the young soldiers on the news were the same age as my son, and that hit me really hard.  As an American, I was grateful, and as a woman, I began to wonder what it must be like to go off to war and leave your children behind.  I can’t imagine anything that would be more terrifying and difficult.  I realized that I had never read that story, and I wanted to.  I wanted to explore the idea of a woman torn between love and honor.  So I decided to write it.

I never thought about the potentially controversial nature of the themes in Home Front.  I simply set out to write a story about a female mother and soldier who went to war.  Although Michael is fairly anti-military and anti-war, the book is ultimately less political and more personal.  I didn’t set out to take a stance on the war itself.  This was really about supporting and  understanding the troops and realizing the extent of the sacrifices they make.

How do you feel about your book and how would your rate it?

[K] That’s a great question!  Honestly, I am usually the harshest critic of my own work.  Although I work as hard as I can on every book, there are simply some that I end up liking better than others and a few –a very few–that I fall in love with.  Home Front is one of those rare and special books that really ended up better than I imagined it would be.  I’m quite proud of it.  I think that’s because the characters are so real and three-dimensional and the issues raised are so important.  It is a book that comes at a great time.  As Americans, we need to remember to be grateful to and supportive of our troops and their families.

What do you want people to take away from Home Front?

[K]  At is core, Home Front is a novel about two ordinary people who have lost their way over twelve years of marriage and then find themselves separated.  I think this is a story we can all relate to.  You don’t have to be a soldier or even know a soldier to relate to the powerful emotional themes in the book.  We can all imagine how it felt for Jolene to hear her husband say, “I don’t love you anymore,” and we can understand how lost Michael felt after the death of his father.  A marriage is a tricky thing that hangs on hooks both big and small.  Every little thing can matter.  Words spoken and unspoken carry a tremendous weight, and in a way it requires as much commitment and honor to hold a marriage together as to go off to war.  In that way, we all understand sacrifice.  It’s no surprise that I’m a romantic, and to me, there’s nothing more romantic than a husband and wife falling back in love with each other.

That’s what I want people to see in the end–the story of an ordinary marriage tested in an extraordinary way.  And, of course, I hope readers end up with a slightly better understanding of and appreciation for the sacrifices made by our military families.

How much research was involved in writing Home Front?  Did you have contact with the military?

[K]  The research for Home Front almost killed me. 🙂  I didn’t anticipate that would be the case, either.  I was actually fairly cavalier about this particular aspect.  I mean, I’m a lawyer, so research is something I’m comfortable with, and additionally, I have tackled breast cancer, brain tumors, the Siege of Leningrad, and World War II Russia, and DNA testing to exonerate convicted prisoners.  I didn’t think that the themes and issues in Home Front would require any more research than I was used to.  I couldn’t have been more wrong.  Researching and writing Home Front, with its military theme, was a mammoth undertaking.  I was a bit like Alice, falling down the rabbit hole, into a world where nothing was the way I imagined it.  I was incredibly lucky to work with CW5 Teresa Burgess, a Black Hawk pilot/wife/mother who was a real lifesaver in the research and understanding department.

Prior to Home Front, I would have said that I understood something about military families–their lives and their service.  But, I was wrong in almost everything.  I only understood the thinnest layer.  I learned so much in the writing of this novel and in researching it.  I went to a deployment ceremony and honestly, I think every American should attend one.  Watching our soldiers preparing to go off to war, and their families standing alongside to say goodbye, really brings their sacrifice into sharp focus.  It is a powerful reminder that whatever one feels about any particular war, we need to always respect and honor our soldiers and their families.   Honestly, I felt a little ashamed that I hadn’t attended one before.  Although, boy, was it difficult.  I was humbled by their pride and strength  in the face of such an undertaking.  It makes you truly consider what heroism is and reminds you to be grateful.

Did you find that the experience of a woman deployed different from a man being deployed?

[K]  Yes, I think  it’s very different, and those differences were important to me.  As you know, I write about women’s issues and women’s lives, so I guess it’s not surprising that I came to this topic.  I can’t imagine how difficult it must be for a mother/soldier to leave her children and go off to war.

The parallel story of Michael defending a soldier with PTSD in a criminal case, while Jolene was dealing with PTSD, was brilliant!  Did you have that in mind from the start?

[K]  Thanks!  That was a really lucky stroke, coming up with that.   And yes, it existed almost from the beginning (at least from the time Michael existed).  I came up with it because I wanted to educate the reader–and by extension, Michael–about PTSD without having to worry about being author intrusive or boring.  The depiction of PTSD is one of the most important and relevant portions of the book.  I tried to really bring it home in a way that allowed readers to understand how it feels to suffer the symptoms.  I also tried to inform–this was the point of the Keller trial.  The reader learns the truth of PTSD along with Michael.  ultimately, one of the points of the novel is a reminder to all of us.  As a nation we have to care for our soldiers upon their return.  It’s just that simple.

What is your writing process?

[K]  My writing process is extremely burdensome and time-consuming.  I have spent years trying to pare it down, to be “smarter” from the beginning, and none of it seems to work for me.  No matter how much research I do, I never seem to quite nail the right story from the start.  Nonetheless, I begin with either a theme or an issue.  In the case of Home Front, it was an issue.  I wanted to write a story about the price of deployment on a wife/soldier/mother.  We have all read about ment going off to war and women staying on the home front; I wanted to turn the story on its head and make it about a woman.  That idea obviously leads to dozens of potential story lines.  It began as a story about sisters, then about an estranged father/daughter, and ultimately became about Jolene and Michael’s crumbling marriage and their frightened children.  As you know, I write longhand–often sitting on the beach.  Then my fabulous assistant, Kim,  types up my pages and hands them to me.  It is normal for me to do as many as twenty drafts.  Half of those drafts are game changers–characters, settings, storylines will be changed–and half are more line edit.  It takes me about four months to research, outline and conceive the idea; six months to write the “first” draft; and another five months of editing after that.

How has social media effected you as a writer?

[K]  Early in my writing career, I was isolated and didn’t know what people thought about my books.  I was dragged into the new world of social media kicking and screaming, but the surprising truth is that I like talking to my readers via Facebook and my blog.  (Kristin has a FB following of over 64,000.)  It’s amazing, isn’t it?  And they’re so fun!

After 20 novels, you’ve been approached by the film industry about two of your books?

Yes, Chris Columbus, who is one my favorite director/producers has begun work on Home Front.  I can’t wait to see what he does with it.   He’s such a genius at mixing drama and emotion.  Also, Abigail Breslin, the Oscar-nominated star of Little Miss Sunshine, has optioned The things We Do for Love.   That’s a real reader favorite, so I have high hopes for it.

Any tiny hints about your 2013 novel — inquiring minds will want to know?

[K] LOL!  Nice try.  It’s changing every second, so we’ll see.

Great talking with you again, Patricia!  Thanks so much.

Kristin, thank you for taking time out of your crazy-busy schedule to talk with me about Home Front and all the exciting news you had to share.  Home Front is a powerful novel, and has all the right ingredients to make a compelling movie.  What a great new experience for you.   We will all be standing in line at the theaters when the movies are released!  Best of luck! 

Readers:  Don’t forget to leave a comment, if you want a chance to win a copy of Home Front!  During May, I will be reviewing  books for military families, children,  and veterans.   I also will share information about support programs for families who have lost loved ones.

 

The Librarian of Basra: A True Story from Iraq

The Librarian of Basra: A True Story from Iraq

Jeanette Winter, Author and Illustrator

Harcourt, Inc., Juvenile Literature, 2005

Suitable for:  Grades 2-5

Themes:  Libraries, Saving books, War, Middle East

Opening/Synopsis:  “Alia Muhammad Baker is the librarian of Basra, a port city in the sand-swept country of Iraq.  Her library is a meeting place for all who love books.  They discuss matters of the world and matters of the spirit.  Until now — now, they talk only of war. ”   Alia is worried about the approaching war.  She asks the governor to move the 30,000 books to a safe place, but he refuses.  This feisty and spirited librarian takes matters into her own hands and secretly brings books home every night.  When war turns Basra into a burning city, she begs shopkeepers and friends to help her hide the books before it’s too late.   As the fires burn out, the library is gone.  Alia waits and waits for the war to end.  She dreams of a new library.

Why I liked this book:  This is a true story based on the heroic efforts of a woman who is passionate about saving her town’s precious books.   Jeanette Winter’s text is simple and straightforward.  It is a non-threatening way to present war to children.  It also teaches children that people have the same passions and love of reading worldwide.  Thus driving home the theme, we really are all the same no matter where we live.  The book is beautifully illustrated in acrylics.  Winter’s simple colorful illustrations evoke the emotions of war  and hope for the future.

Activities:   There is a note from the author at the end of the book that gives history about Alia and the invasion of Iraq in 2003.   A New York Times reporter heard about the story and brought it to the world’s attention on July 27, 2003.  This is a good discussion book to introduce children to war as the story is not frightening.   Kids have seen the images of war on TV.  It is also a book about how one person can make a difference.  Listen to what they think and feel about war.  Discuss with children how people all over the world love to read just like they do.  Talk about ordinary heroes like Alia, and ask kids to share stories about local heroes.  Get children involved in donating some off their own books to local literacy programs.  You can read a Harcourt interview with Jeanette Winter and see  photos of Jeanette with Alia.

To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.  Or click on the Perfect Picture Book Fridays  badge in the right sidebar.

Playing War – Perfect Picture Book

Playing War

Kathy Beckwith, Author

Lea Lyon, Illustrator

Tilbury House Publishers, 2005, Fiction

Suitable for:  Grades 2-5

Themes: Games, Children playing war,  Real loss and Friendship

Opening/ Synopsis:  “Too hot for basketball,” Luke said.  “Let’s do something else…”I know said Jeff.  “Let’s play war!”  Luke stood up.  “Good idea!”  “What about riding bikes?” asked Jen.  “No,” Jeff replied.  “War’s the best!  We haven’t played it for a while.”   A group of five friends decide one summer day to play a game of war outside.   Luke draws a line in the dirt and writes an S for soldiers on one side, and an E for enemies on the other side.  They divide into teams.  Jen explains the rules to Sameer, who is new to the neighborhood.   Grabbing sticks for guns, and pinecones for bombs and grenades, Luke and Sameer take off as the enemies.  As the game gets underway, Sameer decides he doesn’t want to play and goes home.  The five friends gather to play war again the next day.  Sameer again doesn’t want to play.  He tells his friends that he has been in a REAL war, but they don’t believe him.  Then Sameer explains that he was at school one day when his house was blown up and his family was killed.  The kids are speechless.   As the friends listen to Sameer’s story, they make a very important decision that day.  This is a great book for the school library.

Why I like this book:  I love this book for many reasons.  Today children are exposed to the violence of war on TV and in movies.  They have  family members deployed or they know of a soldier who has been killed in a war.  Playing War gives parents an opportunity to read the book aloud with their kids,  talk about what is happening in the world, and discuss whether it is a good idea to make a game of war.  I like that the author, Kathy Beckwith, didn’t include adults in this story.  Her characters make their own decisions about whether or not to continue their game.  This is a very powerful story written in very gentle and compassionate way so that kids can learn from each other.   Lea Lyon’s beautiful and expressive watercolor illustrations support the emotion of the story.

Resources:  Check out the Reach and Teach website for activities, resources and teacher’s notes that Tilbury House Publishers created for Playing War.   Additional reading materials for parents:  Diane Levin, Ph.D.,  is the author of two books Teaching Young Children in Violent Times and The War Play Dilemma.

Note: On March 4, I reviewed a YA book,  Abe in Arms, about a child soldier, who suffers flashbacks about his life in war-torn Africa.  I accidentally released the book on Sunday, so many missed it.  It is a very powerful story and I hope you check it out.

To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.  Or click on the Perfect Picture Book Fridays  badge in the right sidebar.

Abe in Arms – Child Soldiers

Abe in Arms

Pegi Deitz Shea

PM Press (Reach and Teach), 2010,  YA Fiction

Suitable for:  Ages 12 and up

Themes: Child Soldiers, War, PTSD, Courage and Hope

Opening/Synopsis:  “What’s your name boy?  He stares into the mirrored sunglasses.  Words don’t come out.  I’ll tell you mine, then you tell me yours.  What’s behind those mirrors?  All he can see is himself.  What’s inside the camouflage uniform?  My name is Grant.  See, it’s easy.  Now tell me yours.  He finds a voice.  It comes out:  James.”  Abe in Arms is a gripping novel about a teen who has survived the war in Liberia, escaped the rebel army,  is adopted by an American doctor and his loving family.  Abe may have survived the war and started a new life, but his scars are so deep that his senior year begins to unravel as he deals with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  This is a story you will not easily forget, or want to forget.   It evokes a powerful response within you.

Abe is a high school senior on his ways to a Division 1 Track scholarship.   He is an honor student, has a girlfriend and has developed a close relationship with his brother, Niko, and parents.  Abe is at a track meet at the starting line with the other runners when he hears the gun “BANG.”  Abe leaps forward, but is suddenly  transported to another place and time where he hears the BANG of rebels guns shooting randomly at people in his village.  He has collapsed at the starting line and is curled in a fetal position.  His coach is shouting his name.   Abe is rushed to the hospital.  Over the following months, Abe suffers disabling flashbacks and seizures as he relives the events of his young life in war-torn Liberia, where he loses his mother and sister.  At home, his brother Niko, observes his flashbacks at night and his explosive temper over silly things.  At school he is zoning out in classes.  He fights with another runner and knocks out his teeth.  He distances himself from his girlfriend.  His father, Dr George Elders, recognizes Abe is in trouble and has him work with a therapist who specializes in PTSD.  Abe journeys into a dark world where he has suppressed his memories.  He finds himself facing the demons of his past life as a boy soldier — something he wants to bury.  This action-packed novel is full of suspense, twists and turns, surprises and hope.

Why I like this book:   Pegi Deitz Shea has written a powerful book for teens about young boys forced to become soldiers in war-torn countries like Africa.  She isn’t afraid to take her readers to complicated and uncomfortable places.  These boy soldiers suffer unimaginable violence and are made to do things by rebel armies that are horrific.  They are robbed of their childhoods.  How will those who survive, ever live normal lives?  Abe in Arms is just one shocking story about a teen coming to grips with his past.  Fortunately, Abe is grounded by the support and love of  his family who long to see him heal.  Click here on the Reach and Teach  resource link for Abe in Arms.  This site has information from Amnesty International, resources, lessons plans, ways to get involved and a very moving video about a boy soldier.  Published reports estimate that there are approximately 250,000 children enslaved as soldiers around the world.

Pegi Deitz Shea is an award-winning children’s author, who has brought the worlds of refugees, immigrants, child laborers and historical figures into the minds of readers of all ages through books that include The Whispering Cloth, Tangled Threads, Ten Mice for Tet, The Carpet Boy’s Gift, Patience Wright, and Noah Webster: Weaver of Words.