Our Future: How Kids are Taking Action by Janet Wilson

Multicultural Children’s Book Day, Jan. 31, 2020

#ReadYourWorld

Our Future: How Kids are Taking Action

Janet Wilson, Author and Illustrator

Second Story Press, Nonfiction, Sep. 10, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes: Child Activists, Making a Difference, Climate Action, Cyberbullying, Gun Violence, Social Justice

Opening: “As anyone will admit, listening to the news can be scary — hurricanes, school shootings, forest fires, wars. What are we to make of a world that seems ever more troubled and fragile?… And so kids are taking action, rising to question the sanity of common practices.” 

Book Synopsis:

From climate action to cyberbullying, from gun violence to animal protection, these young activists have brought about real change.

Young people from across the globe are raising awareness about what issues matter to them most and working to protect the future of the worlds we all share.

American Jaelun Parkerson kneels with his football teammates during the national anthem to protest racial injustice, Canadian Autumn Peltier spoke in front of the United Nations to raise awareness about water pollution; and Tiassa Mutunkei from Kenya started a club for young people to stop elephants from being killed for their ivory tusks. All of them are making a difference for the future of our plaent — and you can too!

Why I like this book:

Janet Wilson writes empowering and timely nonfiction books about ordinary young people who see injustice around them and take action  — no matter how small or large — and make a contribution in their communities, countries and world.

Wilson’s books are my favorite kind of books to share because there is an urgency in our world and kids are concerned that adults aren’t doing enough. We hear it in the plea from 15-year-old Greta Thunberg of Sweden who is leading worldwide protests for climate change and speaking before the United Nations because she feels leaders are failing her generation. Meet Melati and Isabel Wijsen of Indonesia, who saw firsthand the negative impacts of plastic pollution and petitioned their government to ban plastic bags in Bali.

These children and teens are bold and brave and are working for the rights of children in a peaceful way.  Wilson captures their engaging stories in a double-page spread which features a warm and beautifully painted illustration of the featured child on the left and text and photographs about the child’s contribution on the right, along with a colorful sidebar of other kids doing similar projects globally. Read their stories and you will be inspired! This multiculatural book belongs in school libraries.

Resources: The book is a resource. At the end there is a section for students on “What YOUth Can Do,” that will spark many lively discussions and encourage kids to think about what they may do alone or together to make the world a better place. What will you do? Visit Janet Wilson at her website.

Quote:

“Young people are a part of the largest generation in history — two billion strong. Around the globe young people are coming together to build a movement for success…Yes we face a lot of big problems, but we can start fixing them through a lot of small actions…If each one of you takes action, you will create a wave of action like this world has never, ever seen. Be a part of two billion acts for good. Because, step by step, little by little, we will get to a better world. Together let’s get the job done.” Amina Mohammed, UN Deputy Secretary-General

Janet Wilson is an artist and author of many picture books on child activism including  Our Earth: How Kids are Saving the Planet, and Our Rights: How Kids are Changing the World, and Our Heroes: How Kids are Making a Difference, which are popular with educators and students. She also wrote Shannen and the Dream for a School and Severn and the Day She Silenced the World.  Winter’s books  have won many awards.

Greg Pattridge hosts Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Check out the link to see all of the wonderful reviews by KidLit bloggers and authors.

*Review copy provided by publisher.

Words Wound: Delete Cyberbullying and Make Kindness Go Viral

WordsWound9781575424514_p0_v2_s260x420Words Wound: Delete Cyberbullying and Make Kindness Go Viral

Justin W. Patchin, Ph.D, and Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D., Authors

Free Spirit Publishing, Nonfiction, Dec. 3, 2013

Suitable for Ages: 13-17

Themes: Cyberbullying, Bullying, Computer crimes, Internet and teenagers, Prevention, Kindness

Publisher Synopsis: Cyberbullying among teens happens every day. Vicious messages and damaging photos exchanged through texts, email, and social media can lead to humiliation, broken friendships, punishment at school, and–as recent headlines prove–legal prosecution and even suicide. Faced with this pandemic problem, concerned parents, educators, and young people across the country are looking for information and advice.  Words Wound  is written especially for tweens and teens on the importance of standing up for themselves and others online.

Why I like this book: Justin W. Patchin, Ph.D., and Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D., are cyberbullying experts who have written a practical and valuable handbook for teens. Both authors know from personal experience what it feels like to be bullied at school. They have researched and talked with thousands of teens at schools, libraries and youth centers about their experiences with bullying. They’ve spoken with parents who have lost children to suicide. Words Wound is very easy to use. It is divided into three parts all supported with real-life stories and strategies for preventing, reducing and combatting cyberbulling at school. Teens are taught ways to be kind, respectful and stand up for friends. And, they are encouraged to be advocates for change in their schools and communities. What I like about this user-friendly guide is you can choose the chapters that interest you, or you can read it from beginning to end. It is a “must-have companion” for any kid with social media access. This book is a valuable resource for parents, educators and administrators. The authors wrote the book because they“know what a school without bullying looks like.” They have visited many schools across the country that are bully free because of students and educators working together.

Resources: The authors run the Cyberbullying Research Center and have designed a website, Words Wound, specifically for teens. It is a place where teens can go to keep up with the conversation, ask questions, express worries, share thoughts, ideas, and strategies about what has worked for them personally and in their schools. The authors want to hear from you. They want teens and young adults to join the national discussion to make schools a safe place.