When Penny Met POTUS by Rachel Ruiz

When Penny Met POTUS 51Q6dLkRC5L__SX409_BO1,204,203,200_When Penny Met POTUS

Rachel Ruiz, Author

Melissa Manwill, Illustrator

Capstone Young Readers, Fiction, July 1, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 4-9

Themes: Going to work with mother, POTUS, White House, Political Season, Imagination

Opening:”Penny jumps out of bed extra early, even though she doesn’t have school today. Why? Because today she gets to go to work with her mom!”  

Synopsis: Penny’s mother works in a big white house for a boss called POTUS.  She thinks it is a funny name (POE-TUS), but she can’t imagine what he may look like. She imagines a blue, superhero monster, because after all he has his own secret service agents. She hopes she gets to meet POTUS and practices how to bow and what to say.  She imagines they may even have a tea party together. Once she arrives at her mom’s office, she’s impatient to meet POTUS and sneaks off to find this mysterious creature. Will she be disappointed or surprised with her discovery?

Why I like this book:

The timing is perfect for the release of Rachel Ruiz’s imaginative, entertaining, and very informative book that will introduce young children to the President, the job and the election year. It is a clever and animated story about Penny, an imaginative and curious brown-skinned girl, wondering what her mother does at work every day in a big white house with someone important named POTUS. When Penny finally tracks down the president and discovers POTUS is not a blue monster, her expressions are priceless! You sense some disappointment, until the POTUS invites Penny to visit the kitchen. There are other surprises that I won’t spoil.  The ending is humorous and satisfying.

Melissa Manwill’s illustrations are large, bold, lively and colorful. They significantly contribute to Penny’s larger-than-life imagination of what is a POTUS. I also enjoyed Manwill’s depiction of diversity among the White House staff.

Ruiz was inspired to write her picture book after spending most of 2012 working on President Obama’s re-election campaign. “After long days at the office, I would rush home to my inquisitive three-year-old daughter, who often showered me with questions like, ‘Did you see the President today? What did he have for lunch? Is he allergic to peanut butter?’ and on and on,” said Ruiz. “When my daughter met President Obama at a campaign rally the weekend before the election, the brief but oh-so-memorable exchange between POTUS and the 3-year-old was the exact moment when the idea for this book took hold.”

Resources: Check out this delightful video about kids thoughts on who and what is a POTUS! It will inspire discussions and activities for you to do with your children. You might add FLOTUS, VPOTUS, and SCOTUS to the list of political acronyms.  This is a great book to pair with President Squid by Aaron Reynolds and Diana’s White House Garden, by Elisa Carbone.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Peddles by Elizabeth Rose Stanton

Peddles 41x-wf3oC-L__SY497_BO1,204,203,200_Peddles

Elizabeth Rose Stanton, Author and Illustrator

Paula Wiseman Books/ Simon & Schuster, Fiction, Jan. 6, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Pigs, Barnyard animals, Dreams, Dancing, Friendship, Humor

Opening: “Peddles was just a pig. He lived on a farm with the other pigs, doing the usual pig things: eating and sleeping and oinking and rooting and wallowing and…”

Synopsis: Unlike the other barnyard pigs, Peddles sees life differently. He thinks about eating pizza, soaking in a bath tub, sitting on a toilet and going into space. The other pigs tease him, but Peddles’ dreams even bigger. One night he hears a joyous sound coming from the barn and watches humans stomping and twirling. He wants to dance. When he finds a pair of red boots in a bag of shoes, he tries them on, stands up, falls over on his back  and can’t get up. His friends step in and give him a nudge.

Why I like this book:

Elizabeth Rose Stanton has written a playful and adorable story about Peddles, a pig with big dreams. Peddles will charm you from the first to the last page. What child would not giggle at the sight of pig poop! And look at that cover!

This is a humorous story about self-discovery and friendship. Children will cheer for Peddles for his big ideas and seeing a life for its possibilities. They will ache when he falls down on his back and they will smile when his friends nudge him forward. Children will identify with Peddles and laugh at the unexpected ending. The text is spare with humorous and expressive illustrations that will melt your heart. This is a wonderful example of how Stanton’s colored-pencil and watercolor illustrations really show the story.

Elizabeth Rose Stanton is the author of Henny, a rollicking story about a chicken with arms. Visit Stanton at her website.

This is Sadie

This is Sadie9781770495326_p0_v1_s192x300This is Sadie

Sara O’Leary, Author

Julie Morstad, Illustrator

Tundra Books, Fiction, May 12, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 3-7

Themes: Imagination, Inspiration, Creativity

Opening: This is Sadie. No, not that. That’s a box. Sadie is inside the box. Wait, do you hear? Sadie says she’s not inside the box at all. “I’m on an enormous boat,” she says, “crossing a wide, wide sea.”

Synopsis: Sadie has a huge imagination. The days are not long enough for Sadie because she has so many things to make, do and be.  She likes to make boats of boxes. She chats with birds, builds things, and has wings that can fly her anywhere. She has been a boy raised by wolves, lived under the sea, and been the hero in fairy tales. Sadie likes stories best because she can make them from nothing at all.

Why I like this story:

Sara O’Leary has written an endearing story that encourages girls to try everything and be who ever they want to be. Sadie is irresistible. Her story is rich in imagination and will inspire many little girls to find their own “Sadie” within. I also appreciate that many of Sadie’s adventures and undertakings are non-gender specific. How fun would it be to build a contraption with a hammer and nails or be a boy raised by wolves? If you begin to think like Sadie, the possibilities are endless. And being yourself is pretty special.

The text is sparse, encouraging children to think outside the box. I am always drawn to books that inspire and celebrate a child’s imagination — especially when so many kids are plugged into gadgets. Julie Morstad’s illustrations are lush and magical. They beautifully capture Sadie’s story.

Resources: Give your child several big empty boxes to play with. Fill other boxes with non-gender specific dress-up clothing, toys and art supplies. Many of Sadie’s adventures may be related to her reading stories like the Little Mermaid, Alice in Wonderland, and Jungle Book. Teachers and parents can use these books to jump-start a discussion about favorite stories and characters.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Billy’s Booger

billys-booger-9781442473515Billy’s Booger: A Memoir (sorta)

William Joyce (and his younger self) Author and Illustrator

Athenum Books for Young Readers, Fiction, Jun. 2, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 5-9

Themes: Imagination, Books and reading, Authorship, Memoir, School, Contest

Opening:Once upon a time, when TV was in black and white, and there were only three channels, and when kids didn’t have playdates — they just roamed free in the “out-of-doors” — there lived a kid named Billy.”

Synopsis: Billy has a huge imagination and thinks about class rooms in tree houses, gravity shoes, jet packs and automatic page turners. He likes to draw on his math tests and homework, read comic books, study the newspaper “funnies,” watch monster movies and invents his own sports. His teacher and principal find Billy the most challenging student — ever. The librarian announces a contest to see which student can create the best book. Billy is excited and researches, writes and illustrates his masterpiece. He is living his dream! Perhaps this will be Billy’s chance to show his talent.

Why I like this book:

This inspiring and highly entertaining picture book is about the young William (Billy) Joyce. Readers are given a peek at the man Billy will someday be. Joyce’s richly painted and expressive illustrations give readers a sense of life in the 1960s.

This book is about Billy’s childhood.  Children will fall in love with Billy’s overactive imagination, unconventional antics and his determination to march to his own drum beat. It is also a story about Billy’s first attempts to write his first book, Billy’s Booger: The Memoir of a Little Green Nose Buddy. Who would have ever thought that his journey as an author would begin with a quirky book about a booger.

The original fourth grade book is inserted inside the book on manila paper. Billy’s story is packed with spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors which adds a certain charm to reading about the super booger that gives Billy amazing super powers in math. Children are going to cheer Billy’s wacky imagination and pour over the details of his book.

Joyce’s book carries a very strong message for children not to give up on their dreams and be true to themselves. It also emphasizes that not everyone will like your work (especially teachers and librarians,) but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t an audience out there. There’s a great ending to this story, but you’ll have to read the book to find out.

Resources: Parents and teachers check out the suggestions and Activity Sheets for using Billy’s Booger in the classroom. I’d love to see this book in every school library.  I hope teachers and librarians use Joyce’s book in their lesson plans to encourage students to write a book about anything that inspires them. What a wonderful way to encourage children to dream big.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

I Am Yoga by Susan Verde and Peter H. Reynolds

September is National Yoga Month

i-am-yoga-coverI Am Yoga

Susan Verde, Author

Peter H. Reynolds, Illustrator

Abrams Books for Young Readers, Fiction, Sep. 8, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 3-9

Themes: Yoga, Children, Yoga poses, Quiet Mind, Relaxation, Imagination. Creativity

Opening: “When I feel small in a world so big, I calm my mind, my body, my breath. I can create and imagine. I am Yoga.”

Book Jacket Synopsis: An eagle soaring among the clouds or a star twinkling in the night sky…a camel in the desert or a boat sailing across the sea. Yoga has the power of transformation. Not only does it strengthen bodies and calm minds, with a little imagination it can show us that anything is possible.

Why I like I Am Yoga:

I Am Yoga is another home run for the creative team of Susan Verde and Peter H. Reynolds. Verde’s text is sparse, lyrical and creative. You feel peaceful reading the story about a young girl trying to cope with a world that is spinning around her. She is busy with school, homework, sports, music lessons and household chores. Through yoga she learns to close her eyes, quiet her mind, and focus on her breathing. Reynolds’ expressive and soothing watercolors compliment the story. He gracefully captures the girl practicing the 16 yoga poses as she imagines herself in nature standing tall as the trees, soaring among the clouds, dancing with the moon, and opening like a flower.

I am drawn to Verde’s beautiful story because I believe in the benefits of teaching yoga and mindfulness to young children. If children learn a yoga practice early in their developing years, it becomes a natural part of a who they are. It teaches them tools that bring balance into their busy lives. They learn to recognize stress and use well-known practices to still, calm and relax their bodies, thoughts and emotions. Yoga will benefit children for a lifetime and help them change their world…the world.

Resources: There is a kid-friendly guide at the end of the book that features 16 yoga poses to strengthen, calm and inspire children to live happier and healthier lifestyles. Each pose includes instructions. This is a terrific practice for both children and parents to do together. Since September is National Yoga Month, many yoga studios, teachers and recreational centers are offering free yoga classes and events in their communities.

Susan Verde and Peter H. Reynolds will officially launch  I Am Yoga, Saturday, September 19 at 11 a.m. Join the celebration, which will be held at The Blue Bunny, in Dedham, MA.  They have collaborated on two other books, The Museum and You and Me. Visit their websites.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Happy International Dot Day!

dot_day_2012_v01Today is the 12th anniversary of Peter H. Reynold’s international bestselling book, The Dot, about a girl who doesn’t think she can draw.

It is also the seventh annual celebration of International Dot Day. Over 3,910,952 students from 115 countries will be participating. It will be a fun week for children worldwide to read The Dot in 12 different languages and braille, sing the Dot Song, use their imagination to make their unique and creative dots, and share their masterpieces. Many classrooms have signed up to SKYPE  and connect with each other in the U.S. and around the world.

Authors have created Celebri-Dots. KidLit bloggers are making their marks today and all week. Please remember to post your dots on your websites, Facebook and Twitter using @DotClubConnect, #dotday and #makeyourmark.

I have included a few of the dots I’ve created over the years.


Dot Day20150907_151552

Copyright 2015 Patricia Tilton

Nicole and tireCAM00400

Copyright 2013 Patricia Tilton

Remember to have fun today and this week of celebration of imagination, creativity connecting with our global friends. I’m still hoping for many more KidLit bloggers sharing their dots.

Not Every Princess

Not Every Princess9781433816482_p0_v1_s260x420Not Every Princess

Jeffrey Bone and Lisa Bone, Authors

Valeria Docampo, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, May 1, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Encouraging kids to imagine and pursue dreams, Gender roles, Stereotypes, Individuality

Opening: “Not every princess lives in a castle. Not every fairy has wings. Not every pirate sails a ship.”

Book Jacket Synopsis: Who do you want to be: a princess? Pirate? Teacher or scientist? And where would you like to play: a castle? Pirate ship? Library or spacelab? It’s  your decision to make, so think away. Your imagination and thoughts can create pictures and scenes, the most beautiful, amazing picturesque dreams!

Why I like this book: Jeffrey and Lisa Bone encourage children to think outside of the box, use their imaginations  and envision lives for themselves beyond stereotypical gender roles and expectations. The rhyming text is purposely simple and shows ways children can be princesses, pirates, ballerinas, superheroes, knights and mermaids in fun and less traditional and stereotypical ways.  For example, “Not every Princess lives in a castle,” shows a girl wearing a viking helmet and perched high in a tree house.  “Not every pirate sails ships,” shows a boy with a patch over his eye and a bandanna around his head clinging to  a kite tail and sailing among the birds. Valeria Docampo’s colorful illustrations are whimsical, magical and playful. Her artwork complements the story so the book is a fun read and doesn’t come across as a resource.

Resources: There is a Note to Parents and Caregivers filled with useful advice and strategies to help children imagine that they can be engineers, pilots, football/basketball/baseball players, dancers, doctors, and scientists no matter whether they are male or female. The authors, who are both psychologists, suggest some very creative activities to use with children.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.