The Little Lamp by Dave Dellecese

The Little Lamp

Dave Dellecese, Author

Ada Konewki, Illustrator

Dandy Press, Fiction, Feb. 12, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 4-7

Themes: Lamp, Love, Purpose, Obsolete, Resilience, Re-purpose, Rhyme

Opening: In a tiny brick apartment, / at Jasper Drive and Main, / Lived the custest little couple / Known as Jack and Jane McShane.

Synopsis:

Little Lamp shines his light on the Jane and Jack McShane. A gift from Gramma, it always sits on a table while they read books in the evening and sip their tea. When they have their first child, Little Lamp is beside them as they play and read books to Baby.  At night time he watches the baby sleep. Little Lamp is very happy.

Then one day Jack McShane brings home a big, shiny lamp. Little Lamp is sad when he’s taken to the cold basement and set on a top shelf next to cans of paint and old boxes. Years later, the McShanes clean the house and set Little Lamp out with the trash. He begins to doubt himself and doesn’t feel very useful. Then he hears the rumble of the garbage truck. What will be Little Lamp’s fate?

Why I like this book:

Dave Dellecese has written a heartwarming story about a little lamp that manages to deal with change in its life and still find purpose no matter the challenges. There are many teachable moments for children to learn about disappointment, doubt, change, self-worth, hope and optimism — all presented in the tale of Little Lamp.

Dellecese uses clever rhyming and word play to emphasize his main theme to children, “Everyone has a purpose.” The characters are memorable, and Little Lamp is so expressive and adorable.

Ada Konewki’s bold illustrations are expressive, charming and compliment Little Lamp’s story. The art is happy and colorful when it needs to be, and a bit somber when Little Lamp’s fate is unknown.

Resources:  Purpose is a big word for children.  Parents and educators may want to first focus on what matters most to a child. Help them think about their own best qualities. Ask questions about whether they have a good relationships with their family and friends. Do they care about others? Do they remember a time when they have made a difference? Have they made someone’s day brighter with a hug or a fist full of flowers? Do they offer to help an elderly neighbor by walking their dog? These simple questions will help kids think about how they may make their own contribution to the world.

Dave Dellecese writes a variety of books and comic books, and blogs about parenthood at The Dorky Daddy  He lives in central New York with his wife, kids and cats — all but his wife dictating his sleep patterns. Find out more and contact Dave at his website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the author.

The Hugging Tree by Jill Neimark

hugging-tree-coverThe Hugging Tree: A Story of Resilience

Jill Neimark, Author

Nicole Wong, Illustrator

Magination Press, Sep. 22, 2015

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Trees, Nature, Determination, Resilience, Hope, Compassion

Opening: “On a bleak and lonely rock / by a vast and mighty sea / grew a lonely little tree / where no tree should ever be.”

Synopsis: This is a story about a lonely little tree planting its roots on a high cliff above a beautiful and unforgiving sea. The tree basks in the spring and summer sunbeams and endures the raging storms and the cold winters. It thrives with the ebbs and flows of the sea.  It provides a home for a loon family. Over time the harsh environment begins to tear its exposed roots and weakens the tree. One day a boy discovers the tree high on the cliff. Everyday he brings rich soil and tends to the tree until it one day it fulfills its greatness.

Why I like this book:

The Hugging Tree is an inspiring story about a tree’s resilience to thrive and survive the harsh challenges of being the only tree at the top of a cliff. Jill Neimark’s poetic and rhythmic text sings off the pages as we follow a tree through its many seasons. The story is a beautiful metaphor of the natural world that children will understand and embrace as they face challenges in their daily lives.  It will introduce them to themes of resilience, determination and standing tall during difficult times.

The story is also a triumphant reminder of the inescapable connection between people’s actions and nature. The boy shows love and compassion in his tender care for the tree so that it begins to thrive and realize its full potential. It is also reminds children that they too can make a difference.

Nicole Wong’s watercolors are exquisite, lively and expressive and contribute significantly to the story. There is power in her illustrations of the stormy sea and windy coast, and sensitivity when the tree is ragged and barely standing. This is an exceptional pairing of art and text.

My Favorite Lines:

Soft gold sunbeams / kissed her crown, / warm as honey pouring down. / At night she raised her branches high / to greet the moon up in the sky.

“Mighty cliff, hold me tight. / Don’t let me blow away.” / “Little tree, with all my might, ‘ I’ll hold you close, / night and day.”

Now every day new people stop / to rest beneath the little tree / and dream the things we all dream of. / To love, to share, to give, to dare / to grow just where we are. /

And to this very day they come. / For on a splendid sunny rock / by a warm and bright blue sea / a great big hugging tree / grows just where she was meant to be.

Resources: There is A Note to Parents and Caregivers in the back pages, which is a perfect resource for parents, teachers and counselors helping children build resilience. It provides suggestions to help children talk about the challenges they face daily (i.e. bullying, disappointments, loss, etc.) and tools to cope. Make sure you also read Neimark’s remarks at the beginning of the book about the conception of The Hugging Tree. Visit Jill Neimark at her website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

*Please Note: My website will be on hiatus until October 19.

A Happy Hat – Perfect Picture Book Friday

A Happy Hat9781433813382_p0_v1_s260x420A Happy Hat

Cecil Kim, Author

Joo-Kyung Kim, Illustrator

Imagination Press, Fiction, Sep. 28, 2013

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes:  Hats, Resilience, Self-worth, Contentment, Optimism, Hope

Opening: “I am a hat. I am worn out here and there. I have a few holes, and even a few weeds sticking out. But I am still very much a hat. A very happy hat. I have lots of stories to tell.”

Synopsis: This is the story of a very happy and stylish hat made by the most popular hat maker in town. It is a  black silk hat decorated with peacock feathers. There are many gentlemen who want to buy the hat.  But, its first owner is a new groom on his wedding day. The hat feels very special to be worn for such a festive occasion.  As time passes the hat ends up in a second-hand store for sale where it is purchased by a magician. The hat feels lucky that it can make so many children laugh. The hat eventually ends up with a street musician who turns it upside down to collect coins to feed his hungry family. The hat is joyful to have children dance and giggle around it. One day a dog steals the hat and abandons it in the woods where it weathers the seasons with a positive attitude, until a mother bird makes her nest in the hat. What will happen to the hat?

Why I like this book:  Cecil Kim has written a beautiful story about an extraordinary hat that manages to find the good in life no matter its challenges. I love that it is told from the hat’s upbeat viewpoint. There are many teachable moments for children to learn about disappointment, challenges, self-worth, self-discovery, hope and optimism — all presented in the tale of a silk top hat. Before it was translated, it was originally published in Korean in 2011.  Joo-Iyung Kim’s illustrations are bold and colorful and remind me of a collage.

Resources: The book itself is a resource. The tale ends with a double-page spread of illustrations that give children the opportunity to imagine and write a caption about what the hat, the magician and street musician are thinking.  After the baby bird leaves the hat, children are encouraged to draw a picture of who they think should be the hat’s next owner. There also is a double-page spread written by Mary Lamia, PhD, for parents, teachers and caregivers on how to teach children about disappointment, encourage hope, and develop a positive outlook on life.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Car Goes Far

CarGoeFarCVRCar Goes Far

Michael Garland, Author and Illustrator

Holiday House, I Like to Read Series, Fiction, 2013

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes: Shiny car gets dirty, Humor, Resilience

Opening:  “Car looks good.”

Synopsis:  As a shiny red car begins on a trip to a burger joint, a gas station, and a store, it drives into trouble. Car is stuck in a traffic jam next to a construction site, gets dirt slung on it, is choked by the smoke and exhaust from other cars, and receives a downpour of droppings from a flock of birds. Car is defeated.  What will Car do?

Why I like this book: Michael Garland has written and illustrated a delightful book with very simple text for young readers. For example, “Car gets wet. Splash, splash.” There is a lot of show and tell.  He uses a lot of fun verbs to describe the action. His digital artwork is very expressive and colorful. Car’s headlights look like eyes and its bumper shows a toothy smile when it’s happy and a frown when it’s sad. Kids of all ages will enjoy Car’s animated expressions. Afterall, this is Michael Garland and his artwork stands out as a feast for the eyes! Make sure you check out the front and end pages for a view of Car’s neighborhood.  This is an entertaining book for children learning to read on their own. It will be read again and again. Visit Michael Garland at his website.