My Whirling, Twirling Motor and My Wandering Dreaming Mind by Merriam Sarcia Saunders

October is ADHD Awareness Month

ADHD Awareness Month is celebrated every October, with events and activities happening across the country and globally. AD/HD behavior can take many forms like hyperactivity or the inability to concentrate. I’ve selected two books written by Merriam Sarcia Saunders and illustrated by Tammie Lyon, to showcase the similarities and differences. Children dealing with ADHD or ADD will see themselves in the characters of the books.  Published by Magination Press in 2019 and 2020, these upbeat books are for children 4-8 years old.

My My Whirling, Twirling Motor – 2019

Synopsis: Charlie feels like he has a whirling, twirling motor running inside him…all the time!  He can’t turn it off. At school, he talks out of turn, wiggles too much, makes sounds that annoy the other kids, and forgets his snack, lunch and homework, At home he has trouble settling down for dinner, brushing his teeth and squirming in bed.  He just can’t quiet the busy motor.  When his mom talks to him at bedtime, he wonders if he’s trouble and yanks the covers over his head. Instead, she has a surprise for him. She reads him a list about all the things he accomplishes that day.

My Wandering Dreaming Mind – 2020

Synopsis: Sadie feels like her thoughts are soaring into the clouds and she can’t bring them back down to earth.  She has has trouble remembering the teacher’s instructions and does the wrong lesson. Her mind can travel so far away, that she forgets to put things away, forgets her sister’s soccer game, doesn’t finish her homework, loses her library books, and has a tough time listening to conversations with her friends.  When she asks her parents why her mind wanders and why she makes so many mistakes, they have a clever way to help Sadie remember how amazing she is.

Why I like these books:

Both of Saunders’s picture books draw readers into how Charlie and Sadie experience their worlds with their own relatable words. Readers will almost feel the the bees buzzing in Charlie’s body, making it almost impossible for him to settle down. He has to keep moving. With Sadie, they will feel how much more interesting it is to imagine ponies and fairies, than remembering to do chores. Both Charlie and Sadie feel like they are in trouble all the time, which impacts their self-esteem. Many kids will identify with Charlie and Sadie’s predicaments. I love how the author approaches both situations with their parents, who focus on what their children “can” do and point out their exceptional abilities, qualities and talents.

Tammie Lyon’s energetic and expressive illustrations beautifully compliment the stories.  You can see her lively and colorful artwork in the gorgeous covers.

Resources: Both books include a Note to Parents and Caregivers with more information on ADHD, behavior management, self-esteem, and helping children focus on the positive things they do. They each have their gifts to share with others. Great discussion book that is not preachy.

Merriam Sarcia Saunders, LMFT, is a psychotherapist and ADHD Certified Clinical Services Provider who works with families with AD/HD and Autism Spectrum Disorder. She lives in Northern California. Visit Saunders at her website. You can follow her on twitter @ADHDchat

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for a review.

A Girl Like You by Frank Murphy and Carla Murphy

A Girl Like You

Frank Murphy and Carla Murphy, Authors

Kayla Harren, Illustrator

Sleeping Bear Press, Fiction, Jul. 15, 2020

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Girls, Embracing individuality, Diversity, Self-esteem, Self-confidence, Friendships

Opening: There are billions and billions and billions of people in the world. But you are the only YOU there is!

Book Jacket Synopsis:

Every girl is a wonder! A Girl Like You encourages girls to embrace what makes them unique, to choose kindness, and to be their own advocates. In an age when girls know they can be whatever the want, this book reminds them of all the ways to be beautifully, brilliantly, and uniquely themselves.

Why I like this book:

Frank and Carla Murphy’s magnificent book celebrates girlhood and encourages girls to discover the unique individuals that they are. Readers will meet girls who are brave enough to try new things and not be afraid of failing; girls who pursue their big dreams;  girls who share their thoughts and opinions with others; and girls who have empathy, listen, and are kind to friends in trouble. The messages throughout are beautiful.

This is not just a book for girls. It is also a book that mother and daughter will want to share together. In fact I have adult friends who would benefit from the many beautiful reminders of who girls/women really are. This is a perfect gift book.

Kayla Harren’s endearing and vibrant illustrations show a wide-range of diversity among the characters. I was delighted to see an illustration of a girl with Vitiligo, a skin pigment disorder. Kudos to the illustrator for making the characters inclusive. The end pages are also fun!

Resources: This book will spark many interesting discussions at home and in the classroom. With older girls, encourage them to make a list about the things they like about themselves or write a short story or poem about how they are special. With younger girls have them draw a picture.  This book pairs beautifully with Frank Murphy’s A Boy Like You, so both could be used together in a classroom setting.

Frank Murphy is a teacher who writes and a writer who teaches. After writing A Boy Like You, he wanted to write this book, but knew he couldn’t do it without the help of his best friend and wife, Carla Murphy, who is a pediatric nurse who has been helping kids get better for more than 15 years. This is her first book.  They live in near Philadelphia, with a daughter and their two dogs.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

Lulu the One and Only by Lynnette Mawhinney

Lulu the One and Only

Lynnette Mawhinney, Author

Jennie Poh, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Jun. 9, 2020

Suitable for ages: 4-8

Themes: Racially-mixed people, Prejudices, Individuality, Self-esteem, Family Relationships

Opening: “My name is Luliwa Lovington, but everyone calls me Lulu. It means “pearl” in Arabic.

Synopsis:

Lulu and Zane’s mother is from Kenya. Their father is white and he coaches Zane’s hockey team. When she’s with her dad, kids think they are adopted. But being a mixture of both her parents stirs up the inevitable question…”What are you? ” Lulu hates that question.

Her older brother Zane, says the question is annoying. But he’s proud of his family and being brown. So he creates a power phrase that he uses: “I am magic made from my parents.”   He says “It helps people understand who you are, not what you are.” Will Lulu find her power phrase?

Why I like this book:

Lynnette Mawhinney has written a sensitive and heartfelt story that empowers children who are mixed race, biracial, or multiracial. Lulu is always being asked the BIG question: What are you? In the story she learns how to deal with her feelings about being mixed race and how to stand proud when she is asked that inevitable question.  There is so much beauty in this story.

Mixed race children often deal with teasing, like her brother Zane. When Lulu is asked THAT question, it comes across as curiosity from some kids, teasing from others. Lulu is a spunky character who is fortunate to have an older, confident brother in Zane, who can help her.

I like that the story is based on the real-life experiences of the author. It is a book that multiracial children and their families will identify with, but it is also a story that should be shared with all children. It is a perfect discussion book for classrooms.

Jennie Poh’s adorable illustrations are cheery and uplifting. They also showcase the bond Lulu and Zane have with their parents.

Resources: The author is biracial and shares many ways parents can start conversations with their children about race. Make sure you check out her Author’s Note at the end.

Lynnette Mawhinney, Ph.D, is the author of many books on education and teaching, but this is her first children’s book. She is a teacher educator that helps to prepare future teachers for the classroom. Lynnette uses her power phrase whenever she needs it as she is proud to be biracial. She lives in Chicago with her husband.  Visit her at her website.  Visit her on twitter: @lkmawhinney.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for a review.

Fantastic You by Danielle Dufayet

Fantastic You

Danielle Dufayet, Author

Jennifer Zivoin, Illustrator

Magination Press, Fiction, Sep. 3, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 5-8

Themes: Emotional development, Making mistakes, Self-esteem, Love, Kindness

Opening: There’s one special person I’m alsways with…can you guess who?

Bookjacket Synopsis:  There is one special person you get to spend your whole life with: You! So go ahead, cheer yourself on! Shine Bright! You are the best person to take care of yourself. When you show yourself love and kindness, the world will smile back at you — fantastic you!

Why I love this book:

Danielle Dufayet has written an inspiring and beautiful concept book that teaches children how to create a loving relationship with themselves. The narrative reminds me of a self-nurturing pep talk. Each page nudges readers to be loving, kind, and positive towards themselves. “Hello, Awesome!” And making mistakes is also part of learning and a time to take special care. “If I mess up, I say sorry. I do what I can to help make things right, even if it’s an accident. Then I remember to forgive myself.”  Every page energizes readers with a special nugget of self awareness and wisdom that children will easily grasp..

This book is brilliant and I love it’s simplicity. Adults will enjoy reading it with their children. It is a gentle reminder to take care of ourselves first, because we have a lifetime relationship with ourselves.

I wish you could see the actual book cover. It has a shimmer to it and is gorgeous! Jennifer Zivoin’s illustrations convey the Dufayet’s upbeat narrative and shows a variety of emotions as children try to be their best self. They are beautiful.

Fantastic You is perfect for all children, ranging from pre-K to elementary — and adults.  I recommend the book for every home and school. This is a perfect gift book!

Resources:  There is a special Note to Parents and Caregives by Julia Martin Burch, PhD, with more information about to help children cope with big emotions, self-soothe, and use helpful self-talk, like “I can do this.”

Danielle Dufayet is the author of another favorite book, You Are Your Strong. She also teaches English and public speaking/self-empowerment classes for kids. She lives in San Jose, California. Visit Danielle at her website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy from publisher.

Stardust by Jeanne Willis

Stardust

Jeanne Willis, Author

Briony May Smith, Illustrator

Nosy Crow (Imprint of Candlewick), Fiction, Feb. 12, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 2-5

Themes: Siblings, Self-esteem, Multigenerational relationships, Being true to yourself

Opening: “When I was little, I wanted to be a star. My sister was a star. Everybody said so. But nobody said it to me.”

Book Synopsis:

A little girl dreams of being a star, but no matter what she does — finding Mom’s lost wedding ring,  winning a costume prize, or knitting a perfect scarf — her big sister always shines brighter. Then, one night, the girl gazes up at the sky with her grandfather.  He tells her about the Big Bang theory and how everything and everyone is made of stardust, so we all shine in different ways.

Why I like this book:

This quiet book would make an excellent read-aloud before bedtime. The narrative has a lovely rhythm and it speaks to the core of a child’s insecurity of feeling overshadowed by an older sibling. I enjoyed the relationship between the grandfather and his granddaughter.  The illustrations are stunning and compliment the storyline. They also depict how diverse we all are as humans. I love the ending where readers will discover the girl does shine in her own special way. This is a great family discussion book as it encourages siblings to share their insecurities and their dreams.

Resources: Read the book to children. Ask each child to say what they like about each a sibling or classmate  — what makes them shine. Or ask each child to draw a picture about what they dream about and what makes them shine.

Jeanne Willis wrote her first book when she was five. After that, there was no turning back. She has since written more than three hundred books and has won several awards, which are arranged in the attic where she works along with her collection of caterpillars, pink-toed tarantula skins, and live locusts. Jeanne Willis lives in London.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Review copy provided by publisher.

Being You by Alexs Pate

Being You

Alexs Pate, Author

Soud, Illustrator

Capstone Editions, Fiction, Oct. 1, 2018

Suitable for Ages: 3-9

Themes: Individuality, Self-discovery, Interpersonal relationships, Hope, Diversity

Opening: This story is about you and / the way your eyes will shower light / to open a path through the noisy night. 

Synopsis:

When you are a kid, it can be hard to be who you really are. In Being You, two kids learn that they have a choice about how the world sees them. They can accept the labels that others try to put on them, or they let their inner selves shine. Are they powerful, smart, strong, capable, talented? Together these kids find people who see their value and help them face the world on their own terms.

But in this world, there are whispers

that move through the air

like paper planes or falling leaves

They swirl around you

Sometimes they tell you

who you are

But only you and love decide

Why I like this book:

Being You is a celebration about what makes children unique individuals and how they can use their voices to communicate who they are to others. It is a contemplative book that gently nudges kids to find their own inner greatness, with the support from the adults and friends in their lives.

The book is poetic with occasional punctuation and open-ended expressions. The spare text is lyrical and packs a powerful punch. It questions, probes, and encourages readers to look at their own lives. This is a beautiful story that encourages self-discovery and builds self-esteem.

Soud’s illustrations are breathtaking and add to the depth of Pate’s theme of individuality. They are colorful and expressive and shine a light on diversity.

Resources: This is a beautiful discussion book belongs in elementary classrooms. Make sure you read the comments from the author at the end of the book. Ask children if they had a sign on their chest what would it say? And then ask them to list five things. Then encourage each child share.

Alex Pape grew up in Philadelphia. He is the author of several books, including Losing Absalom, named Best First Novel by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association and winner of the Minnesota Book Award. He has been a corporate executive, small-business owner, and college professor. In 2012 he launched Innocent Classroom, a program that seeks to end educational disparaities by closing the relationship gap between educators and students of color. You may also want to visit his personal website.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

*Reviewed from a library copy.

My Demon’s Name is Ed by Danah Khalil

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My Demon’s Name is Ed

Danah Khalil, Author

Second Story Press, Fiction, Oct. 4, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 12-16

Themes: Anorexia Nervosa, Eating Disorders, Peer Pressure, Mental Health, Self-Esteem, Courage, Hope

Synopsis: Danah’s eating disorder has a personality — it’s a demon she calls Ed, the voice in her head that undermines her self-esteem and her perception of the world. How can she explain to her family and friends that even when she tries to develop healthier eating and exercising habits, there is a demon wriggling inside her mind, determining her every step?

ED: “There is nothing wrong while I am in control.”

“You see? It is “normal” to lose weight. I told you. Yes, I am always right. You must keep going. Keep going.

While Danah knows that what she is doing is unhealthy, the validation and sense of control that her “demon” gives her begins to win out over everything and everyone else.

Why I like this book:

Danah Khalil has written compelling novel based on her own struggle with an eating disorder, anorexia nervosa. She is 14 years old when her dieting begins. It takes guts to share something so profoundly emotional and deeply personal. I applaud Danah for bravely sharing her realistic story. Her suffering is visceral. Her voice is completely authentic. The solitude and misery she plummets into is dark and seductive. She calls the demon who lives in her head, “Ed.” And, with every journal entry, Ed’s voice  (written in italics,) is there to coax, command and control her every thought and action.

Danah tells her story entirely through diary entries she started at age 14, at the beginning of the anorexia through her recovery at age 18. Although it is an interesting way to watch the progression of her anorexia, the entries become very focused on meal plans, weighing herself, daily workouts, anger towards her parents, and some lovely poetry. This is the isolation she creates for herself. My only sadness is that I never really get to know Danah, her family and friends, even after she enters a treatment facility. I hoped her therapy would reveal more family interaction.

Danah’s story is a hopeful story for families with a child who has an anorexia, or for anyone who is close to someone with an eating disorder. Although Danah recovers, she acknowledges that it will be with her forever and she will need to stay vigilant. Many years ago I worked with teens and young women with eating disorders and it brought back many memories. My Demon’s Name is Ed  is an excellent book that will alert parents, siblings, friends, and teachers to the earliest symptoms of eating disorders and seek help.

Resources: The book includes information on common symptoms and book recommendations. I recommend that readers also check out the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA),  which provides information about the eating disorders, support groups, treatment options and stories of hope.

Check other Middle Grade review links on author Shannon Messenger’s Marvelous Middle Grade Monday post.

Connecting Dots

Connecting Dots516dZBPfoUL__SX348_BO1,204,203,200_Connecting Dots

Sharon Jennings, Author

Second Story Press, Mar. 1, 2015

A Gutsy Girl Book (4): 197 pages

Suitable for Ages: 9-13; Grades 6-8

Themes: Self-Esteem, Family Relationships, Loss, Abuse, Coming of Age, Friendship

Opening: Until I was five, I thought my grandmother was my mother. In kindergarten, I found out the truth.

Book Synopsis: My name is Cassandra. Some people think I’m an orphan.  They say that truth is stranger than fiction, and in my case that’s definitely true. My best friend, Leanna, keeps bugging me to write my life story. She loves writing. Me, I’d rather be an actress. But telling the truth for once about my life could feel good. You see, I always thought my grandma raised me because I was an orphan. But when she died, I found out that was a lie. It’s hard to find out that nobody wants you. For a long time I didn’t have a real home, or any real friends. But things can change, and now I’m sitting here at my desk in my room, writing my story so you can read it, strange or not.

Why I like this book:

Sharon Jennings has written a heartbreaking and heartwarming coming of age story about a 12-year-old girl who is shipped off to the homes of many cruel relatives who treat her with disdain. Cassandra suffers abuse, hardship and finds little love. All she really wants is to find a family and a home where she feels she belongs.

Connecting Dots is a richly textured story narrated by Cassandra.  Cassandra’s character is memorable, strong, resilient, fearless and wise. In the face of such adversity and unimaginable abuse, she finds a bosom buddy in Leanna Mets, who encourages her to write her life story. As Cassandra shares her pages with Leanna, she finds writing cathartic, empowering and healing. Acting in school plays and with a kid’s theater company strengthens her resolve to never lose sight of her dream to become an actress.

The plot is strong, honest, tough and clever, with many twists and turns.  When you finish, you’ll want to cheer Cassandra for connecting the dots in her life. This third installment lives up to the “Gutsy Girls” book. Connecting Dots is definitely a companion book to Home Free, where Cassandra’s friend Leanna is the protagonist.

Note to Parents: There is a mention of Cassandra being sexually abused by an uncle Ernie and punished by an aunt with an enema and beatings. Although the book is for readers 9-12, parents may want to judge their child’s maturity level.

Other Gutsy Girl Books: Finding Grace, by Becky Citra; The Contest, by Caroline Stellings; Home Free, by Sharon Jennings; and Connecting Dots, by Sharon Jennings.

Sharon Jennings has written over 60 books for young people, many of them award winners and nominees. Home Free, the prequel to Connecting Dots, was nominated for a Governor General’s Award, the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award, and the Silver Birch Award. Visit Sharon Jennings at her website.

Check out the Marvelous Middle Grade Monday books reviewed and listed on author Shannon Messenger’s blog.

MMGM2

I’m a Great Little Kid Series

I’m a Great Little Kid series

Today I’m sharing three books of the new I’m a Great Little Kid series, co-published by Second Story Press and BOOST Child Abuse Prevention & Intervention. Never Give Up, Reptile Flu and Fifteen Dollars and Thirty-Five Cents, are the first of six planned picture books for kids aged 5-8 to teach important lessons about communication, self-esteem, and self-confidence. Many of the same characters appear in each book. Written by Kathryn Cole with colorful illustrations by Quin Leng, the series will have a Facilitator’s Guide, which will be published with the final book in the series.  This is an important series that can be used to teach character education in the classroom.

Never Give Up9781927583609_p0_v1_s260x420Never Give Up: A Story about Self-esteem

April 2015

Synopsis: Nadia looks on as her friend, Shaun, struggles to ride his bicycle in the park — with training wheels. A group of kids laugh and tease Shaun about riding his “tricycle” and watch him take a spill. Shaun picks up his bike and tries again and again, each time crashing.  Nadia feels badly that she isn’t a good friend and doesn’t stand up to the taunting, but she offers to help him. Determined to not to give up, Shaun manages to impress his friends, win their respect and feel like a king.

Reptile FluuntitledReptile Flu: A Story about Communication

May 2015

Synopsis: Kamal is studying reptiles at school. His teacher announces a surprise class trip to visit a reptile show at the museum. Everyone cheers, except Kamal. He’s terrified of live reptiles, especially snakes. But he’s even more afraid of admitting his fear to anyone, including his teacher. What if his friends tease him? He unsuccessfully tries to get out of the trip by telling his parents and sister about his fear, but they are too busy to listen. At the last-minute Kamal finds a way communicate his fear with surprising results.

Fifteen51hWwUW+0KL__SY498_BO1,204,203,200_Fifteen Dollars and Thirty-Five Cents: A Story about Choices

September 8, 2015

Synopsis: Joseph and Devon are good friends at school. Joseph spots money on the playground and yells to Devon, “I’m rich!”  Joseph wants to keep the money, “finder keepers.” Devon thinks someone may have lost the money and wants to take it to the office and help find its owner. They spot Claire and Lin searching the playground; Lin was crying because she lost her money. During class, the teacher asks why Lin is so sad. Joseph shoots Devon a look to not tell. Will Devon be able to convince Joseph to do the right thing?

Kathryn Cole has spent a forty-five-year career in children’s books as an illustrator, art director, editor, designer, and publisher at Scholastic, OUP, Stoddart Kids and Tundra Books. Her experience along with 13 years of volunteering for BOOST give her a strong understanding of the issues children face every day. She is co-managing editor at Second Story Press in Toronto.

Qin Leng has illustrated a number of children’s books. She was born in Shanghai, China and lived in France before moving to Montreal. She always loved to illustrate the innocence of children and has developed a passion for children’s books. She has created art for many award-nominated picture books.

Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass

Yaqui Delgado 9780763671648_p0_v3_s260x420Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass

Meg Medina, Author

Candlewick Press, Fiction, 2013

Awards:  2014 Pura Belpré Author Award; ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults; International Latino Best Books Awards – Young Adult Fiction; and  Kirkus Reviews Best Books for 2013

Suitable for Ages: 14-17

Themes: New Girl, Latin Americans, Bullying, High School, Family Relationships, Friendships

Book Jacket Synopsis: “Yaqui Delgado wants to kick your ass.” That’s what some girl tells Piddy Sanchez one morning before school. Too bad Piddy doesn’t even know who Yaqui Delgado is, let alone what she’s done to piss her off.  All Piddy knows is that Yaqui hates her — and she better watch her back because Yaqui isn’t kidding around.

At first Piddy just focuses on trying to find out more about the father she’s never met and how to balance honors courses with her weekend job at the neighborhood hair salon. But as the harassment escalates, avoiding Yaqui and her gang starts to take over Piddy’s life.  Is there any way for Piddy to survive without closing herself off and running away from her problems?

Why I like this book:

  • Meg Medina focuses on the paralyzing impact of bullying in this raw, emotional and honest novel. The theme is timely and based on the author’s own experience with a bully as a teen, which adds depth and credibility to the story.
  •  The richly textured Latino story is set in Queens, New York, where Medina grew up.  The story is peppered with Spanish expressions, which contributes to the reader’s experience.
  • The characters are diverse and memorable. Piddy is an outgoing, smart and attractive Latina girl who wants to be a scientist. Yaqui is a jealous and threatening adversary who hates Piddy simply because she’s the “new” girl at school. Piddy’s Mama is strong and protective. Lila, her Mama’s best friend, is Piddy’s only confidant.  She works at the hair salon with Piddy, sells Avon and adds some comic relief.
  • Medina’s first-person narrative is extremely effective. The reader feels Piddy’s growing panic as the harassment increases and Yaqui and her gang stalk and close around her. Piddy is trapped and knows that if she tells school authorities or her mama, she will be “digging her grave.” Her grades dive, she isolates herself, skips school and her personality changes.
  • The plot is multi-layered, courageous and complicated. Medina delves deeply into the loneliness, fear and trauma of a bullied teen trying to handle the situation alone and the realistic mother-daughter relationship with family secrets.  The pacing is fast, engaging and keeps the reader turning pages. There are unexpected surprises and a realistic ending.  I had a hard time letting go of the story and characters.
  • Older teens will identify with Piddy and relate to the theme and plot.  Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass belongs in every school library because it is such an excellent work of fiction and a great discussion book.

Meg Medina is an award-winning Cuban-American author who writes picture books, middle grade, and YA fiction. She is the 2014 recipient of the Pura Belpré medal and the 2013 CYBILS Fiction winner for her young adult novel, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass. She is also the 2012 Ezra Jack Keats New Writers medal winner for her picture book Tia Isa Wants a Car.  Visit Meg Medina at her website.