Around the Table That Grandad Built by Melanie Heuiser Hill

Around the Table That Grandad Built

Melanie Heuiser Hill, Author

Jaime Kim, Illustrator

Candlewick Press, Fiction, Sep. 10, 2019

Suitable for Ages: 3-7

Themes: Holidays, Traditions, Multigenerational, Thanksgiving, Diversity

Opening: This is the table that Grandad built. These are the sunflowers picked by my cousins, set on the table that Grandad built.

Book Synopsis:

In a delightful take on the cumulative classic “This Is the House That Jack Built,” a family  gathers with friends and neigbors to share a meal around a very special table.  The table brims with memorable associations: napkins sewn by Mom, glasses from Mom and Dad’s wedding, silverware gifted to Dad by his grandmother long ago. And of course there is a delightful spread of food — the squash and potatoes from the garden, bread baked by Gran, and pies made by family and friends. All give thanks.

Why I like this book:

Melanie Heuiser Hill’s Around the Table That Grandad Built is a joyous celebration of family, friends and community. It is sure to become a favorite family treasure, perfect for Thanksgiving or any holiday feast.

It also is a multigenerational book that quietly emphasizes diversity through food, faces and culture. Grandad’s table is a gesture of openness and inclusivity.  Coming to feast at the table is a time to build upon memories, show gratitude, recognize similarities and give thanks. The children are the new generation honoring the old but making new memories.

The cover showcases Jaime Kim’s bold and colorful Illustrations, as well as the joy and anticipation on the childrens’ faces.  Who wouldn’t want to dine at this table!

Resources: As the holidays approach, include them in the special activities like setting the table, making the table decorations, helping with the food preparation and baking. Talk about inviting a veteran or someone who is alone to join you. Create some new traditions.

Melanie Heuiser Hill is the author of the middle-grade novel Giant Pumpkin Suite. She lives in Minneapolis with her husband and children.  About Around the Table That Grandad Built, she says, “I have a fondness for long tables crowded with food food and loved ones — and homemade pie for dessert.” Visit Melanie’s website where she shares stories of her large family and photographs.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.
*Review copy provided by publisher.

Squanto’s Journey: The Story of the First Thanksgiving

Squantos Journey102606130Squantos Journey:  The Story of the First Thanksgiving

Joseph Bruchac, author

Greg Shed, illustrator

Silver Whistle – Harcourt, Inc., Historical Fiction, 2000

Suitable for: Ages 6-12

Themes: Squanto, Wampanoag Indians, Pilgrims, Thanksgiving, Survival

Opening/Synopsis“My story is both strange and true.  I was born in the year the English call 1590.  My family were leaders of the Patuxet people and I, too, was raised to lead. But in 1614 I was taken to Spain against my will.  Now it is 1621 and I am again in my homeland.  My name is Squanto, I would like to tell you my tale.”   Squanto plays a key role in bringing peace between the Indians and the English settlers who arrived in Plymouth.  The settlers were not prepared for the harsh challenges they faced.  Squanto taught them ways of the living on the land so that they could plant crops, hunt, fish and prepare for the winter.  When the autumn arrived they celebrated the good harvest with a feast for all.   Squanto’s tribe worked with the settlers to help them survive.

Why I like this book:  The story of the Pilgrims and the first Thanksgiving is known to children.  Author Joseph Bruchac tells the story from the Native American perspective in first person.  Squanto ( Tisquantum) was captured by the British, taken to Spain as a slave where he escaped and found his way back home to New England.  He was the first Native American Indian to live in the European and Indian world.  The author’s research is thorough and he spent many years among the Native American tribe.  He wrote this fascinating  and inspiring account of how Squanto taught the Pilgrims to survive the harsh New World.  Greg Shed’s research took him to Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth, MA, where he studied the landscape, and buildings and settlement so he could capture the authenticity in his bold and beautiful illustrations.

Resources: There is an informative Author’s Note at the end.  The Plimoth Plantation has a wonderful section “Just for Kids,” where children can learn to talk like a Pilgrim, take a virtual  Thanksgiving field trip sponsored by Scholastic, and work with materials for reports and coloring pages.  Click here to view a short video on the Plimoth Plantation produced by the History Channel.

Susanna Hill’s Thanksgiving Contest

They were supposed to go to Grandma’s for Thanksgiving, but the blizzard came in fast.  The wind howled.  The tree creaked.

Papa stockpiled wood inside the burrow.  He stomped his feet and bolted the door.

Papa looked at his shivering brood of three.  “I know you are disappointed, but we are safer in our burrow.”

“What about Grandma’s acorn pie, ” asked Sammy.  His pudgy cheeks quivered and is large glossy eyes brimmed with tears.

“We have plenty of nuts, berries, fruit, seeds and grains to feast upon,” said Mama.  “Why don’t you do your chores.  Be thankful that we’re together.”

Sammy, Teddy and Rose tidied up their nests and swept the burrow.  Sammy wondered what they could do to make Thanksgiving special.

Then Sammy spied a twig resting against the wall inside the burrow.

“Hey Teddy and Rose, I have an idea,” said Sammy.  The three siblings huddled and whispered.  Rose jumped up and down.   The rest of the morning they worked in a corner of the burrow on their idea.

Mama worked all morning preparing their feast.  Papa tended to the fire so that the burrow remained warm.

Sammy carefully placed their centerpiece on the table.

“It’s beautiful!”  Mama gasped.

“It’s our thankful tree,” beamed Sammy.  Tied to the branches were acorns, pine cones, and dried leaves bearing the names, Mama, Papa, Grandma, Sammy, Teddy and Rose.

They heard a rustle in the tunnel and a voice called out,  “Acorn pie anyone?”

“Grandma,”  they chirped.  “We’re thankful you’re here!”

Susanna Leonard Hill is sponsoring a Thanksgiving Writing Contest.  Here are the rules: Post your 250 (or fewer) word kids’ Thanksgiving story, beginning with “They were supposed to go to Grandma’s for Thanksgiving, but the blizzard came in fast…” and add your link to the link list.  The last day to submit is November 24th!  Add your own entry at http://susannahill.blogspot.com/2011/11/oh-excitement-thanksgiving-contest.html.

 

Copyright (c) 2011,  Patricia Howe Tilton, All Rights Reserved