Wishtree by Katherine Applegate

Wishtree

Katherine Applegate, Author

Feiwel & Friends, Fiction, Sep. 26, 2017

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes: Trees, Wishes, Crows, Animals, Friendship, Tolerance

Opening: It’s hard to talk to trees. We’re not big on chitchat. That’s not to say we can’t do amazing things, things you’ll probably never do. Cradle downy owlets. Steady flimsy tree forts. Photosynthesize. But talk to people? Not so much.

Synopsis:

Red is an oak tree who is 216 rings old. Red is the neighborhood “wishtree.” Every May 1 people come from all over town to write their most private wishes on pieces of paper, cloth, and socks and tie them to Red’s branches. He holds their hopes and dreams in his limbs. Then, they whisper their wish. Red listens but never responds. It’s against the rules for a tree to speak to a human.

Along with her crow friend Bongo and other animals who seek refuge in Red’s hollows, this “wishtree” watches over the neighborhood. Red has seen a lot of change over 200 years.

When a Muslim family moves in, Red observes how Samar and her family are treated by neighbors. Not everyone is welcoming.  Nasty threats are carved on his trunk, eggs are thrown, and ugly words shouted from passing cars.  More than ever, Red wants to fulfill Samar’s wish to find a friend. When Red learns the property owner may have some plans for him, he breaks some rules and ask his friends for help.

Why I like this book:

Katherine Applegate’s heartwarming middle grade novel is magical and conveys a message that is relevant today. It also reminds us of our common humanity.

The story is narrated by Red, a red oak tree, with compassion, concern, wisdom, and a sense of humor; no easy task for an author. Red’s branches and hollows are home to a birds and a furry cast of comical characters (owls, raccoons, opossums, skunks, cats and a crow) who live to together in harmony — most of the time. Red and his residents communicate openly with each other, but not with humans. Once a year Red is a wishtree for the town. Red’s world is vibrant and harbors a secret that needs to be shared.

Wishtree is a quiet and thoughtful read aloud with the entire family or in the classroom. It has a strong plot that with themes the encourage readers think about diversity, inclusion, acceptance, kindness and the true nature of friendship. It is a delightful mix that will keep readers turning pages. The story has Common Core connections.

For the next few months Greg Pattridge will be hosting Marvelous Middle Grade Monday posts on his wonderful Always in the Middle website. Thank you Greg for keeping MMGM active while author Shannon Messenger is on tour promoting her sixth book, Nightfall, in the Keeper of the Lost Cities series, which was released November 7.

Deep Roots: How Trees Sustain Our Planet

Deep Roots 61SF7ypLrXL__SX424_BO1,204,203,200_Deep Roots: How Trees Sustain Our Planet

Nikki Tate, Author

Orca Book Publishers, Nonfiction, Feb. 9, 2016

Pages: 48

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes: Trees, Forests, Ecosystems, Green Lungs, Water Cycle, Fuel, Shelter

Opening: “No matter where you live, even if it’s in a big city, chances are you won’t be far from a tree or two. It’s a good thing we find trees all over the place.”

Book Jacket Synopsis: Where is the tallest tree in the world? What is a corduroy road? What does a carbon sink do? Why is the baobab called the Tree of Life?

Trees provide us with everything from food, fuel and shelter to oxygen and filtered water. Deep Roots celebrates the central role trees play in our lives, no matter where we live. Each chapter in Deep Roots focuses on a basic element — water, air, fire and earth — and explores the many ways in which we need trees to keep us and our planet healthy and livable.

Why I like this book:

Nikki Tate has written a beautiful nonfiction photo journey for readers to learn about the role of trees in maintaining a vibrant ecosystem, as well as providing food, fuel and shelter.  The story is shown through gorgeous photography, personal stories and facts. The author explains “why trees just might be our best friends, barometers of how we are looking after our planet, and our partners as we move forward to create a healthier world.”

Tate’s book is an inspiring environmental treasure for tree-loving middle grade students who want to plant, study and celebrate their tall green friends.  Every page has a suggestion for youth to “Try This!” activities. There are four chapters that show how trees interact with the four forces of nature — earth, air, water and fire — and how important this relationship is to the balance of the entire planet.

Deep Roots is a welcomed addition to any school library as educators are looking to provide current resources for students about climate change and environmental issues. The Orca Footprints series, has created an exceptional library of books for students.  See other titles below.

Interesting facts from Deep Roots:

  • Earth: Sometimes called the lungs of the planet, trees are critical for producing oxygen, cleansing both air and runoff water of pollutants and feeding the soil when they die.  They also provide food for both humans, animals and insects. Their roots loosen soil and allow water to penetrate the ground, where it can be stored for drier weather.
  • Air: Trees are very busy. Through their leaves and needles they breathe in carbon dioxide (CO2) that clean out car exhaust and other pollutants. Then they breathe out life-sustaining oxygen for human and animal species.
  • Water: When trees suck up water from the soil they release the extra water in the atmosphere.  When enough water has been “breathed out” by the trees, it condenses into clouds and then falls as rain around the planet.
  • Fire: Forest fires can be terrifying,  but they are a normal part of the life cycle of some types of forest. The ash provides nutrients to the soil. It thins out forests so surviving trees grow taller and seedlings can sprout.

Nikki Tate is the author of more than thirty books, most of which are for children and teenagers. She splits her time between Canmore, Alberta, and Victoria, British Columbia. For more information visit Nikki Tate.

Check other Middle Grade review links on author Shannon Messenger’s Marvelous Middle Grade Monday post.

Picture a Tree – Earth Day, April 22

Picture a Tree9780807565261_p0_v1_s260x420Picture a Tree

Barbara Reid, Author and Illustrator

Albert Whitman & Company, Fiction, 2013

Suitable for ages: 4-7

Themes: Trees, Imagination, Nature, Seasons

Opening: “There is more than one way to picture a tree. You may see a drawing on the sky. A game of dress-up.”

Summary: Picture a tree–what do you see?  A tree can be so many things: a drawing in the sky, a tunnel hovering over a neighborhood,  a home for  birds and animals, a clubhouse, a pirate ship, a great place to climb and think and shade from the heat.

Why I like this book: This is a perfect Earth Day book because it a celebration of trees, one of our most important resources.  Barbara Reid encourages her young readers to stretch their imaginations to see that a tree can be any thing as they change with each season.  Her text is simple and the artwork is gorgeous and lively. Her unique Plasticine creations are pressed onto an illustration board showing layered textures and color for a special visual effect. Both children and adults will study the expressive detail on the pages of this extraordinary book. And, make sure you check out the gorgeous end papers which are filled with pictures of trees. This is a wonderful book for the classroom and home.

Resources: Have children draw pictures of trees for each season and something special about the season.  Visit Barbara Reid’s website where there is a students/teacher artwork page, a picture a tree memory game, videos and a page devoted to working with Plasticine material.