Feel Better Books for “Little Worriers” and for “Little Tempers”

Today I am sharing  two Feel Better Books written by authors Holly Brochmann and Leah Bowen and illustrated by Shirley Ng-Benitez. Both books compliment each other and can be used together. They are written for children ages 3 to 6.

A Feel Better Book for Little Worriers

Magination Press, Fiction, Aug. 7, 2017

Themes: Worry, Anxiety, Rhyme

Opening: How’s it going today, / are you doing all right? / Are you fantastic, and happy and bright?

Synopsis: Worries can feel like a BIG problem to a LITTLE kid! This book helps little ones who are just beginning to recognize and identify their emotions to understand how worry feels and affects them. Do they feel butterflies in their tummies? Is their heart beating fast?  Worries differ for each child. Some children worry about going to bed, finishing homework, learning to swim, and speaking in front of the class.  And some worries can be important and protect them from harm.

A Feel Better Book for Little Tempers

Magination Press, Fiction, Mar. 19, 2018

Themes: Anger, Tempers, Rhyme

Opening: Is it one of those days / you feel misunderstood? / You’re huffy and puffy / and just plain not good.

Synopsis: Sometimes the LITTLEST kids can have the BIGGEST tempers! This books helps young children who are just beginning to recognize and identify their emotions understand how anger feels and affects them.  Are they clenching their fists?  Are they so mad they feel like they may explode? Readers are taught that it’s okay to get mad, if you know what to do.

Why I like these two books:

They are told in catchy rhymes that are joyful and fun to read out loud. The narration is gentle and calming and introduces the subject of worry and temper in a very simple and straightforward manner.  Each book first identifies the feelings of worry and anger through a diverse group of children doing a variety of activities. And then the children are introduced to activities like jumping up and down, spinning, stretching, wiggling, dancing, running, taking deep breaths and giving themselves a BIG hug.

The lively and expressive illustrations will charm children from the start. They are bold, colorful and perfectly capture each story.

Resources: Both books include a “Note to Parents and Caregivers” that gives information about recognizing worry and anger, and offers tools to help manage anxiety and anger. This is an excellent discussion book for home and at school.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book. To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books (PPB) with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s website.

The publisher provided me with advanced copies of the books.

Love, Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom

LoveLizzie51oEU3AbzRL__SX285_Love, Lizzie: Letters to a Military Mom

Lisa Tucker McElroy, Author

Diane Paterson, Illustrator

Albert Whitman & Company, Fiction, 2009

Suitable for Ages: 6-10

Themes: Military Families, Mothers and Daughters, Separation, War

Opening: “Dear Mommy,  I know that it’s only been three days since you went away, but I really, really miss you.  Can you come back soon?”

Summary:  Lizzie’s mother is a soldier who has been deployed overseas to serve her country, and Lizzie misses her a lot.   She and her mother write a lot of letters to help with their separation.  Lizzie keeps her up to date with every day happenings at home with her Daddy and brother.  She talks about school, winning a soccer game and attending the state finals.  Lizzie draws pictures of how she rearranges her room.  She also draws many detailed maps about changes in town, and trips she takes with her Dad and brother to visit grandparents.  Foremost in Lizzie’s mind are the questions “Are you staying safe, Mommy?” and “When will you be home?”

What I like about this book:  This book is a series of hand-written letters with child-like drawings.  The major focus is about how a child deals with a long separation from a parent, especially if the parent is on a dangerous assignment.   Lisa Tucker McElroy has written a compelling book that speaks for the many military children who silently serve at home and endure the long separations, anxiety, fear and concern for the safety of their deployed parent.  They want to know where their parents are, what they are doing, why they miss birthday parties, holidays and soccer tournaments.  Diane Paterson’s colorful and lively artwork is very appealing.

Resources:  The author has written “Tips from Lizzie and Her Mom on Handling Separation.”   A great activity is to encourage your child to create a memory box where they can save things they’ve done throughout the year.  The box can be a way of sharing their year with a returning parent.

Every Friday, authors and KidLit bloggers post a favorite picture book.  To see a complete listing of all the Perfect Picture Books with resources, please visit author Susanna Leonard Hill’s Perfect Picture Books.

Mr. Worry – A Story About OCD; OCD Awareness Week Oct. 10-16, 2011

Mr. Worry – A Story about OCD,  is written by Holly L. Niner, illustrated by Greg Swearingen and published by Albert Whitman & Company for children from Kindergarten to fourth grade.   Niner has written a sensitive and meaningful story about a boy with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).   She has a wonderful grasp of OCD,  as she has a child with the disorder and realizes the importance of seeking early intervention.   Swearingen’s illustrations are rich, soft and perfectly capture the emotion of the story.  I highly  recommend this book for kids with OCD, parents, school counselors and teachers.

Before Kevin goes to sleep every night, he checks his closet to make sure nothing is there, looks under his bed repeatedly to make sure it is safe, pushes his chair against his desk, straightens the books on his desk and lines up the cars on his shelf.  And, he asks his mother the same questions repeatedly.   Kevin worries about everything at home and school.  Once the worry starts he has a hard time stopping because “his mind gets sweaty.”   Kevin’s parents are supportive and take him to talk with a therapist, who helps Kevin understand that he has OCD like many other children and adults.   Kevin is relieved to know that he’s not alone or crazy.  He decides to call his OCD, Mr. Worry.  He pictures Mr. Worry as a little man who keeps track of all of Kevin’s worries.  Kevin’s goal is to begin to hang up the phone on Mr. Worry when he calls.   Through behavioral therapy and medications Kevin begins to manage his OCD.   This book is such an accurate portrayal of OCD, children and families will find comfort in its message.  I also believe that this book could be helpful for any child dealing with excessive fear and anxiety.

Mr.Worry was selected by International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) as the Outstanding Book for Young People with Disabilities in 2005.   Holly Niner also is the author of I Can’t Stop: A Story about Tourette Syndrome

OCD Awareness Week is Oct. 10-16, 2011, and sponsored by the International OCD Foundation .   According to the foundation at least 1 in 200 children and teens in the U.S. have OCD.   Understanding the stress and impact OCD has on their lives is imperative in helping them seek the right treatment.   OCD is an all-consuming, debilitating disorder that affects up to 4 million people in the United States.  The disorder also affects millions more: family, friends and caregivers of those with OCD suffer along
side their loved ones.  Please visit the organization website as it has a wealth of information for children, teens, adults, families and school counselors.  Another interesting website for kids with OCD or anxiety is WorryWiseKids.

Copyright (c) 2011,  Patricia Howe Tilton, All Rights Reserved